What does it mean to see an unbalance in a dream?

Unbalance Dream Meaning: From 1 Different Sources


(See Delirium; Distraction)

Islamic Dream Interpretation | Ibn Seerin

Unbalance | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Unbalance

Posture

Stooping sickly; unbalanced leaning; prostrate helplessness; bowing with submissive adoration; leaning unstably... posture dream meaning

Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Squirrel

One who acts mentally unbalanced... squirrel dream meaning

Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Delirium

(Distraction; Love; Unbalance) In a dream, delirium represents unbalance, bewilderment about the world, utter confusion, giddiness or falling passionately in love, or it could denote a better end for all things. (Also see Distraction)... delirium dream meaning

Islamic Dream Interpretation

Grammarian

(Linguist; Philologist) Agrammarian in a dream represents preventive medicine, drug prescriptions, avoiding evil pranks, or it could mean a cover for one’s head. A grammarian in a dream also means embellishment of one’s words, making a flowery speech, falsification or exaggeration. Seeing a grammarian in a dream also means balance, unbalance, gossipry, pretension and ostentatiousness. If a falsifier becomes a grammarian in a dream, it means that he will turn truthful and become known for it. Ifhe is a heedless person, it means that he will receive guidance. If he is a sinner, it means that he will repent for his sins. Ifhe stammers, it means that he will prosper after having suffered from poverty. The same interpretation is given for one who suffers from dumbness. If he is sick, it means that he will recover from his illness. (Also see Linguist)... grammarian dream meaning

Islamic Dream Interpretation

Evil

Example: ‘At the top of the stairs is a small door, half opened as if inviting me to go up. I get an overpowering sense of something evil beyond the door just waiting for me’ (Charles M). Usually refers to some of our own urges which we have judged as wrong because of moral values, and thus denied expression. Charles probably feels that what he identi­fies with as himself—his established values and beliefs—is threatened by what he senses beyond the door. Whatever threatens our T or ego is often felt to be evil, even if it is natural urges. The unbalanced and real evils in the world, such as terrorising of individuals and minority groups, can of course be shown as the feeling of evil. Example: %I am lying on the floor in my bedroom with a towel over me. I am trying to hide and protect myself because I am terrified. There are four devils trying to get into my body and take over. My bedroom is going like a whirlpool around me, like evil all around me. I wake in a hot sweat and am terrified to go back to sleep’ (Joanna). Joanna is most likely in conflict with her sexuality—the bedroom. When we fight with our own urges they often feel like external agencies—evil forces—attacking us. Sometimes refers to repressed emotional pain. See aboriginal; devil under archetypes. See also active/ passive. ... evil dream meaning

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Obsessed

We are each obsessed in some degree. Few of us could walk down our road nude, or maybe even without shoes and socks. We take such obsessions for granted and accept them as norms, so we do not feel mentally unbalanced. When a similar power of feeling leads us to behaviour outside the norm we face our own doubts about ourself. Obsession in dreams may illustrate some anxiety, drive or desire which is leading us beyond our accepted norm, or the obsession may be used to escape the real feelings, such as childhood pain, or adult conflict and entrapment. In past cultures the ideas or fears which obsess us would have been described as an evil spirit or ghost taking over the person. This is because the irrational obsession takes hold of us against our will, so this is quite an accurate image. The obsessing factor may still appear in present day dreams in the form of a spirit or demon. ... obsessed dream meaning

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Religion And Dreams

In most ancient cultures, consider­ation and even veneration of dreams played a great pan. Some groups felt that dream life was more real and imponant than waking life. Not only were dreams looked to for information about hunting (Eskimo groups), but also for ways of healing physical and psychological ills (Greek dream temples) and insights into the medicinal properties of herbs, barks and clays (African tribal witchdoctors). Common to most of these groups, and evident in the Old Testament, was also the sense that through dreams one had awareness of the transcendental or supersensible. St Peter’s dream of the sheet and unclean animals was a turning point in the history of western socicty —as was Constantine’s dream of his victory if he used the symbol of Christianity. At its most fundamental, the human religious sense emerges out of several factors. One is the awareness of ex­isting amidst external and internal forces of nature which cause us to feel vulnerable and perhaps powerless. Such natu­ral processes as illness, death, growth and decay, earthquakes, the seasons, confront us with things which are often beyond our ability to control. Considenng the information and re­sources of the times, one of religion’s main functions in the past was the attempted control of the ‘uncertain’ factors in human life, and help towards psychological adjustment to vali­ne rability. Religions were the first social programmes aiding the human need for help and support towards emotional, mental, physical and social health and maturity. Even if prim­itive, such programmes helped groups of people to gain a common identity and live in reasonable harmony together. Like a computer program which is specific to a particular business, such programmes were specific to a particular group, and so are outdated in today’s need for greater integra­tion with other races. Religions also offered some sort of con­cept of and connection with the roots of being. Example: ‘For two nights running I have dreamt the same nightmare. I am in a chapel walking down the first flight of several flights of steps when I hear loud noises behind me. I am told to run, being warned of the soldiers who ride the cavalry horses nght down the steps, and who run you over if you are in their way. The horses are fierce and they absolutely race down the steps at the same time every day, and you literally have to lock yourself away in a nearby room which is a long way down the chapel. I ran into the room hearing the pounding of the horses’ hooves. It was a terrible pandemo­nium in that chapel. In the room were school children the same age as me and some perhaps younger’ (Maria H). Maria, who is 16, in describing her dream says she had recently been confronted with whether to have a sexual relationship with her boyfriend. Religion, represented by the chapel, is Maria’s way of locking out her powerful sexual urges. Many dreams show that religion, as a set of beliefs, is used as a way of avoiding anxiety in the face of life’s uncertainties. For many people, the rigid belief system helps them to avoid uncertainty in making decisions. Dreams also portray and define the aspect of human expe­rience in which we sense a kinship with all life forms. This is the side of spiritual expenence through which we find a con­nection with the roots of our being. While awake we might see the birth of a colt and feel the wonder of emergence and newness; the struggle to stand up and survive, the miracle of physical and sexual power which can be accepted or feared. In looking in the faces of fellow men and women we see something of what they have done in this strange and painful wonder we call life. We see whether they have been crushed by the forces confronting them; whether they have become ngid; or whether, through some common miracle, they have been able to carry into their mature years the laughter, the crying, the joy, the ability to feel pain, that are the very signs of life within the human soul. These things are sensed by us all, but seldom organised into a comprehensive view of life, and an extraction of meaning. Often it is only in our dreams, through the ability the unconscious has to draw out the signif­icance of such widely divergent expenences, that we glimpse the unity behind phenomena which is an essential of spiritual life, i. e. we all have a life, we breathe, we have come from a mother, so share a universal experience. Example: To quote J. B. Priestley from his book Rain Upon Godshill: ‘Just before I went to Amenca, dunng the exhausting weeks when I was busy with my Time Plays, I had such a dream, and I think it left a greater impression on my mind than any experience I had ever known before, awake or in dreams, and said more to me about this life than any book I have ever read. The setting of the dream was quite simple, and owed something to the fact that not long before my wife had visiied the lighthouse here at St Catherine’s to do some bird ringing. I dreamt I was standing at the top of a very high tower, alone, looking down upon myriads of birds all flying in one direction; every kind of bird was there, all the birds in the world. It was a noble sight, this vast aerial river of birds. But now in some mysterious fashion the gear was changed, and time speeded up, so that I saw generations of birds, watched them break their shells, flutter into life, mate, weaken, falter and die. Wings grew only to crumble; bodies were sleek, and then, in a flash bled and shrivelled; and death struck every­where at every second. What was the use of all this blind struggle towards life, this eager trying of wings, this hurried mating, this flight and surge, all this gigantic meaningless ef­fort? As I stared down, seeming to see every creature’s ignoble little history almost at a glance, I felt sick at heart. It would be better if not one of them, if not one of us, had been bom, if the struggle ceased for ever. I stood on my tower, still alone, desperately unhappy. But now the gear was changed again, and the time went faster still, and it was rushing by at such a rate, that the birds could not show any movement, but were like an enormous plain sown with feathers. But along this plain, flickering through the bodies themselves, there now passed a sort of white flame, trembling, dancing, then hurry­ing on; and as soon as I saw it I knew that this white flame was life itself, the very quintessence of being; and then it came to me, in a rocket burst of ecstasy, that nothing mattered, nothing could ever matter, because nothing else was real but this quivering and hurrying lambency of being. Birds, men and creatures not yet shaped and coloured, all were of no account except so far as this flame of life travelled through them. It left nothing to mourn over behind it, what I had thought was tragedy was mere emptiness or a shadow show; for now all real feeling was caught and purified and danced on ecstatically with the white flame of life. I had never before felt such deep happiness as I knew at the end of my dream of the tower and the birds. ’ Some Nonh American Indians developed the totem out of similar processes. In one generation a person might learn to plant a seed and eat the results. Later someone might see that through fertilisation more food was produced. Still later some­one found that by irrigating, still more improvement was made. No one individual was responsible for such vital cul­tural information, and the collective information is bigger than any one person, yet individuals can partake of it and add to it. The totem represented such subtle realities, as it might in a modem dream; as Christ might in today’s unconscious. That older cultures venerated their collective information, and that modem humans seem largely apathetic to it, shows how our ‘religion’ has degenerated. Yet utilising the power of the unconscious to portray the subtle influences which impinge upon us, and building the information gained into our re­sponse to life, is deeply important. With the growth of authoritarian structures in western reli­gion, and the dominance of the rational mind over feeling values, dreams have been pushed into the background. With this change has developed the sense that visionary dreams were something which ‘superstitious* cultural groups had in the past. Yet thoroughly modem men and women still meet Christ powerfully in dreams and visions. Christ still appears to them as a living being. The transcendental, the collective or universal enters their life just as frequently as ever before. Sometimes it enters with insistence and power, because a too rational mind has led to an unbalance in the psyche—a bal­ance in which the waking and rational individuality is one pole, and the feeling, connective awareness of the uncon­scious is the other. Although it is tempting to think of the transcendent as ethereal or unreal, the religious in dreams is nearly always a symbol for the major processes of maturing in human life. We are the hero/ine who meets the dangers of life outside the womb, who faces growth, ageing and death. The awe and deep emotions we unconsciously feel about such heroic deeds are depicted by religious emotion. See angel; Christ, rebirth and Devil under archetypes; church; evil; fish, sea creatures; example in whale under fish, sea creatures; heaven, hell; sweets under food; dream as spiritual guide. See also hero/ine; mass; masturbation; old; paralysis; colours; sheep under animals. ... religion and dreams dream meaning

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Water

Emotions, moods and flow of feeling energy. Because of the nature of water it lends itself to depicting aspects of how we relate to emotions; for instance, one can drown’ in or feel swept away by some emotions, at other times we can feel cleansed and refreshed. It also represents our potential to ex­perience many emotions because water can take any shape or move in so many ways. How we relate to the water shows how we are meeting our emotions and moods. Example: ‘I am in deep water, no evidence that it is the sea. I am wearing my heavy brown coat. I have no fear, no feeling of cold and I pleasantly just sink’ (Mrs B). Mrs B is in her 80s, and is preparing for death in her dreams. The water in her dream has the feeling of being womblike, suggesting that she senses death as a return to a womblike feeling state, with possible rebirth. Example: ‘I was then standing in front of a senes of glass water tanks. I had apparently written an article about the balance between intellect and emotion, which had presented emotion in a way to show its equal value with intellect. The tanks had water flowing through them with a series of valves. This demonstrated the different relationships between intel­lect and emotion. Some tanks were beautifully clear and col­ourful, showing the right balance. The unbalanced ones had weed growing in them. I was then in a lift with a young woman. We moved close together and kissed. This moved my feelings so much I felt a great melting feeling in my abdomen, and a lot of body sensation against her body’ (Anthony F). Anthony’s dream perfectly illustrates how water refers to the emotions and flowing body feelings. Example: ‘I was in a hospital ward—maybe for children. I was there to help them. In the ward was a large oblong tank full of water. I got into the water. I realised all the sick people in the ward bathed in the water—not soap, just immersion. This produced feelings of revulsion. I felt I would take into myself their sickness. I also thought that if I drank the water it would show the patients a positive attitude towards their sick­ness. They would no longer be afraid, and this would be a factor in their healing’ (Anthony F). Another of Anthony’s dreams in which he is looking at how to meet anxious feelings about his health. He sees that a more positive conscious atti­tude heals the childhood fears. Entering water: entering into strong feelings such as might arise in a relationship or new job, sexual relationship, emo­tions which might stand in one’s way—as a deep lake might, or turgid water. Deep water: the deeps of one’s inner life. Hot water: strong emotions—see example in Introduction. Elec­tricity and water: emotions which can generate very powerful reaction to a situation, such as jealousy or anger. Idioms: make water, muddy the waters; tread water, water something down; turn on the waterworks; water under the bridge; hold water, in hot water, head above water; pour cold water onto something. See fluid; river; rain. water creatures See fish, sea creatures. ... water dream meaning

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Scales

1- Scales in a dream suggest the necessity for balance and selfcontrol. Without that balance we cannot make a sensible decision as to potential courscs of action. We must ‘weigh up” all the possibilities. Scales will also suggest standards for instance, standards of behaviour to which we are cxpccted to adhere. We may be weighed and found wanting. If the scales are unbalanced in a dream we need to search our conscience and discover where we are not functioning properly. 2- The type of scale we sec in our dream will us give a more explicit interpretation. For example, Bathroom scales would suggest a more personal assessment than a public machine, whereas a weigh bridge might suggest that we need to take our whole lives into consideration. If thev were doctor’s scales we mav be alerting ourselves to a potential health problem. 3- The Scales of Justice represent balance and harmony, but also good judgement. By association, they also represent the astrological sign of Libra. ... scales dream meaning

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Command

To dream of commanding someone to do something represents a desire to get a grip on an aspect of your behavior and impulses. Perhaps you are being overly willful with an unbalanced egoic attachment to the outcome. Alternatively, this dream may be giving you the message to suit up, show up and take control of your life. See Ten Commandments. ... command dream meaning

Strangest Dream Explanations

Devour

Dreams of being devoured are about feeling overwhelmed or being overpowered by another’s will. If you dream of devouring something or someone, you are taking its energy, seeking superiority and dominion over it. Your dream is giving you the message that without mutuality or equality, you will ultimately find yourself unbalanced and disempowerd. See Eat. ... devour dream meaning

Strangest Dream Explanations

Scales

Psychological / emotional perspective: Scales in a dream suggest the necessity for balance and self-control. Without that balance we cannot make a sensible decision as to potential courses of action. We must ‘weigh up’ all the possibilities. Scales will also suggest standards – for instance, standards of behaviour – to which we are expected to adhere. We may be weighed and found wanting. If the scales are unbalanced in a dream we need to search our conscience and discover where we are not functioning properly in our lives. ... scales dream meaning

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Strip Club

A strip club is an interesting location for a dream because it simultaneously represents elements of both the masculine and the feminine principle in action. It is a place that celebrates the female body and in this way expresses the power of the feminine. The objectification that goes on there indicates elements of the masculine principle in an undeveloped form. Issues of sexuality, seduction, and eroticism are the focus of such a dream setting; however, be willing to also consider that this energy is not in alignment or true integration. Sexual feelings may be pulling at you in an unbalanced way. ... strip club dream meaning

Complete Dictionary of Dreams

Dieting

A dream of abstinence from eating may suggest that you have been taking on too much in waking life. If you dream of being on a diet, you may be telling yourself to limit your emotional involvement in someone or something. If you suddenly ballooned to obesity in your dream or became waif-like and starving, such scenarios all point to poor body image. If you aren’t preoccupied with your weight in waking life, such dreams may suggest a feeling of being dragged down by weighty problems that you long to shed. Or perhaps you are indulging yourself or getting obsessed with a hobby or a job and your waking life has become unhealthily unbalanced. On the other hand, if you are studying, you may feel as if you have taken in so much information that you are fit to burst. If you are too thin in your dream, have you been starved of vital nourishment recently—intellectual, emotional, sexual or spiritual—in waking life? If someone is withholding food from you in the dream or preventing you from eating in some way, they may be the cause of emotional malnourishment or are perhaps trying to protect you from self-destructive habits. If you suffer from food poisoning in your dream, is there anyone you know who might be trying to poison your mind by feeding it toxic thoughts? Or are you poisoning yourself with an unhealthy diet and lifestyle, perhaps with little or no exercise and a high alcohol, nicotine, caffeine, sugar, salt, additive and saturated fat intake?... dieting dream meaning

The Element Encyclopedia

Nightmares And Scary Dreams: Frightening Dreams Are Your Friend

Even Nightmares Have a Helpful Purpose. A nightmare is easy to recognize: You wake up feeling anything from mild fright to a complete terror that can leave you screaming. Yet even dreams that scare you come to help. The topic of a dream may well bring up a serious and intense message. However, the message comes from a friendly source—your own psyche—whose purpose is to help and support you. No matter how serious or scary the subject of the dream, the communication from your psyche is an attempt to help you resolve the matter or get through a challenging situation. WHY A DREAM TURNS INTO A NIGHTMARE. Most nightmares are simply mirrors of your internal fears and anxieties. Paradoxically, as the following reasons explain, it is those very fears and anxieties that “flip” a dream that is otherwise benign into a nightmare. Think of a dream as a carriage transporting a needed insight about an important problem; the carriage is merely a vehicle for the helpful message. However, the topic of the dream terrifies you. The topic could be about a failing relationship or a career that is falling apart. Because of your terror, as you watch the carriage approach, the shadows of your fears make the carriage look scary. You do not notice the carriage is driven by your psyche, who approaches as a friend and just wants to help. One way of coping with an anxiety or fear is to distance yourself from it—to push it away. This is a normal reaction. Yet the very act of distancing yourself from a scary topic that a dream may address is what “transforms” a normal dream image into a scary one. It is like a tasty dish that curdles, and your fear curdles the dream dish. THERE ARE ONLY FRIGHTENED DREAMERS. Though it is natural to run from what scares you, the very act of doing so is what often creates a nightmare. That is why one way of looking at most nightmares is to say, “There are no scary dreams—only frightened dreamers. ” If we could put aside all of our fears, there would be few nightmares or frightening dreams. WHAT CAUSES NIGHTMARES. Mild to severe stress tends to be the main underlying cause of most frightening dreams. • Daily Stress. Daily stress that ramps up your feelings is the most common reason behind a nightmare. • Out-of-Control Fear and Anxiety. Like a wheel spinning out of control, negative emotions can unbalance your perceptions and lead to nightmares. • Emotional Dissonance. The daily push-pull between competing feelings or choices is called “emotional dissonance. ” If making a choice feels so unpalatable and impossible that no choice seems right, the pressure can drive you to the edge. This form of extreme anxiety, related to difficult or impossible choices, often invites nightmares. • Physical or Mental Imbalance. Conditions like fever or depression can produce bad dreams. When the condition passes, the nightmares may disappear. • Traumatic Events. Repeated bad dreams can happen after a painful event that leaves you feeling vulnerable, such as losing a loved one or the loss of a home after a natural disaster. As the psyche tries to digest the pain, the mind may replay the event as a nightmare. Such dreams are the psyche’s attempt to digest the painful feelings while you sleep. As a person heals and increases their coping skills, the bad dreams lessen and eventually disappear. • The Nightmares of Those with an Artistic or Sensitive Temperament. Highly sensitive and creative individuals tune in more deeply to the world’s pain and suffering, and as a result, they often report nightmares. A man at a seminar shared his constant nightmares about war scenes and mangled bodies, even though he lived a normal life and worked as a bus driver. Digging deeper, he began to see that he was tuning in to the daily pain that he saw on the faces of his passengers. Witnessing their distress gave his sensitive heart emotional indigestion, which he experienced as frequent nightmares. • Traumatic Stress. Those with a medical condition called post-traumatic stress disorder, such as combat veterans or rape victims, can have nightmares that are different in content and structure to regular nightmares. Experiencing extreme forms of trauma can produce nightmares that are more severe and that disrupt sleep cycles, which regular nightmares do not. While researching the nightmares of combat veterans, I created presleep stories as a sleep aid that attempts to restore the normal sleep cycles of combat veterans; details are available at InterpretADream. com. NIGHTMARES: THREE TYPESLike other dreams, nightmares can be distinguished by their origin and purpose. The most common nightmares engage your struggle to grow in character and personality. A few bad dreams deal with specific life fears, and fewer still predict actual tragic events. 1: The Most Common Type of Nightmare A NIGHTMARE THAT UNVEILS A NEGATIVE CHARACTER TRAIT. Facing an unpleasant truth about yourself is never easy. Everyone glosses over shortcomings like anger, acting stupid, or failing at something, and no one wants to face a weakness. As a result, when a dream holds up a mirror about a trait that does not jive with your “I am great” image, your normal reaction is to say, “That can’t be me. ” In colloquial terms, such nightmares expose your blind spots, which is an unpleasant experience for everyone. For example, a man had a nightmare about a raging bull charging through his grocery store and wondered if the dream was a warning that vandals would soon raid his premises. Since most dreams are about you—the dreamer, he came to see that the bull was a metaphor for his short temper when dealing with employees. Seeing himself as an out-of-control bull was not easy, but the image produced the desired effect. The man softened his attitude and as a result, the atmosphere at the grocery store became more relaxed and as a bonus, his sales improved. When a nightmare acts as a mirror of a not-so-great trait, it invites you to grow into a better version of yourself. After an initial “ouch,” you realize that the dream is an ally, helping you correct what could cause problems down the road. 2: A Scary Dream That You Meet Less Often FRIGHTENING DREAMS THAT PORTRAY ACTUAL, SPECIFIC FEARS. One of the functions of dreaming is to process your emotions. When a fear gets out of hand, a nightmare that relates to that fear is the equivalent of a pressure cooker’s safety valve that allows the hot steam to escape. In this case, the experience of having the nightmare, in and of itself, becomes an outlet for your exploding feelings. Acting like an emotional digestion system, fear-processing nightmares let you experience a fear as an external picture that your mind can examine and label. A “see it, name it, and label it” nightmare helps you digest your fear, and as a result, whatever tied you up in knots begins to unravel. Such nightmares handle actual fears, one piece at a time, until they disappear. You may encounter a sequence of nightmares during a time of enormous challenge such as a divorce or the sudden loss of a loved one. Then one day, a morning arrives when you feel a sense of peace. You do not know why you feel better, but you know you have turned a corner. Your dream digestion system—that you experienced as nightmares—has done its work. Nightmares that deal with true fears come with a bonus. A bad dream that relates to a painful issue can include an insight about how to handle what frightens you. A woman kept dreaming of a terrified young girl who walks to the edge of a murky black pond in the middle of the night. As she is about to fall into the deep black water, she sees a light in the distance and becomes aware that the light can lead her to safety. Upon discussion, those images brought back memories of the dreamer’s terror of being raped as a young girl. The light in the distance made her realize that she could resolve the unexpressed pain that had been festering for years. Thanks to the dream’s metaphor of a distant light as a place of safety, the dreamer became aware that she needed a counselor who could help her confront the emotional leftovers of her childhood trauma. 3: Actual Warnings—A Rare Type of Frightening Dream FRIGHTENING DREAMS AS TRUE WARNINGS. Most scary dreams are stress-related, a few may tussle with your actual fears, while a miniscule percent can be actual warnings about something dire. Nightmares can warn you about the possibility of a real tragedy that may involve death, serious illness, or a natural disaster—whether in your life, someone around you, or in your community. Or sometimes they are warnings about less serious matters. LESS URGENT, YET TRUE WARNING DREAMS. Before examining frightening dreams that are dire warnings, let’s take a look at dreams that address issues which are not life threatening, yet still urgent. For example, a dream may give you a heads up about how your words hurtfully impacted another’s feelings that you missed, and as a painful issue, it becomes cloaked in scary images. Or, a dream may point out what will happen if you keep eating three desserts a day; seeing what you look like in a dream, with an extra fifty pounds on you, can be pretty scary. Or, a frightening dream may point out a topic such as an unpleasant relationship, that you have put on hold, which now needs attention. Because these less urgent issues deal with topics that make you anxious, the warning dream can still be experienced as a nightmare. Such not-so-dire warning dreams touch upon intense topics that are not life threatening, but can still intensely shake you up. DREAM EXAMPLE: A FRIGHTENING DREAM ABOUT A NORMAL ISSUE—MY DAUGHTER IS IN A CAR CRASH. A mother dreamed that her daughter was in a car crash, and from a distance, she watched as her child was taken to the hospital. Afterward, a doctor announced that her daughter was okay. The dream felt so intense that the mother woke up terrified, fearing for her daughter’s safety. The mother brought up her dream at a conference. A conversation brought out how, at the time of the dream, her only daughter announced that she was about to relocate because her new husband had been transferred to a job a thousand miles away. Since mom and daughter had never lived more than a few streets apart, the mother experienced a nightmare that registered her shock and distress at the news. Nothing terrible had happened. The nightmare simply registered the mother’s reaction to the sudden, unexpected news of being separated from her daughter. A TRUE WARNING NIGHTMARE ABOUT A POTENTIAL TRAGEDY. Though extremely rare, a nightmare can be a warning about an actual tragedy as a type of ESP dream, as in the following example. DREAM EXAMPLE: A NIGHTMARE AS A TRUE WARNING—MY DAUGHTER IS IN A CAR CRASH. Another mother had several dreams that showed her only teenage daughter getting into a car with friends, then seeing the car in a deadly crash. Each time she had the dream, she debated whether to talk to her daughter about safe driving with her teenage friends but decided against it. Sadly, the repetitive dreams turned out to be an actual warning and she lost her only daughter. Meeting this woman at a seminar, I marveled at the grace with which the mother had resolved to learn about dreams, and to use future warnings for herself and loved ones. That took great courage. Only the divine hand can know whether a tragedy foreshadowed in a dream can be averted. However, no matter how a predicted event turns out, such actual warning nightmares serve a constructive purpose. On the one hand, they give a dreamer time to build up their strength and cushion the shock of the actual event, if it comes about. On the other hand, according to stories exchanged in dream circles, such warning dreams can, at times, avert the real danger. True dream warnings about dire events are extremely rare. They have noticeable features like repetition, intense emotions and literal details. For more examples of nightmares and frightening dreams of every kind, have a look at the e-library of dreams at InterpretADream. com which is searchable by keyword. ... nightmares and scary dreams: frightening dreams are your friend dream meaning

A Little Bit Of Dreams

Hamburger

1. Fast food/ Sermon;2. Unbalanced nutrition/living on devotions; Heb. 5:12-14... hamburger dream meaning

Dream Dictionary The Biblical Model