Meaning of Woven Dreams | Dream Interpretation

Dream interpretations were found from 1 different sources.


In a woven object (such as fabric or a tapestry), the weaving can represent: Something organized or regular in your life.

Taking an organized or systematic approach in a particular task or way of thinking.

The idea of the whole being greater than the sum of its parts.

The idea of focusing on the “big picture” or focusing on the details (as in viewing the whole scene portrayed by a tapestry, or focusing on its individual threads).

See also: Fabric; Thread; Weaving or Spinning; Mixing; Making or Building

The Curious Dreamer’s Dream Dictionary | Nancy Wagaman


Woven | Dream Meaning

The keywords of this dream: Woven

Mat

(Plaited fabric; Seat; Woven straws) In a dream, a mat represents a servant, or the court of justice. Sitting on a mat in a dream means that one will commit an act which he will regret.

(Also see Straw mat)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Birth

Woman’s dream: desire to have a baby. Man’s dream: envy of the creative ability of women. When we were born, one world of experience ended for us and another began. Binh in a dream has the same meaning.

The beginning of a new way of life; new attitude; new ability; new project. But also the death of the old. Can be about our own physical birth, its difficulties and trauma. But most difficult birth dreams are about coming to terms with our existence. Many of us are still wondering whether we wanted to be, or want to be, born. Lots of us live at a remove from life because of this.

Birth of a shining, talking or holy child: the beginning of awareness (not intellectual knowledge) of how the conscious self is interwoven with the forces and beings of the cosmos. Birth pains: the creative process; pain of arriving at a wider vision. Giving birth to a more mature self is a struggle; the new in our life is born out of such pains. See baby. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Loom

1- A loom in dreams will obviously have a different significance if it is a work tool, or if one is a creative artist. By and large a loom suggests creativity whether more mechanical or craft-oriented. We all have the ability within ourselves to create beautiful objects and the loom is one of these symbols.

2- A loom picks up on the symbol of weaving and the idea of creating our own lives. VVe have certain basic materials which can lay down an elementary pattern, but we must add our own touches which give the individuality to the overall woven object.

The loom is the tool we need to achieve the right pattern.

3- The loom in spiritual terms suggest fate, time, and the weaving of destiny.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Thread

1- Thread in dreams represents a line of thought or enquiry. In terms of our ordinary everyday lives we perhaps need to follow that line to its end. Threading a needle has an obvious sexual reference. It can also, because of the perceived difficulty in threading a needle, suggest incompetence in ways other than sexual.

2- To be aware of thread is to be aware of the way our lives arc going.

A tangled thread suggests a difficulty which needs unravel- ling.

A spool of thread suggests an ordered existence.

The colour of the thread is important (see Colour).

A basket full of spools suggests the various aspects of a woman’s personality. This is because of its association with the Archetypal feminine.

3- The various threads of our spirituality are being interwoven the results of which will go some way to achieving the dreamer’s spiritual wholeness.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Weaving

1- Weaving is a very basic symbol and suggests the need to take responsibility for our own lives.

To be doing any handicraft shows that we have situations in hand.

2- Weaving is taken to signify life itself and often our attitude to the way we run our lives.

3- Weaving is one of the strongest spiritual images there is. In most cultures there is an image of our fate being woven in a particular pattern. VVe are not supposed to be in control of that pattern, but must accept that the gods or God know what is best.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Web

1- In everyday life, we may well be caught up in a situation that could trap us. We could be in a ‘sticky’ situation and not quite know which direction to move. This can result in the symbol of a web appearing in the dream. We are ‘caught in the middle’ or we are trapped. Because the situation is extremely complex we have no idea which way is going to be most advantageous for us.

2- When we dream of a web we arc linking into one of the most basic of spiritual symbols.

It is within the ‘web of life’ that the divine powers have interwoven fate and time in order to create a reality in which we can exist. We are the spiritual entrapped within the physical and not able to escapc back to our own spiritual realm.

3- The spider’s web is the Cosmic Plan.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Fabric

(see Clothes, Needle, Sewing, Wool)

The metaphorical fabric of time, space, and dimensions in which your life represents one strand. Note, however, that each strand touches the others within this iveb directly or indirectly.

The substance of your foundational belief system. How does this fabric appear? Is it finely woven or full of holes?

Patterns in the fabric represent the cycles and patterns within your own life.

For example, regular geometric imprints can indicate a personality that is very ordered and constant.

Frayed fabric is symbolic of something coming apart, but you still have time to stop this progression. Find the loose ends and sew them up!... The Language of Dreams

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The Language of Dreams

Spinning Wheel

Vision: A woman dreaming about a spinning wheel: she will make a good housewife, find a good husband, or both.

A man dreaming about a spinning wheel: a matter is coming to a quick end, but he will think about it for some time to come.

Depth Psychology: You are either enjoying comfort and security at home or you are looking for a life where all pans are woven into a harmonious whole!... Dreamers Dictionary

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Dreamers Dictionary

Braid

Dreams of a braid symbolize integration, unification, synergy, and the weaving together of different aspects of yourself.

If the braid is tight, then there may be fear holding you together.

If the braid is loose, then you are peaceful and comfortable as you blend together your many qualities and talents. Pay attention to what materials are woven into the braid.

If the braid is made of your hair, then you are strengthening of your personal power. See Weave and Goddess Athena.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Tapestry

Dreams of a tapestry reflect your feelings about your life, your past, your experience, your family history, patterns and habits that you have sewn together over time. Tapestries also signify wealth, luxuriousness and prosperity that come from life experiences that you have woven together. See Art.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Loom

Psychological / emotional perspective: A loom picks up on the symbol of weaving and the idea of creating our own lives. We are given certain basic materials that can lay down an elementary pattern, but we must add our own touches through knowledge and experience, which give individuality to the overall ‘woven’ existence.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

Thread

Thread is a vivid image in dreams and in spiritual work. We have the thread of life spun for us by the fates who determine the life and death of all mortal beings; klotho spins the thread; her sister lachesis determines the length of it and atropos cuts the thread when the proper time has come for death.

The various threads of our spirituality are being interwoven into the tapestry of life.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

Weaving

Weaving is one of the strongest spiritual images there is. In most cultures there is an image of our fate being woven in a particular pattern. We are not supposed to be in control of that pattern, but must accept that the gods or god know what is best.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

Web

The spider’s web is the cosmic plan.

It is within the ‘web of life’ that the divine powers have interwoven fate and time in order to create a reality in which we can exist. There is a belief that we are the spiritual entrapped within the physical and not able to ‘escape’ back to our own spiritual realm.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

Do Your Dreams Have A Meaning?

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter. The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us. A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general. In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‘one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm’), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2] As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction. The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated. To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject. But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature -- for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked. In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds: I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‘research workers on dreams’, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‘Les savants ne sont pas curieux’, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it! And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes: Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‘interpretation of dreams’ is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

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About Dream Interpretation

Do Your Dreams Mean Anything?

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems

I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter.

The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us.

A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general.

In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‰_÷one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm‰_ª), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2]

As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction.

The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated.

To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject.

But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature - for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked.

In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds:

I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‰_÷research workers on dreams‰_ª, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‰_÷Les savants ne sont pas curieux‰_ª, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it!

And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes:

Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‰_÷interpretation of dreams‰_ª is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

Read More...

About Dream Interpretation

Tapestry

Design of one’s life; the many experiences woven together to create a life pattern. You see only the knots on the back of the tapestry until death; at that point you look at the design on the front and see its beauty and symmetry.... The Dream Books Symbols

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The Dream Books Symbols

Thread

Experiences woven into tapestry of life; ideas; a thread of truth. See Sew and Weave.... The Dream Books Symbols

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The Dream Books Symbols

Cobweb

Cobwebs spun by spiders could symbolize the trap in which you find yourself in real life. It also represents loneliness, lack of communication, and disputes. On the other hand, if the spider in your dream has woven a beautiful web that you admire upon contemplation, it is a sign that the forces of the universe are in your favor to help you in your projects. Lastly, dreaming that the cobwebs are invading your home reveals that the nostalgia frequently takes over your mind, which impedes you from enjoying the present. You are too worried about events of the past and your energy is dispersed in things that cannot be changed.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

Spider

In the spider three different symbolic meanings converge, and sometimes overlap: creative capacity (the spider weaving its web), aggressiveness (having a predatory instinct), and the fabric itself (such as a spiral net equipped with a center). That said, dreaming of a spider is interpreted in various ways. In most cases, it is a negative dream because the web it weaves symbolizes the trap in which you are about to fall. It also represents loneliness, isolation, and disputes. On the other hand, if the spider has woven a beautiful fabric that produces admiration, it means that the forces of the universe will act in your favor.

It is time to intervene because you are at your full potential. The oneiric spiders can also represent the subject’s fears. Perhaps you feel trapped into a web of deception or agitated emotions. Sigmund Freud believed that spiders were overprotective mothers holding their children (innocent victims) under a sense of possession (web).... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

Spider

A common household spider may symbolize the intricate web that the dreamer has woven or a web that has entrapped the dreamer. Alternatively, it may indicate feeling entangled in a sticky, clinging relationship.... Dream Symbols in The Dream Encyclopedia

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Dream Symbols in The Dream Encyclopedia

Weaving

Weaving is taken to symbolize life itself and the way in which we run our lives. Most cultures contain images in which our fate is being woven in a pattern.

Although at the mercy of chance, we are supposed to be in control of that pattern.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

The Tree Of Life

Spiritually and in dreams, the tree is a symbol of the Tree of Life; an ancient idea common to many cultures and mythologies. Often regarded as an all-nourishing, all-giving Mother, many myths speak of the Tree of Life or World Tree as involved in the creation of the universe.

Britain was once covered by mighty oak, lime and pine forests, and reverence for trees is a major feature within Celtic religion, reflecting a link between the upper and lower worlds. Druids had their teaching center in the midst of oak groves, and the words for wood and wisdom are similar (Welsh gwydd and gwyddon). The Celtic Tree of Life is one of the most popular and enduring motifs of Celtic art, found both on Northumbrian and Celtic crosses and on illuminated manuscripts. It is also portrayed variously as the Golden Bough, vine, or mistletoe. The ancient Celts envisioned the cosmos in the form of a great tree, whose roots were deep in the earth and whose branches stretched to the heavens.

The Celtic Tree of Life is therefore a symbol of balance between these worlds; the unification of above and below; a symbol of balance and harmony. Its branches and roots form a map of the cosmos wherein all things are interwoven and connected; it dwells in three worlds—a link between heaven, earth and the underworld. In dreams the appearance of the Tree of Life or any kind of tree can therefore be a powerful symbol of harmony, success, integration and fulfillment.

These can be achieved in waking life when there is a union between the material and the spiritual, and the feminine and masculine aspects of your personality.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

Fabric

The fabric of a garment, curtain, or other object made from cloth can represent: The image conveyed by the particular type of fabric (for example, velvet as luxurious or cotton as comfortable).

A characteristic conveyed by the fabric’s color, weave, pattern, condition, weight, or otherwise (for example, flowered fabric representing cheerfulness, or dirty fabric representing neglecting yourself).

A characteristic associated with the item that’s constructed of the fabric (for example, denoting a particular climate, generation, culture, nationality, or hobby).

Unused fabric can represent: the raw materials for or input to a creative process; potential, possibility, or opportunity.

See also: Clothes; Woven; Thread; Sewing... The Curious Dreamer’s Dream Dictionary

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The Curious Dreamer’s Dream Dictionary

Making Or Building

Creativity or ingenuity.

Productivity.

Making use of what’s available.

Motivation for change or progress.

Evolution, development, or maturation.

See also: Design or Plan; Factory; Mixing; Woven; Technician or Mechanic; Creativity; Shaping; Support, Architectural... The Curious Dreamer’s Dream Dictionary

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The Curious Dreamer’s Dream Dictionary

Mixing

Mixing things together (or something that’s already mixed) can represent: The idea of mixing whatever is represented in real life by the mixed things, and the results that would follow (such as mixed jelly beans representing the beauty of uniting people with different personalities or backgrounds).

Real or desired creativity, where individual elements or ideas are combined to create something new.

An activity or procedure that involves mixing (such a baking, painting, or composing music).

Synergy, cooperation, or compatibility among two or more elements, people, or groups (or a desire for such).

See also: Chemistry; Making or Building; Agreement; Woven; Cooking; Joining Together; Quilt; Variety; Food... The Curious Dreamer’s Dream Dictionary

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The Curious Dreamer’s Dream Dictionary

Thread

Connection.

Fastening or securing.

Continuity, something that unites, or something in common.

A loose thread on a garment could represent a perceived imperfection.

A neatly wound spool of thread could represent organization or order.

See also: String; Yarn; Rope; Woven; Fabric; Sewing... The Curious Dreamer’s Dream Dictionary

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The Curious Dreamer’s Dream Dictionary

Weaving Or Spinning

A process, activity, or project in which something is created (such as art, music, construction, or building a relationship).

The idea of making something out of nothing (or out of very little).

Complexity, or components that “weave together” or “work together” in harmony.

Uniting or joining things together.

The idea that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.

See also: Woven; Yarn; Knitting; Sewing... The Curious Dreamer’s Dream Dictionary

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The Curious Dreamer’s Dream Dictionary

Web

A spider web can represent: A desire to “catch,” keep, or remember something (an opportunity, experience, etc.).

A perceived trap, or a feeling or fear of being trapped or manipulated.

A business or money-making endeavor.

Random searching (as a web catches anything that comes along).

Cobwebs can represent neglect, emptiness, unoccupied, unused, or an eerie feeling.

See also: Net; Spider; Trapped; Hunting; Woven; Weaving or Spinning; Internet... The Curious Dreamer’s Dream Dictionary

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The Curious Dreamer’s Dream Dictionary