Coloured | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Coloured

Brown Horse

A brown to tawny-coloured horse means the owner will travel to some land where he will face harships.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Black Person

Depends which skin colour one has.

If white: one’s natural drives, feelings about coloured people; or if per­son is known, what you feel about them.

If black or brown: one’s own cultural feelings; same as any person’ dream.

Example: \ was in a cubicle or small toilet with a very black coloured woman. She told me there was something wrong with her vagina. She was undressed. I rubbed her va­gina and we both felt enormous passion. I then awoke but couldn’t at first remember the dream. I have refrained from sexual intercourse for some weeks, as I always feel shattered/ tired afterwards. Anyway I woke very wet, yet couldn’t re­member any orgasm. I could remember some question of sex as I awoke. Then I remembered the dream and continued it in fantasy. I experienced powerful urges to find a woman to have a non-committed sexual relationship with. But in the end I wanted to share my feelings with my wife, but she seemed deep asleep and unresponsive. When I slept again I dreamt I was in London, had got off one bus, but was not at any desti­nation. I was standing about not making a move to find my direction. Then I began to look’ (Alfred C).

To understand this dream in some depth it is helpful to think of a sexual drive as a flow, like a river. As such it can be blocked, in which case it will seek an alternative route. Sexual energy or flow is not simply a mechanical thing, ihough; it is also deeply feeling in its connection with the most profound sides of hu­man life such as parenthood and the canng and providing for young. In the history of white people a great deal of sexual frustration has arisen out of the ideas of sin and guilt in their religion.

A view arose for the white race that the black races had an easier and less frustrating relationship with the natural —which includes not only sexuality but the body as a whole, and nature also. So when Alfred dreams of the black woman, he is meeting what is natural and flowing in himself, but which he has blocked by his will because he felt shattered after sex.

The pan about the bus shows him trying to find a direction in which his sexual feelings could move satisfyingly in connection with other people.

Unfonunately, as Jung points out in Man and His Symbols, people in modern society, whether black, yellow, brown or white, have lost their sense of nature and the cosmos as being anything other than processes without consciousness or living feeling. Jung says. No river contains a spirit, no tree is the life principle of a man. no snake the embodiment of wisdom. No voice now speaks to man from stones, plants, and animals, nor does he speak to them believing they can hear.’ The im­portance of such dreams as Arthur’s is that it shows the pas­sionate relationship between our personality and the pnmitive and natural.

A black person, born and bred in a modern setting, would most likely dream of a black bushman to depict their own natural drives. See identity and dreams; Africa; sex in dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ejaculation, Emission

Example: I was in a cubicle or small toilet with a very black coloured woman. She told me there was something wrong with her vagina. She was undressed. I rubbed her vagina and we both felt enormous passion. I then woke but couldn’t at first remember the dream. I have re­frained from sexual intercourse for some weeks, as I always feel shattered/tired afterwards. Anyway I awoke very wet, yet couldn’t remember any ejaculation. Then I remembered the dream and continued it in fantasy. I experienced powerful urges to find a woman to have a non-committed sexual rela­tionship with. But in the end I wanted to share my feelings with my wife, but she seemed deep asleep’ (Alan P).

The example shows how our sexual needs attempt to satisfy them­selves even though we may make a conscious attempt to deny them.

The ejaculation, male or female, shows the sexual na­ture of one’s dream, even if the symbols seem to have no obvious connection.

The attitudes in one’s dream also show something of our relationship to sex. This may be mechanical, fearful, loving, etc. Alan sees sex as a problem to be solved, and has difficulties around commitment. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Flying

Example: During childhood I leamt to fly in a long sequence of dreams. Each linked very clearly to the last. I would go to the nearby churchyard and in the beginning I would run along as fast as I could then jump and just manage to extend the jump by a great effon of will. In subsequent practices I managed gradually to extend the jump for many yards; and eventually I could skim along indefinitely.

The next stage though was to extend my height, and this took enor­mous effort of will and body. I made active swimming mo­tions and climbed, but only held altitude with great and con­stant concentration. With further practice still, this clumsy mode of flying was left behind as I leamt to use pure motiva­tion or will to lift me into the air and carry me easily and gracefully wherever I wished. At this stage my flying was swift, mobile and without struggle’ (Jason V).

The example illustrates how much will, effort and learning can be involved in flying in dreams. This aspect of flying connects with the gaining of independence and the expression of one’s poten­tial. We are all born into a certain paradigm or ‘reality’. At one time, part of the ‘reality’ for most Britons was that anyone without a white skin was a heathen or savage. At other times the reality’ has been that anything heavier than air could not fly. Meteors did not exist because theory discounted them. And so on.

To break free of such paradigms and from the gravity’ or hold our parental and social authority has on us to find a measure of emotional and intellectual freedom, takes the son of will, effort and learning depicted.

Flying expresses also the dealing with our internal influ­ences which hold us down, such as self doubt, anxiety, de­pression.

Example: ‘I was flying. I felt nervous at first that I would fall down, but not afraid. I soon became confident and felt very happy and wanted the sensation to continue. I was lying over a building, could have been a small church, crematorium or graveyard but did not feel afraid or upset. When I woke I lay in bed and tried very hard to keep the feelings with me and, for reasons unknown, I do not wish to forget it’ (Mrs SM). In flying, Mrs SM is finding a way to look at death—the graveyard—which gives her a different viewpoint, a different feeling reaction to it, and she doesn’t want to lose that pre­cious newly learnt view. In their maturing process some peo- pie learn to see their thoughts and emotions as things they expenence rather than things they are, and this brings the sort of new viewpoint seen in the example.

Example: ‘I was in a building with a group of people. I was being chased and suddenly flew up in the air to escape my pursuers’ (Michael O). Learning independence, and the abil­ity to make decisions despite what others feel, may be done by ignoring our own feelings. This may be achieved by always keeping busy; never having quiet moments alone; filling empty periods with entertainment or company; smoking, drinking alcohol, taking sedatives or tranquillisers; ngid posi­tive thinking. Then, as Michael does in his dream, we fly from issues we are pursued by instead of resolving them. This may lead us to the extremes of being either rigidly materialistic, or as rigidly ethereal. In either case we lose contact with every­day human issues, and may begin to have the escape-type flying dream, or an out of body experience.

Example: 41 knew I could fly. I picked up one of the young women I felt love for and flew with her.’ Laughingly I felt like superman, and flew easily’ (Simon W). Flying alone occurs most frequently, showing the independent aspect of flying. But because it often involves our positive feelings of pleasure, flying may depict our sexuality, as above, especially aspects of it expressing freedom from social norms and restraints.

Example: ‘I was floating atop a tree near houses and a rising walkway. I was saying to people around the tree that I had found something wonderful. Reaching out my hand I told them they could join me if they accepted this possibility in themselves. Some thought it was a publicity campaign, but were enjoying the spectacle.

A few reached out and were im­mediately with me, until there were about six of us, men and women. We joined hands, experiencing a most amazing sense of well-being. Then we slowly and effortlessly flew to a great height, leaving a trail of coloured smoke which could be seen for miles. It was to demonstrate the triumph of the human spirit. We then descended and were going somewhere else to show others’ (Margareta H). Transcendence is also depicted by flying.

The tree is Margareta’s personal life. She is at the growing tip, transcending, leaving behind her past. Being high in flight, on a hill or mountain also represents the action of seeing our life as a whole, having a sense of our overall direc­tion and destiny, our essential self. This frequently gives rise to the drive to give of one’s best to others, as Margareta does in leaving behind a sign—the spire of colour.

Some researchers believe flying dreams often precede lucid dreams. See lucid dreams; out of body experience. See also Hill; mountain. Idioms: fly by night, flying high; send flying.... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Religion And Dreams

In most ancient cultures, consider­ation and even veneration of dreams played a great pan. Some groups felt that dream life was more real and imponant than waking life. Not only were dreams looked to for information about hunting (Eskimo groups), but also for ways of healing physical and psychological ills (Greek dream temples) and insights into the medicinal properties of herbs, barks and clays (African tribal witchdoctors). Common to most of these groups, and evident in the Old Testament, was also the sense that through dreams one had awareness of the transcendental or supersensible. St Peter’s dream of the sheet and unclean animals was a turning point in the history of western socicty —as was Constantine’s dream of his victory if he used the symbol of Christianity.

At its most fundamental, the human religious sense emerges out of several factors. One is the awareness of ex­isting amidst external and internal forces of nature which cause us to feel vulnerable and perhaps powerless. Such natu­ral processes as illness, death, growth and decay, earthquakes, the seasons, confront us with things which are often beyond our ability to control. Considenng the information and re­sources of the times, one of religion’s main functions in the past was the attempted control of the ‘uncertain’ factors in human life, and help towards psychological adjustment to vali­ne rability. Religions were the first social programmes aiding the human need for help and support towards emotional, mental, physical and social health and maturity. Even if prim­itive, such programmes helped groups of people to gain a common identity and live in reasonable harmony together. Like a computer program which is specific to a particular business, such programmes were specific to a particular group, and so are outdated in today’s need for greater integra­tion with other races. Religions also offered some sort of con­cept of and connection with the roots of being.

Example: ‘For two nights running I have dreamt the same nightmare. I am in a chapel walking down the first flight of several flights of steps when I hear loud noises behind me. I am told to run, being warned of the soldiers who ride the cavalry horses nght down the steps, and who run you over if you are in their way.

The horses are fierce and they absolutely race down the steps at the same time every day, and you literally have to lock yourself away in a nearby room which is a long way down the chapel. I ran into the room hearing the pounding of the horses’ hooves. It was a terrible pandemo­nium in that chapel. In the room were school children the same age as me and some perhaps younger’ (Maria H). Maria, who is 16, in describing her dream says she had recently been confronted with whether to have a sexual relationship with her boyfriend. Religion, represented by the chapel, is Maria’s way of locking out her powerful sexual urges. Many dreams show that religion, as a set of beliefs, is used as a way of avoiding anxiety in the face of life’s uncertainties.

For many people, the rigid belief system helps them to avoid uncertainty in making decisions.

Dreams also portray and define the aspect of human expe­rience in which we sense a kinship with all life forms. This is the side of spiritual expenence through which we find a con­nection with the roots of our being. While awake we might see the birth of a colt and feel the wonder of emergence and newness; the struggle to stand up and survive, the miracle of physical and sexual power which can be accepted or feared. In looking in the faces of fellow men and women we see something of what they have done in this strange and painful wonder we call life. We see whether they have been crushed by the forces confronting them; whether they have become ngid; or whether, through some common miracle, they have been able to carry into their mature years the laughter, the crying, the joy, the ability to feel pain, that are the very signs of life within the human soul. These things are sensed by us all, but seldom organised into a comprehensive view of life, and an extraction of meaning. Often it is only in our dreams, through the ability the unconscious has to draw out the signif­icance of such widely divergent expenences, that we glimpse the unity behind phenomena which is an essential of spiritual life, i.e. we all have a life, we breathe, we have come from a mother, so share a universal experience.

Example: To quote J.B. Priestley from his book Rain Upon Godshill: ‘Just before I went to Amenca, dunng the exhausting weeks when I was busy with my Time Plays, I had such a dream, and I think it left a greater impression on my mind than any experience I had ever known before, awake or in dreams, and said more to me about this life than any book I have ever read.

The setting of the dream was quite simple, and owed something to the fact that not long before my wife had visiied the lighthouse here at St Catherine’s to do some bird ringing. I dreamt I was standing at the top of a very high tower, alone, looking down upon myriads of birds all flying in one direction; every kind of bird was there, all the birds in the world. It was a noble sight, this vast aerial river of birds. But now in some mysterious fashion the gear was changed, and time speeded up, so that I saw generations of birds, watched them break their shells, flutter into life, mate, weaken, falter and die. Wings grew only to crumble; bodies were sleek, and then, in a flash bled and shrivelled; and death struck every­where at every second. What was the use of all this blind struggle towards life, this eager trying of wings, this hurried mating, this flight and surge, all this gigantic meaningless ef­fort? As I stared down, seeming to see every creature’s ignoble little history almost at a glance, I felt sick at heart. It would be better if not one of them, if not one of us, had been bom, if the struggle ceased for ever. I stood on my tower, still alone, desperately unhappy. But now the gear was changed again, and the time went faster still, and it was rushing by at such a rate, that the birds could not show any movement, but were like an enormous plain sown with feathers. But along this plain, flickering through the bodies themselves, there now passed a sort of white flame, trembling, dancing, then hurry­ing on; and as soon as I saw it I knew that this white flame was life itself, the very quintessence of being; and then it came to me, in a rocket burst of ecstasy, that nothing mattered, nothing could ever matter, because nothing else was real but this quivering and hurrying lambency of being. Birds, men and creatures not yet shaped and coloured, all were of no account except so far as this flame of life travelled through them. It left nothing to mourn over behind it, what I had thought was tragedy was mere emptiness or a shadow show; for now all real feeling was caught and purified and danced on ecstatically with the white flame of life. I had never before felt such deep happiness as I knew at the end of my dream of the tower and the birds.’

Some Nonh American Indians developed the totem out of similar processes. In one generation a person might learn to plant a seed and eat the results. Later someone might see that through fertilisation more food was produced. Still later some­one found that by irrigating, still more improvement was made. No one individual was responsible for such vital cul­tural information, and the collective information is bigger than any one person, yet individuals can partake of it and add to it.

The totem represented such subtle realities, as it might in a modem dream; as Christ might in today’s unconscious. That older cultures venerated their collective information, and that modem humans seem largely apathetic to it, shows how our ‘religion’ has degenerated. Yet utilising the power of the unconscious to portray the subtle influences which impinge upon us, and building the information gained into our re­sponse to life, is deeply important.

With the growth of authoritarian structures in western reli­gion, and the dominance of the rational mind over feeling values, dreams have been pushed into the background. With this change has developed the sense that visionary dreams were something which ‘superstitious* cultural groups had in the past. Yet thoroughly modem men and women still meet Christ powerfully in dreams and visions. Christ still appears to them as a living being.

The transcendental, the collective or universal enters their life just as frequently as ever before. Sometimes it enters with insistence and power, because a too rational mind has led to an unbalance in the psyche—a bal­ance in which the waking and rational individuality is one pole, and the feeling, connective awareness of the uncon­scious is the other.

Although it is tempting to think of the transcendent as ethereal or unreal, the religious in dreams is nearly always a symbol for the major processes of maturing in human life. We are the hero/ine who meets the dangers of life outside the womb, who faces growth, ageing and death.

The awe and deep emotions we unconsciously feel about such heroic deeds are depicted by religious emotion.

See angel; Christ, rebirth and Devil under archetypes; church; evil; fish, sea creatures; example in whale under fish, sea creatures; heaven, hell; sweets under food; dream as spiritual guide. See also hero/ine; mass; masturbation; old; paralysis; colours; sheep under animals. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Family

1- “flic family is the first basic security image that a child has. Often, through circumstances not within that child’s control, that image becomes distorted, and dreams will either attempt to put this image right or will confirm the distortion. Thus we may dream of an argument with a family member, but the interpretation will depend on both the circumstances of the dream and our everyday relationship with that person. All future relationships are influenced by the ones we first develop within the family.

Psychologically the struggle for individuality should take place within the safety of the family unit. This, however, docs not always happen. In dreams we are able to ‘manipulate’ the images of our family members, so that we can work through our difficulties without harming anyone else (It is interesting to note that one person working on his own dreams can have a profound noticeable cffcct on the interactions and unconscious bondings between other members of his family). Almost all of the problems we encounter in life are reflected within the family, so in times of sUess we will dream of previous problems and difficulties that the family has experienced.

The Spiritual Triangle.

A group in which we feel safe.

Since relationships in the family- are so important, dreams containing family members can have extra significance. Some typical dreams are:

A man’s mother being transformed into another woman

A man’s first closc relationship with a woman is with his mother. Depending on the circumstances of the dream, such a transformation can be either positive or negative. It can be a sign of growth for him to realise, through dream, that he can let mother go. This transformation indicates some change in his perception of women (sec Airima).

A woman’s father, brother or lover turning into someone else Similarly, a woman’s first relationship with the male is usually with her father. She must learn to walk away from that relationship in order to progress onto fuller relationships. When she can handle her Animus (See Introduction), she is ready for that transformation.

A man’s brother or a woman’s sister appearing in a dream often represents the Shadow (See Introduction). Often it is easier to project the negative side of our personalities onto members of the family.

If this projection is allowed to continue, it can cause difficulty with family relationships in later life. Often the solution will present itself in dreams to enable us to come to terms with our own projections. “fhe pattern of aggressions between familv members is fairly typical, but oddly is often easier to work through in dreams than in everyday life.

Dreams about the family figure so prominently because most of the conflicts and problems in life are experienced first within that environment.

It is as though a pattern is laid down which, until it is broken willingly, will continue to appear.

Confusion of family members e.g. mother’s face on father’s body suggests that we may be having problems in deciding which parent is most important to us. Family members suffering from injury or trauma or appearing to be distorted in some way may reflect the dreamer’s fear for, or about, that person.

A family member continually appearing in dreams or, conversely, not appearing when expected The relationship with that person (or the dreamer’s concept of that person) needs to be better understood.

Dreaming of an incestuous relationship may indicate that the dreamer has become obsessed in some way with the other person.

The dream has occurred in order to highlight either the importance or the potential danger - of such a relationship.

Dreamer’s parents crushing the dreamer and thus forcing rebellion. This suggests that the dreamer needs to break away from learnt childhood behaviour and develop as an individual.

Dreaming of a parent’s death can also have the same significance. When a parent appears in our own environment, we will have learnt to change roles within the parent/child relationship and perhaps will accept our parents as friends. Parents behaving inappropriately can indicate our need to recognise that they are only human, and not as perfcct as we had first perceived.

Dreaming of rivalry with one parent When a child is first born, it moves through extreme self- involvement to an exclusive relationship, usually with mother. Onlv later docs he or she becomc aware of the need for a different relationship with a third person. Often this relationship causes the child to question his or her own validity as a person. When this question is not resolved successfully it may persist in the dream image of conflict with a parent.

Dreaming of conflict between a loved one and a member of one’s family The dreamer has not fully differentiated between his needs and desire for each person. Learning how to love outside the family is a sign of maturity.

The figure of a family member intruding in dreams suggests that family loyalties can get in the way within the dreamer’s everyday life. Rivalry between siblings in dreams usually harks back to a feeling of insecurity and doubt, possibly as to whether we are loved enough within the family framework.

Individual members and then- position within the family can symbolise the various archetypes. Thus, father can represent the masculine principle and authority; whereas mother represents the nurturing, protective principle. Brother As already stated, a brother can represent both feelings of kinship and of rivalry. In a man’s dream an older brother can represent experience and authority, while a younger brother suggests vulnerability and possibly lack of maturity. In a woman’s dream, a younger brother can represent a sense of rivalry, but also of vulnerability; whether her own or her brother’s.

An older brother can signify her extrovert self.

Daughter When the relationship with a daughter is highlighted in dreams, it often represents the outcome of the relationship between husband and wife. In a woman’s dream, the relationship with the daughter usually suggests a mutually supportive one although rivalry and jealousy can arise and needs to be dealt with. Sometimes this can safely be done in dreams. In a man’s dream his daughter may represent his fears and doubts about his own ability to handle his vulnerability.

Extended family (such as cousins, aunts, uncles)

Members of the extended family usually appear in dreams either as themselves, or as typifying various parts of ourselves which arc recognisible.

Father If the relationship with father has been successful in waking life, the image of father in dreams will be a positive one. Father represents authority and the conventional forms of law and order. In a man’s life father becomes a role model, whether appropriate or not.

It is often only when the individual realises that he is not being true to his own nature that dreams can point the way to a more successful life. In a woman’s life, father is the ‘pattern’ on whom she bases all later relationships. When she appreciates that she longer need use this pattern. she is often able to work out in dreams a more appropriate way to have a mature relationship.

If the relationship with father has been a difficult or negative one, there mav be some resistance to resolving the various conflicts which will have arisen. Often this can be accomplished in dreams. Grandparents Grandparents appearing in dreams can highlight our attitude to them, but also to the traditions and beliefs handed down by them. It could be said that grandparents do not know whether they have clone a good job of raising their children until their sins and daughters have children of their own.

Husband/Live in partner

Crucial within the husband/wife relationship are the wife’s feelings about her own sexuality and intimacy of body, mind and spirit. Her view of herself will have been formed by her connection with her father, and any subsequent partnering will be coloured by that attachment.

If her doubts and fears about validity are not properly expressed, they will surface in dreams about the loss, or death, of her husband. They may also be projected onto other women’s husbands.

Mother A child’s relationship with mother is pivotal in its development. Largely it is the first relationship which the child develops, and should be perceived by the child as a nurturing, caring one.

If this does not happen, fears and doubts may arise. In a man’s life this may result in continually developing dependent relationships with older women, or denying his right to a relationship completely. In a woman’s life, her relationship with her mother will colour all other relationships. She may find herself pushed into nurturing the needy male, or in forming relationships with both men and women which do not satisfv her basic needs. There arc many ways through dreams of working through relationships with mother, and much can be gained by daring to take this step. Provided one has come to terms with this relationship, much material and spiritual success can be achieved.

Sister The sister in dreams usually represents the feeling side of ourselves. VVe have the ability to make links with that side of ourselves through being able to understand our sister’s personality. In a man’s dream if she is older, the sister can represent the potential for persecution, but also of caring.

If she is younger then she can epitomise the more vulnerable side of him. In a woman’s dream if the sister is younger, she can represent rivalry.

If older she stands for capability. Son The son in dreams can signify the dreamer’s need for self- expression and for extroversion. He can also signify parental responsibility. In a mother’s dream he may represent one’s ambitions, hope and potential. In a father’s dream he can highlight unfulfilled hopes and dreams. Wife/Live in partner The wife/husband relationship is based on how the man perceives himself to be.

If he has previously formed a good, if not successful relationship with his mother, he will attempt to prove himself a good husband through his dreams. He will experience potential loss and death of his partner in the same way as he experienced the ‘loss’ of his mother.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Butterfly

A sign of happiness if you see a gaily coloured Butterfly in the sunshine; but if it is a Moth, and seen indoors, then it means some slight trouble.... Mystic Dream Book

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Mystic Dream Book

Flags

There are different interpretations of this omen in various parts of the world, so it is better to ignore it and study instead the other indications in your dream. Some people consider that the generous display of coloured bunting is a fortunate omen. But all colours are not propitious, so this point is doubtful.

For instance (see COLOURS), Red is generally considered a warning of quarrels with friends, while Black is ominous. There should be plenty of White, Blue, Orange, or Green, if the bunting is to bring good luck.... Mystic Dream Book

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Mystic Dream Book

Map

To dream that you are studying a Map indicates a change of residence, probably also of business or employment.

If the Map is coloured, the omen is a fortunate one.... Mystic Dream Book

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Mystic Dream Book

Sky

whoever saw the sky’s colour as white then there is in that [an indication of]: blessing and fertility.

If he saw it as green then it [means] good.

If he saw it as yellow then [means] disease & sickness.

If he saw it as red, then it [means] war & bloodshed.

If he sees it as black then it [means] famine & distress.

If he sees that the sky is being coloured [then] there will be affliction & a grand trial in that place.... Islamic Dream - Cafer-i Sadik

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Islamic Dream - Cafer-i Sadik

Husband / Live-in Partner

Crucial within the husband / wife relationship are the wife’s feelings about her own sexuality and intimacy of body, mind and spirit. Her view of herself will have been formed by her connection with her father and any subsequent partnering may well be coloured by that attachment.

If her doubts and fears about validity are not properly expressed, they will surface in dreams about the loss, or death, of her husband. Such fears may also be projected onto other women’s husbands, almost as though her own husband is too close to her.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

Indigenous Peoples

Psychological / emotional perspective: Since everybody has their own view of indigenous people, inevitably dreams will be coloured by our conscious awareness. However, as our knowledge of cultures and customs becomes greater the appearance of indigenous people in dreams take on different shades of meaning.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

Balloon

(1) A hot-air balloon in the sky may symbolize either (a desire for) freedom from the problems associated with your daily existence, or the achieving of an objective, detached or more spiritual view of things.

(2) Coloured party balloons may symbolize rejoicing and happiness: something to celebrate.... A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

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A Dictionary of Dream Symbols