Told | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Told

Birth

For a married woman to dream of giving birth to a child, great joy and a handsome legacy is foretold.

For a single woman, loss of virtue and abandonment by her lover.... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Box

Opening a goods box in your dream, signifies untold wealth and that delightful journeys to distant places may be made with happy results.

If the box is empty disappointment in works of all kinds will follow.

To see full money boxes, augurs cessation from business cares and a pleasant retirement. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Chalk

For a woman to dream of chalking her face, denotes that she will scheme to obtain admirers.

To dream of using chalk on a board, you will attain public honors, unless it is the blackboard; then it indicates ill luck.

To hold hands full of chalk, disappointment is foretold. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Death

To dream of seeing any of your people dead, warns you of coming dissolution or sorrow. Disappointments always follow dreams of this nature.

To hear of any friend or relative being dead, you will soon have bad news from some of them. Dreams relating to death or dying, unless they are due to spiritual causes, are misleading and very confusing to the novice in dream lore when he attempts to interpret them.

A man who thinks intensely fills his aura with thought or subjective images active with the passions that gave them birth; by thinking and acting on other lines, he may supplant these images with others possessed of a different form and nature. In his dreams he may see these images dying, dead or their burial, and mistake them for friends or enemies. In this way he may, while asleep, see himself or a relative die, when in reality he has been warned that some good thought or deed is to be supplanted by an evil one.

To illustrate: If it is a dear friend or relative whom he sees in the agony of death, he is warned against immoral or other improper thought and action, but if it is an enemy or some repulsive object dismantled in death, he may overcome his evil ways and thus give himself or friends cause for joy. Often the end or beginning of suspense or trials are foretold by dreams of this nature. They also frequently occur when the dreamer is controlled by imaginary states of evil or good.

A man in that state is not himself, but is what the dominating influences make him. He may be warned of approaching conditions or his extrication from the same. In our dreams we are closer to our real self than in waking life.

The hideous or pleasing incidents seen and heard about us in our dreams are all of our own making, they reflect the true state of our soul and body, and we cannot flee from them unless we drive them out of our being by the use of good thoughts and deeds, by the power of the spirit within us. See Corpse. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Eagles

To see one soaring above you, denotes lofty ambitions which you will struggle fiercely to realize, nevertheless you will gain your desires.

To see one perched on distant heights, denotes that you will possess fame, wealth and the highest position attainable in your country.

To see young eagles in their eyrie, signifies your association with people of high standing, and that you will profit from wise counsel from them. You will in time come into a rich legacy.

To dream that you kill an eagle, portends that no obstacles whatever would be allowed to stand before you and the utmost heights of your ambition. You will overcome your enemies and be possessed of untold wealth. Eating the flesh of one, denotes the possession of a powerful will that would not turn aside in ambitious struggles even for death. You will come immediately into rich possessions.

To see a dead eagle killed by others than yourself, signifies high rank and fortune will be wrested from you ruthlessly.

To ride on an eagle’s back, denotes that you will make a long voyage into almost unexplored countries in your search for knowledge and wealth which you will eventually gain. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Epidemic

To dream of an epidemic, signifies prostration of mental faculties and worry from distasteful tasks. Contagion among relatives or friends is foretold by dreams of this nature. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Fates

To dream of the fates, unnecessary disagreements and unhappiness is foretold.

For a young woman to dream of juggling with fate, denotes she will daringly interpose herself between devoted friends or lovers. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Fish-pond

To dream of a fish-pond, denotes illness through dissipation, if muddy.

To see one clear and well stocked with fish, portends profitable enterprises and extensive pleasures.

To see one empty, proclaims the near approach of deadly enemies.

For a young woman to fall into a clear pond, omens decided good fortune and reciprocal love.

If muddy, the opposite is foretold.... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Fortune-telling

To dream of telling, or having your fortune told, it dicates that you are deliberating over some vexed affair, and you should use much caution in giving consent to its consummation.

For a young woman, this portends a choice between two rivals. She will be worried to find out the standing of one in business and social circles.

To dream that she is engaged to a fortune-teller, denotes that she has gone through the forest and picked the proverbial stick. She should be self-reliant, or poverty will attend her marriage. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Hash

To dream you are eating hash, many sorrows and vexations are foretold. You will probably be troubled with various little jealousies and contentions over mere trifles, and your health will be menaced through worry.

For a woman to dream that she cooks hash, denotes that she will be jealous of her husband, and children will be a stumbling block to her wantonness. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Hieroglyphs

Hieroglyphs seen in a dream, foretells that wavering judgment in some vital matter may cause you great distress and money loss.

To be able to read them, your success in overcoming some evil is foretold. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Latch

To dream of a latch, denotes you will meet urgent appeals for aid, to which you will respond unkindly.

To see a broken latch, foretells disagreements with your dearest friend. Sickness is also foretold in this dream. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Minuet

To dream of seeing the minuet danced, signifies a pleasant existence with congenial companions.

To dance it yourself, good fortune and domestic joys are foretold.... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Negro

To dream of seeing a negro standing on your green lawn, is a sign that while your immediate future seems filled with prosperity and sweetest joys, there will creep into it unavoidable discord, which will veil all brightness in gloom for a season.

To dream of seeing a burly negro, denotes formidable rivals in affection and business.

To see a mulatto, constant worries and friction with hirelings is foretold.

To dream of a difficulty with a negro, signifies your inability to overcome disagreeable surroundings. It also denotes disappointments and ill fortune.

For a young woman to dream of a negro, she will be constrained to work for her own support, or be disappointed in her lover.

To dream of negro children, denotes many little anxieties and crosses.

For a young woman to dream of being held by a negro, portends for her many disagreeable duties. She is likely to meet with and give displeasure. She will quarrel with her dearest friends. Sickness sometimes follows dreams of old negroes.

To see one nude, abject despair, and failure to cope with treachery may follow. Enemies will work you signal harm, and bad news from the absent may be expected.

To meet with a trusty negro in a place where he ought not to be, foretells you will be deceived by some person in whom you placed great confidence. You are likely to be much exasperated over the conduct of a servant or some person under your orders. Delays and vexations may follow.

To think that you are preaching to negroes is a warning to protect your interest, as false friends are dealing surreptitiously with you.

To hear a negro preaching denotes you will be greatly worried over material matters and servants are giving cause for uneasiness. See Mulatto. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Tail

To dream of seeing only the tail of a beast, unusual annoyance is indicated where pleasures seemed assured.

To cut off the tail of an animal, denotes that you will suffer misfortune by your own carelessness.

To dream that you have the tail of a beast grown on you, denotes that your evil ways will cause you untold distress, and strange events will cause you perplexity. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Treasures

To dream that you find treasures, denotes that you will be greatly aided in your pursuit of fortune by some unexpected generosity.

If you lose treasures, bad luck in business and the inconstancy of friends is foretold. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Whistle

To hear a whistle in your dream, denotes that you will be shocked by some sad intelligence, which will change your plans laid for innocent pleasure.

To dream that you are whistling, foretells a merry occasion in which you expect to figure largely. This dream for a young woman indicates indiscreet conduct and failure to obtain wishes is foretold.... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Angels

(Celestial beings; Heavenly beings) If one sees the heavenly angels (arb. Malii’ika) coming before him to congratulate him in a dream, it means that God Almighty has forgiven that person his sins and endowed him with patience, through which he will attain success in this life and in the hereafter.

If one sees the heavenly angels greeting him or giving him something in the dream, it means that his insight will grow. or that he maybe martyrized. Ifone sees angels descending upon a locality that is raging with a war in a dream, it means that the dwellers of that place will win victory.

If the people are suffering from adversities, it means that their calamities will be lifted. Flying with angels or visiting the heavens in their company in a dream may mean that one will die in the station of a martyr and receive God’s utmost blessings.

If one feels scared of the angels in his dream, it means that a fight, an argument or awesome trials will befall that locality. In general, to see the angels descending from the heavens to the earth in a dream means enfeeblement of those who have doubt, and strength for those who have faith and certitude.

If one sees the angels prostrating to him in a dream, it means that all his needs will be satisfied and he will be endowed with good conduct, good behavior and a blessed fame.

If one sees them looking like women in the dream, it means that he lies before God Almighty.

If a pious person sees an angel telling him in a dream “Read God’s Book.” It means that one will attain happiness in his life.

If an impious person sees an angel in a dream telling him “Read your own records.” It means that he may goastray. Ifone sees the angels givinghim glad tidings andcongratulating him in a dream, it means that he will beget a blessed son who will grow to be righteous and an example to be followed. Ifone sees a gathering of angels in a town in his dream, it means that a pious man, or an ascetic, or a great scholar will die in that locality.

If one sees himself looking at the angels in the skies in a dream, it means that he may suffer the loss of a son or his wealth. Seeing the celestial angels (arb. Ruhaniyyeen) in a dream means gaining honor, dignity, blessings in one’s life, profits and a good fame, developing spiritual inner insight, or becoming a business manager. Near the end of one’s life, one who sees such a dream also will suffer from people’s slander and backbiting. He will also lose his good reputation to people’s envy and evil qualities and he will live in tight financial conditions.

If one becomes an angel in a dream, it means tat he will receive honor, power, overcome his adversities, dispel his distress and win his freedom, or it could mean that he will rise in station.

If one sees the angels greeting him and shaking hands with him in a dream, it means that God IAlmighty will endow him with wisdom, clarity and insight. Angels in a dream also represent one’s closest witnesses, guardians, police officers or the emissaries of a ruler. Wrestling with an angel in a dream means loss of status. Wrestling with an angel in a dream also means suffering from distress, trouble, humiliation and falling in rank. Seeing angels entering one’s house in a dream means that a thief will burglarize such a house.

If angels disarm someone in a dream, it means that he will lose his wealth and strength, or that he may divorce his wife.

If angels offer the person a tray of fruits in the dream, it means that he will depart from this world as a martyr.

If angels curse someone in a dream, it means that he has little care for his religion. Ifone sees a gathering of heavenly angels together with the angels of hell-fire in a dream, it means enmity and divisiveness.

If a sick person sees himself struggling with an angel in a dream, it is a sign of his death. Ifone sees an angel taking the form of a child in a dream, it represents one’s future.

If he sees an angel as a youth, the youth then represents the present time and whatever events that will take place during it.

If the angel appears in the form of an old man in the dream, he represents the past.

If one sees the angels praying and asking for God’s forgiveness on his behalf in a dream, it means that one’s spiritual and religious life will grow for the better, and that he will become wealthy.

If one sees angels descending upon a cemetery in a dream, it signifies the presence of blessed and righteous souls in that place. Ifone sees angels walking in the markets in a dream, it means that the merchants are trifling with prices and playing with the measures.

If the angels who are in charge of punishing the sinner in hell walk before a dying person and he does not fear them in the dream, it means peace and tranquility.

If one sees the angels teaching a dying person how to recite his final rites in a dream, it means glad tidings and attainment of what his heart desires, a guarantee of his safety, happiness, joy and of having a blessed and a good heart. Ifhe sees them angry with him or beating him or subduing and taming him in a dream, it means that he may revert to sin, earn the displeasure of his parents, disdain from complying with God’s commands, or he could even come to deny the necessity of God’s religion. Such angels in a dream also represent the emissaries of a governor or his deputies.

If a dying person is told in the dream that no angels have come to see him, then it is a testimony of his good character and piety, or it could mean payment of one’s debts or recovering from an illness. Angels in a dream also could represent scholars, gnostics or translators who understand people’s languages and speak in many tongues. As for Munkar and Nakir, the angels who come to one’s grave upon his burial to question him, seeing them in a dream means prosperity for a poor person, and finding work for a jobless person.

(Also see Castration)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Black Coins Contained In A Bag

If a person sees himself as receiving black coins contained in a bag or pocket, it means a secret will be told to him which he will guard as a trust to his utmost ability.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Dream Interpreter

In a dream, a dream interpreter represents happiness for a sad person and sorrow for a happy person.

If one who desires to maintain secrecy around his life and goals sees a dream interpreter in his dream, it means that he will find an intimate friend or a confidant to complete his intention.

If one is expecting news from an associate or if someone in a different land sees a dream interpreter in his dream, it means that he will receive the desired news.Adream interpreter in a dream also represents knowledge of sings, deciphering messages, analyzing substances, a tracer, a religious scholar, a lawyer, a good advisor, a compassionate friend, ajudge or a physician.

A dream interpreter in a dream also represents someone who does not keep a secret or someone who brings people both happy or sad news. In a dream, he is also a preacher, an advisor, one who balances things, a money changer, a garment cleaner, an undertaker, a barber, a comedian, a news broadcaster or someone who searches for people’s faults. Seeing oneself as a dream interpreter in a dream, and if one qualifies to sit on the bench, it means that he will become ajudge.lfhe is seeking knowledge, he will acquire it.

If he is seeking to become a physician, he will become one. Otherwise, he might become a money changer, a banker or any of the earlier mentioned trades. Telling a dream interpreted a dream in one’s dream, and if the explanation agrees with the common wisdom and religious norms of the Holy Qur’an and the traditions of God’s Prophet, upon whom be peace, then whatever one is told in his dream is true. Ifone does not understand the explanation of the dream interpreter in his dream, then he might need to find a qualified interpreter in wakefulness to satisfy his needs.

(Also see Astrologer; Divination; Fortuneteller; Founder; Interpretation; Seer)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Earth

(Country; Farm; Floor; Glob; Land; Locality; Place; Property) In a dream, each locality has a particular meaning that relates to its substance and conditions.

To see the land of the great gathering on the Day of Resurrection in a dream means the fulfillment of a promise, or that the person seeing the dream is worthy of keeping secrets. Earth in a dream also means becoming rich after poverty, or having peace after experiencing extreme difficulties. It also means a marriage to a beautiful young virgin, or it could mean receiving guidance and attaining a high ranking and an honorable position in the world.

To see the glob being carried on the back of a whale or a steer without changing its conditions in a dream means that the king of the country will be dethroned. He will either step down or be replaced by his minister. Sweeping the floor and caring for the floor mat or carpet in a dream means to care for one’s community or family. Earth in a dream also represents one’s mother, or the governor of the land. Working in a farmland in a dream, seeing its tools, elements, seeds, water, plowing, harvesting, landscaping, blossoming of its flowers, their fragrance, light, whatever positive or negative results one sees therein in a dream represent such success or failure. Seeing an unknown land could denote one’s mother, child, husband, wife, partner, guardian, a servant, or it could mean one’s heirs. Earth in a dream also may mean arguments, knowledge or clarity of speech. Earth in a dream also represents the element of the world, as the skies represent the element of the hereafter. Ifboth the earth and the skies are seen simultaneously in a dream, it means that they can never be joined together, as the world and the hereafter do not exist in one place.

If the top soil of the land is cracked in a dream, it means that the land is rich and arable. Such cracks in a dream also signify the rise of invented religious dogmas and the spread of evil and innovation. Seeing the stretch of the land in a dream means the release of prisoners, or in the case of a pregnant woman, it means the nearing of her delivery.

If one sees an earthquake and the destruction of life and property in a dream, this element represents straying from the path, pride and heedlessness. Ifthe earth appears to fold over him in a dream, it means losingone stature in the world, divorce orlosing in business.

If the earth changes into iron or rocks in one’s dream, it means that one’s wife will not bear children, or it could mean changing one’s trade or profession.

If the earth opens and swallows him in a dream, it means that he is ashamed of somethinghe did, or it could mean hurdles in one’s business, a journey, or imprisonment.

If the earth looks like a desert land in the dream, it may mean that such a person may undertake an urgent trip. Beating the ground with a stick in a dream means taking a business trip. Eating dirt in a dream means earnings an equal amount of money to what one eats in his dream. Ifthe earth cracks and opens, and if a beast comes and speaks to the people in their own tongue in a dream, it means that people will witness a miracle or a happening that will bewilder everyone. This may also mean nearing the end of one’s life. Digging the earth in a dream also means plotting and deceiving others.

If the earth speaks good words to someone in the dream, it means that he or she will attain whatever they are told. On the other hand, if the earth reprimands someone in the dream, it means that he must amend his actions for the better and ask for God’s forgiveness and guidance.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Fountain

In a dream, a fountain placed in a suitable place or as a decorative item in the middle of a yard or a park represents honor, dignity, dispelling worries or adversities, hearing good news or listening to good music, squandering money, dispersal of one’s interests, breaking a gathering, or adding and subtracting if seen near an accountant.

A fountain in a dream also means avoiding evil actions.

If one is told that such a fountain is a blessed one in the dream, it means the opposite, and should one wash himself with its water or drink from it in a dream, it means depression and trouble.

A fountain in a dream also could represent a beautiful, rich and a noble woman.

If no water is coming from the fountainhead in the dream, then it represents a poor woman or a barren woman.

(Also see Fountainhead; Spring)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Happiness

(Elation; Excitement; Joy) In general, happiness in a dream means sorrow.

To be happy about something which the heart does not feel comfortable with, or which the heart does not qualify as correct conduct or behavior in a dream means sadness and sorrow in wakefulness. Happiness in a dream also means being indifferent about following God’s commands.

If one’s happiness in his dream is derived from the release of a prisoner or the recovery of a sick person, then it means positive changes in one’s life. Ifone is told something that is supposed to make him happy, when in fact it made him sad in the dream, such as being told in a dream that so and so hasjust arrived from a longjourney, when in fact such person has just died, it means that his sadness will be dispelled and his sorrows removed. Feeling happy in a dream means sadness, sorrow, or crying. Ifone sees his friends happy in a dream, then it means happiness for him too.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Qur’an

(Garden; Holy Book; The Last Revelation) In a dream, the holy Qur’an represents a garden because when one looks at it, it looks like a beautiful garden and its verses are the fruit of knowledge and wisdom the reader can pluck. Learning a Qur’anic verse, a saying of God’s Prophet (uwbp), a prophetic tradition, or a craft in a dream means richness after poverty, or guidance after heedlessness.

If one sees himself in a dream reading from the pages the holy Qur’an, it signifies honor, command, happiness and victory. Reciting the Qur’an by heart and without reading the pages of the holy Book in a dream means proving to be true, or having a true claim, being pious, commandingwhat is good and forbidding what is evil. Ifone is told a verse from the holy Qur’an in a dream, he should understand it, memorize it and comply with the same.

If the verse reads about mercy or glad tidings or other admonitions in the dream, the interpretation of one’s dream should be the same. Ifthe Qur’anic verses recited in the dream connote an advice, one should act upon it in order for him to reap its benefits.

If one hears a Qur’anic verse containing a warning, promising punishment for the disbelievers, or announcing a swift retribution for their sins, then one should immediately repent for his sins, even if the verses relate to previous nations or times.

If one sees himself reciting the Qur’an and understandingwhat it says in a dream, it denotes his vigilance, intelligence, faith and spiritual awareness.

If a Qur’anic verse is recited to someone, and ifhe does not agree with the divine judgement in the dream, it means that he will suffer harm from someone in authority, or that a punishment from God Almighty will soon befall him.

If an unlettered person sees himself reading the holy Qur’an in a dream, it could also mean his death, or his reading of his own records. Ifone sees himself reading the holy Qur’an without true interest in it in a dream, it means that he follows his own mind, personal interpretations and innovations.

If one sees himself eating the pages of the holy Qur’an in a dream, it means that he earns his livelihood from his knowledge of it. Ifone sees himself completing the reading of the entire Qur’an in a dream, it means that a splendid reward from his Lord is awaiting him, and that he will get whatever he asks for.

If a disbeliever sees himself reading the holy Qur’an in a dream, the verses of admonition will help him in his life, the verses of punishment will be his warning from God Almighty and the parables will denote his need to contemplate the meaning.

If one sees himself writing the verses of the holy Qur’an on slabs of a mother of pearl, or on a piece of cloth in a dream, it means that he interprets it according to his own liking.

If one sees himself inscribing a Qur’anic verse on the ground in a dream, it means that he is an atheist.

It is also said that reading the Qur’an in a dream means fulfillment of one’s needs, clearing of one’s heart and establishment of one’s success in his life.

If one discovers that he has memorized the Qur’an in a dream, though in wakefulness he has not memorized it, it means that he will own a large property. Hearing the verses of the holy Qur’an in adreammeansthe strengtheningofone’s power, reaching a praiseworthy end to his life, and that one will be protected from the envy and jealousy of evildoing people.

If a sick person sees himself reciting a verse from the holy Qur’an, but could not remember to what chapter it belongs in the dream, it means that he will recover from his illness. Licking the holy Qur’an in a dream means that one has committed a major sin. Reciting the holy Qur’an in a dream means increase in one’s good deeds and rising in his station.

(Also see Holy Book; Pearl necklace; Reading)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Reins

(Bridle; Harness) In a dream, reins represent mastery of one’s craft, control of his trade, or it could signify power and a strong financial standing. Reins in a dream also represent a coachman, or the driver who never disobeys his master, and who goes wherever he is told to go. Riding on a workhorse who is fitted with a harness, or on a bridled nag in a dream means occupying an important office and letting everyone who works for the leader make an oath of allegiance before hiring them for work.

If the bridle and the martingale are unadorned in the dream, then such a dream represents a humble person, and connotes that his heart is better than what his outer look may suggest. Reins in a dream also connote safety or a safety belt. Wearing a harness in a dream means safety, and that one does not interfere with others’ business or talk about them. However, should one who has to appear in court see himselfwearing a harness in a dream, it means that his proof will not be accepted by the judge, and subsequently he will lose his case. Ifthe reins of one’s horse are broken in a dream, it could mean the death of his driver. Reins in a dream also denote chastity, guardianship and protection. They also represent the obligatory payment of alms tax which cleanses and protects one’s capital.

If the reins or the harness fall from one’s hand in the dream, it means corruption in one’s religious life, a decline in his devotion, or that one’s wife will become unlawful to him (i.e., living together after a divorce), or that she will remain in his house without a legal marriage.

To see oneself bridled in a dream also means refraining from sin, or observing a voluntary religious fast.

A broken bridle in a dream is good for one who service it and bad for its owner.

(Also see Bridle)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Testator

(See Legal guardian) testator in a dream, it has six interpretations either that what he is told is true, or that he maybe put in charge of an important project, thus, it represents rising in rank, increase in knowledge, celebrating forty years of age, a blessing of a spiritual attainment, or protection from sin.

(Also see Sponsorship)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Deer 

As like with most other animals, the deer in your dream may represent some aspect of your intuition or it may be a message from your unconscious. In some parts of Asia, deer are considered to be conductors of soul and thus the robes of shamans are usually made out of deerskin.

The Indians of North and South America also gave deer a spiritually important role. They believed that the souls of men passed into deer at the time of death. They also believed that a dying deer was a negative omen, which usually represented droughts that in turn foretold of very difficult times ahead. In the modern world, we generally see deer as gentle forest animals. Deer are characters in children’s stories and Santa Clause uses them to bring gifts to all. Thus, the deer in your dream may be a symbol of gentle and helpful parts of your psyche. In order to understand the message of the dream, think about what situation in your life would benefit from gentleness and soul fullness?... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

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The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Sage

Honor and advancement are here foretold (Raphael). ... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

Salt

Wisdom is here foretold (Gypsy). Salt is the symbol of wisdom, and of wit. See Attic Salt, etc.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

Elephant

An elephant in your dream may represent knowledge, power, and strength.

It is also associated with long memory and “thick skin”. You may be making efforts to remember something important and of great magnitude.

If the elephant is pleasant and friendly you will have good luck in what you are undertaking to do.

If you are riding the elephant, you will have much success.

If you see an elephant performing, as in a circus, you will be surrounded by happy, loving people.

If you see the elephant working, you will have success above your wildest dreams. Another meaning of the elephant dream has to do with whether or not you are seeking answers, or go to sleep with a particular problem on your mind, in which case the elephant denotes the key to knowledge and truth, and after sight of the elephant you will be told the answer.... Tryskelion Dream Interpretation

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Tryskelion Dream Interpretation

Abdomen

Example: The people watching are saying “Kill her! Kill her! Kill her!” Then someone finds an extra bullet, puts it in the gun and shoots me in the stomach. I wake with my body completely straight with my hands on my stomach. I feel my whole body cracking up inside’ (Vanessa). Almost half the dreams on file which mention abdomen, belly or stomach show the dreamer being shot, as in the example. This is obviously to do with a particular type of hurt. When human beings learned to stand up, they exposed their vulner­able underbelly.

If we are hurt or threatened we tense the pelvic and abdominal area. Vanessa wakes to just such ten­sion, with a sense of her body being fragmented.

The opposite is to dream of waves of pleasure moving within us, which gives us a sense of integration within ourself and with the world.

In general the abdomen represents the potential of our fully active natural drives—hunger, longing to be held; desire to give of ourself.

If these are hurt, we tend to hold ourself back from active social expression or intimacy of feelings in relationships. Our abdomen is also our digestive ability, both physical and psychological. Stomach or abdominal dreams may refer to some dis-ease in the actual organs. We might not be able to stomach something we have met in the everyday world.

To vomit: a discharging of unpleasant feelings resulting from ingesting (hearing, reading, being told, experiencing) something unpleasant.

In her dream Vanessa was re-enacting the Hungerford di­saster, and feeling the fear it engendered. Shot in the belly, sex; painful response to relationship. Idioms: bellyaching; have a bellyful; eyes bigger than one’s belly, have a strong stomach; turn one’s stomach; butterflies in stomach. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Abscess

Example: ‘Was looking at my knuckle and saw that I had a nasty boil which had come away as I did the washing up and all that was left was a big hole, pink and healthy looking skin around. It felt very close to my knuckle bone.

(My lover had told me he was leaving me for good, and going back to his children. That evening, I cried most of the night.)(Hilary K). In Hilary’s case the abscess has released its pus, or painful feelings, perhaps through her prolonged crying. Ab­scess still swollen and unrelieved: emotions still repressed and may be causing psychological infection, influencing views and decisions negatively.

The emotions are, with Hilary, af­fecting her grasp’. She also uses other imaged word play in ‘near the knuckle’. Washed up shows her clearing away the influence of her ‘evening meal’ of experience.

The dream ab­scess may also represent a site of physical illness which may or may not be obvious while awake. See individuation. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Animus

The male within the female, shown as a man in a woman’s dreams. Physically a woman is predominantly fe­male, but also has a clitoris and produces some male hor­mones. Psychologically, we may only express part of our po­tential in everyday life. In a woman, the more physically dynamic, intellectual and socially challenging side of herself may be given less expression. Apart from this, some features, such as innovation and creative rational thought, may be held in latency. These secondary or latent characteristics are de­picted by the male in female dreams. In general we can say the man represents the woman’s mental and social power, her ability to act creatively in ‘the world’. It also holds in it an expression of her complex of feelings about men, gained as experience mostly from her relationship with—or lack of— father, but also from a synthesis of all her male contacts. So the whole realm of her expenence of the male can be repre­sented by the man in her dream, and is accessible through the image.

Good relationship with or marrying the man: shows the woman integrating her own ability to be independent and capable in outwardly active terms. This makes her more whole, balancing her ‘female’ qualities. It also shows the woman meeting her experience of her father in a healing way. This enables the woman to have a realistic relationship with an actual man. It also bnngs a sense of connectedness be­tween her conscious self and what she senses as the ‘commer­cial’ world. See father in this entry.

To be in conflict with the man, or unable to make real physical and pleasurable contact with him: suggests difficulty in meeting what may have been a painful or threatening expe­rience of father. This can lead to lack of ability to make clear judgments, and lack of decisiveness in areas outside feeling values. She is prone to acceptance of collective or long held social norms without question; family or national attitudes not applicable to present situations; and reasoning’ which actu­ally arises out of emotions connected to such family or social norms. Actual relations with men will be difficult, or entered into simply as a duty. Emotional or intimate merging with a man is threatening because it brings the woman close to the conflicts and pain connected with father. Sex may be possible but not a close feeling union. See man.

Christ Although people generally think of Christ as a histori­cal figure, in dreams Christ is not this at all. He is a powerful process in the human unconscious. In the west we give this process the name of Christ, but the process or archetype is universal and has various names in different cultures. Some­times represented in dreams as a fish or a big man, in general the Christ is an expression of the dreamer’s own potential— what they can become in their life. But it also depicts what might be called a sense of the forces of symbiosis or co­operative activity operative in human life and the cosmos. There are at least four aspects to Chrisi as depicted in dreams.

The Sunday school or Church Christ: depicts social norms, the generally accepted morals and social rules. This Christ’ comes about because the Church tends to represent tradi­tional values, and also the attempt to press people to live these values.

The dreamer may have a childlike relationship with this Christ or, if attempting to be self responsible, be in con­flict with it. Some people find this Christ has a castrating role in their life, and flee in horror. In fact this aspect of social indoctrination may lead to such a burden of guilt and sup­pression that it can create psychic cripples. Trying to do all the right’ things may lead us to the point where ‘we can’t say no to a glass of water without a pang of guilt*. Two of the great forces which push at the human soul or psyche are social pressure, such as the moral norm, and biological pressures, such as the sex drive, individuals may fight a lifelong battle with one or the other of these.

The social cnminal typifies battle with the first; the ascetic, battle with the second.

The ideal Christ: the psychological process which causes us not to take responsibility for our own highest ideals; our own yearnings for the good, our own most powerful urges arising against what we see as evils in the world. This influ­ences us to wait for a sign from Christ in our dream in order to gain authority, or to overcome the anxiety associated with the drive. We want God to say we should act in a cenain way because we are not willing to be self responsible. Example: I stood outside a castle. It was closed and guarded by soldiers in armour. Wondering how to get in I thought that if I dressed and acted as a soldier I would be allowed entrance. It worked and inside Christ met me and said he had important work for me to do’ (Sonia).

The closely guarded secret is Soma’s own impulse to do some son of socially creative work. She doesn’t want to acknowledge the impulse as her own; it is much easier if she can say ‘Christ told me to do this’. In this way she avoids direct encounter with opposition.

The unofficial Chnst. Example: A fierce battle was raging with bullets flying. I immediately fell down and played “dead”. It wasn’t that I was hurt in any way, but I didn’t want to be at any risk in the fight. As I lay there, I saw a tall well built man in soldier’s uniform walk to me. He gave no sign of any fear concerning the bullets, and quietly knelt beside me. I felt he was Christ, but was confused by him being a soldier. He placed a hand on my back and gradually worked his fin­gers under the shell of a large limpet type creature that I had never before known was parasitically attached to my back. I could feel him pull it away, but knew its tentacles still ran right into my chest. He then sat me up and told me how I could rid myself of the tentacles and so be healed’ (Peter Y).

Peter had a debilitating psychosomatic illness at the time of the dream, causing pain where the tentacles ran.

The shell is his defence against feeling his own hurts and inner conflicts.

The dream shows him contacting a strength which is not afraid of his internal battlefield of conflicts, and can show ways of healing real human problems.

The healing rests upon the dreamer’s conscious action, not Christ’s, suggesting the dreamer taking responsibility for his own situation. Peter real­ised he had been avoiding his own internal battlefield, but felt he had met a strength which would support his efforts to find healing. In fact he met his conflicts and grew beyond his ailments. Peter’s conflicts were between his love for his chil­dren and his sexuality. This Christ is our undammed life; the flood of loving sexuality; the strength to burst through social rules and regulations because love of life pushes us. It doesn’t give a hang about bullets, death, nght or wrong, because it has a sense of its own integral existence within life, and its own lightness and place in eternity.

The integral or cosmic Christ. Example: ‘I am a journalist reponing on the return of Christ. He is expected on a paddle steamer going upstream on a large river. I am very sceptical and watch disciples and followers gather on the rear deck.

The guru arrives, dressed in simple white robes. He has long, beautiful auburn hair and beard, and a gentle wise face. He begins to tap a simple rhythm on a tabla or Indian drum. It develops into complex intermingling of orchestral rhythms as everyone joins in. I now realise he is Christ, and feel over­whelmed with awe as I try to play my part in the music. I’m tapping with a pen and find myself fumbling.

A bottle or can opener comes to me from the direction of Christ. I try to beat a complementary rhythm, a small pan of a greater, universal music’ (Lester S).

Each of us has a sense of connectedness with the whole, with the cosmos. We may be little aware of this sense, our scepticism may deny it, as Lester’s was doing. But finding it can enrich the rest of our nature.

The sense bnngs with it a realisation of taking part in the unimaginably grand drama called life. It gives a feeling, no matter what the state of our body, crippled or healthy, that we have something that makes any faults in body or achievement insignificant. It doesn’t take all the difficulties out of life, but it is a good companion on the way. In dreams and religion Christ is also represented as the son of the Cosmos or God. This aspect of Christ is cosmic, from beyond the Earth. This is a process in the cosmos which the unconscious senses and presents under the image of Christ, or other figures in different religions.

It is possible that there is an innate process in human beings to do with love and symbiosis which humanity became aware of at a particu­lar stage in the development of consciousness. This becoming aware was expressed in what we know as the histoncal Jesus. See religion and dreams; the self within this entry. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Back

Strength, but particularly moral fibre.

A psychiatrist once told me that many men in a tramp s home were diag­nosed CWB; it meant ‘congenitally without backbone’. Exam­ple. ‘I was looking across a hedge at a bull. I seemed to be just looking at its back’ (Andy). Andy was a teenager, uncertain of himself. In this dream he was looking at his strength.

Someone on one’s back: feeling dominated by someone else; carrying one’s parents’ wants and decisions instead of one’s own. Idioms: backbreaking; back to the wall, behind one’s back; get off my back; put somebody’s back up; rod for one’s back, pat on the back; stab in the back; turn one’s back on; scratch my back. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Birds

Example: ‘I was standing outside the house of my teens, with my mother. She had a very young bird on a long ribbon and the bird was flying very high in the sky’ (Pauline).

The life cycle of a bird has so many similarities with impor­tant human stages of maturity we frequently use it to represent oneself, as in the example. Pauline uses the bird to depict her own urge to be independent of her mother’s influence, opin­ions, likes, dislikes and decisions. Later in the dream her mother hands Pauline the ribbon to hold, suggesting an offer of independence. As soon as she lets go of the ribbon, a huge black bird attacks the ribboned one.

The ribbons are a refer­ence to Pauline’s own girlhood. When she lets go of her girl­hood, moving towards independent womanhood, she feels threatened by the internalised negative side of her mother, such as her possessiveness—the black bird. Internalised means all the standards, self controls she learned from her life with her mother, which she now carries within her even if absent from her mother.

General: Imagination; intuition, the mind; thoughts, our spiritual longings; expanded awareness—in this form, per­haps a large bird which can fly high. Because wider—or spiri­tual—awareness means looking beyond the usual boundaries of what we see, this may be painful. Hatching from the egg; our birth and infancy.

The nest: home; family environment; security, even the womb. Leaving the nest: gaining indepen­dence. Making a nest: home building; parental urges. Flying: rising above something; independence; freedom; self expres­sion.

Freud said the bird represents the male phallus, and flying means the sexual act. Many languages use the word bird’ to mean woman. In Italy it alludes to penis.

The bird is also used to denote the sense of death and survival. Bluebird: especially represents the spint or soul after death. Baby bird: our own childhood, as in the following example.

The old lady is once more reference to the mother, to whom the bird is first con­nected before moving on to the difficulty of independence. Example: An old lady made room for me to sit at the end of one of the three seats of a bus. As we drove away a very large chicken-size baby bird flew in. It had short stubby wings and yellow down, but flew expenly. I believe it first landed on the lady and chirped squeakily. But in its squeaks it actually spoke, saying it had lost its mother. It sounded as if it were crying (Andrew). Idioms: charm the birds from the trees; a bird told me; bird has flown; bird in the hand, bird of ill omen; free as a bird, odd bird. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Black Person

Depends which skin colour one has.

If white: one’s natural drives, feelings about coloured people; or if per­son is known, what you feel about them.

If black or brown: one’s own cultural feelings; same as any person’ dream.

Example: \ was in a cubicle or small toilet with a very black coloured woman. She told me there was something wrong with her vagina. She was undressed. I rubbed her va­gina and we both felt enormous passion. I then awoke but couldn’t at first remember the dream. I have refrained from sexual intercourse for some weeks, as I always feel shattered/ tired afterwards. Anyway I woke very wet, yet couldn’t re­member any orgasm. I could remember some question of sex as I awoke. Then I remembered the dream and continued it in fantasy. I experienced powerful urges to find a woman to have a non-committed sexual relationship with. But in the end I wanted to share my feelings with my wife, but she seemed deep asleep and unresponsive. When I slept again I dreamt I was in London, had got off one bus, but was not at any desti­nation. I was standing about not making a move to find my direction. Then I began to look’ (Alfred C).

To understand this dream in some depth it is helpful to think of a sexual drive as a flow, like a river. As such it can be blocked, in which case it will seek an alternative route. Sexual energy or flow is not simply a mechanical thing, ihough; it is also deeply feeling in its connection with the most profound sides of hu­man life such as parenthood and the canng and providing for young. In the history of white people a great deal of sexual frustration has arisen out of the ideas of sin and guilt in their religion.

A view arose for the white race that the black races had an easier and less frustrating relationship with the natural —which includes not only sexuality but the body as a whole, and nature also. So when Alfred dreams of the black woman, he is meeting what is natural and flowing in himself, but which he has blocked by his will because he felt shattered after sex.

The pan about the bus shows him trying to find a direction in which his sexual feelings could move satisfyingly in connection with other people.

Unfonunately, as Jung points out in Man and His Symbols, people in modern society, whether black, yellow, brown or white, have lost their sense of nature and the cosmos as being anything other than processes without consciousness or living feeling. Jung says. No river contains a spirit, no tree is the life principle of a man. no snake the embodiment of wisdom. No voice now speaks to man from stones, plants, and animals, nor does he speak to them believing they can hear.’ The im­portance of such dreams as Arthur’s is that it shows the pas­sionate relationship between our personality and the pnmitive and natural.

A black person, born and bred in a modern setting, would most likely dream of a black bushman to depict their own natural drives. See identity and dreams; Africa; sex in dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Blood

One’s energy and sense of existence. Being hurt—such as hurtful remarks, being told we are not loved—can sap our motive to live and may be depicted as blood, injury, often from past trauma, which is causing us to lose energy or moti­vation, our fundamental biological, evolutionary life, and thus a link with all life, so seen as a sacrament. This is portrayed not as injury but nourishment, wine or bloody meat. In sexual dreams: may refer to loss of virginity, menstruation or fertility, or hurt to sexual drive. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Castrate

Example: ‘On looking at my son I see his penis has been completely cut off. I feel terribly upset, but notice that on each side of the remaining hole, special pieces of tissue have been implanted. These are budding, just like a plant, and I know, or am told, that a whole penis will grow’ (Edmond U). Edmond did in fact frequently ‘cut off’ his sexuality by absti­nence.

The dream graphically shows that sexual drives are like a living process.

Trauma and/or fear regarding sexual drive, possibly lead­ing to ‘cutting off’ full sexual flow; fear of the responsibility which develops with sexual maturity; the difficulty in facing the pains and adjustments which come with rejection by the opposite sex, competition for work and wealth, standing with­out parental support, making decisions, discriminating in the world of ideas and exercise of will.

Doing it to oneself: denying one’s own sexual drive, intro­verted anger at sexual drive; the conflict of choice between feminine and masculine. Done to one: trauma in sexual na­ture. Doing it to another: one’s own sexual pains or trauma may lead to the unconscious killing out of sexuality in one’s children or others. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Catacomb, Crypt

Example: T was in some kind of cave or crypt. My father told me and my family of his coming death. He was calm and caring but my mother, sister and myself were grief stricken and for some reason went to buy him gifts’ (Clare M). Usually refers to feelings connected with death, as in the example. It suggests, even in this, a womblike condi­tion, and birth or a child may also figure in the same dream. Also a place of power or hidden forces, where a connection may be made with our unconscious, our inner link with other people and the energies of our body. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Collective Unconscious

Jung describes this as the inherited potentialities of human imagination.

It is the all controlling deposit of ancestral experiences from untold millions of years, the echo of prehistoric world events to which each century adds an infinitesimal small amount of variation and differenti­ation. These primordial images are the most ancient, univer­sal, and deep thoughts of mankind.’

Jung tried to explain his observation of a strata of being in which individual minds have their collective origin in a ge­netic way. This seems unlikely, and Rupert Sheldrake sees it as a mental phenomena. Dr Maurice Bucke called it cosmic consciousness. J.B. Priestley saw it as ‘the flame of life’ which synthesised the experience of all living things and held within itself the essentials of all lives.

If we think of it as a vast collective memory of all that has existed, then we can say the life of Edgar Cayce exhibited a working relationship with it.

Such a collective level of mind would explain many things, such as telepathy, out of body experiences, life after death, which have always been puzzling because they are difficult to explain using presently known principles. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Contraceptive

Example: ‘I was in my mother s bedroom with my teenage boyfriend. We were laying in my parents’ double bed and he was kissing my breasts. I realised we were near to making love and told him I was not on the pill. Seeing him taken aback, I told him my father has contraceptives in a nearby drawer.

The dream fades as he is trying to put one on’ (Julia). Julia, a teenager, is obviously approaching her readi­ness for lovemaking. She has accepted the sexual standards of her parents—their bed.

The contraceptive represents anxiety about pregnancy; sexual responsibility; sexual standards, sex­ually transmitted diseases. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Creativity And Problem Solving In Dreams

Few dreams are, by themselves, problem solving or creative.

The few excep­tions are usually very clear. Example: ‘My mother-in-law died of cancer. I had watched the whole progression of her illness, and was very upset by her death. Shortly after she died the relatives gathered and began to sort through her belongings to share them out. That was the climax of my upset and distress, and I didn’t want any part of this sorting and taking her things. That night I dreamt I was in a room with all the relatives. They were sorting her things, and I felt my waking distress. Then my mother-in-law came into the room. She was very real and seemed happy. She said for me not to be upset as she didn’t at all mind her relatives taking her things. When I woke from the dream all the anxiety and upset had disap­peared. It never returned (told to author dunng a talk given to the Housewives Register in Ilfracombe).

Although in any collection of dreams such clearcut prob­lem solving is fairly rare, nevertheless the basic function in dreams appears to be problem solving.

The proof of this lies in research done in dream withdrawal. As explained in the entry science, sleep and dreams, subjects are woken up as they begin to dream, therefore denying them dreams. This quickly leads to disorientation and breakdown of normal functioning, showing that a lot of problem solving occurs in dreams, even though it may not be as obvious as in the exam­ple. This feature of dreaming can be enhanced to a marked degree by processing dreams and arriving at insights into the information they contain. This enables old problems to be cleared up and new information and attitudes to be brought into use more quickly. Through such active work one be­comes aware of the self, which Carl Jung describes as a cen­tre, but which we might think of as a synthesis of all our experience and being. Gaining insight and allowing the self entrance into our waking affairs, as M L. Von Franz says in Man and His Symbols, gradually produces a wider and more mature personality’ which emerges, and by degrees becomes effective and even visible to others’.

The function of dreams may well be described as an effort on the part of our life process to support, augment and help mature waking consciousness.

A study of dreams suggests that the creative forces which are behind the growth of our body are also inextricably connected with psychological develop­ment. In fact, when the process of physical growth stops, the psychological growth continues.

If this is thwarted in any way, it leads to frustration, physical tension and psychosomatic and eventually physical illness.

The integration of experience.

which dreams are always attempting, if successful cannot help but lead to personal growth. But it is often frozen by the individual avoiding the growing pains’, or the discomfon of breaking through old concepts and beliefs.

Where there is any attempt on the pan of our conscious personality to co-operate with this, the creative aspect of dreaming emerges. In fact anything we are deeply involved in, challenged by or attempting, we will dream about in a creative way. Not only have communities like the American Indians used dreams in this manner—to find better hunting, solve community problems, find a sense of personal life direction— but scientists, writers, designers and thousands of lay people have found very real information in dreams After all, through dreams we have personal use of the greatest computer ever produced in the history of the world—the human brain.

1- In Genesis 41, the story of Pharaoh’s dream is told—the seven fat cows and the seven thin cows. This dream was creative in that, with Joseph’s interpretation, it resolved a national problem where famine followed years of plenty. It may very well be an example of gathered information on the history of Egypt being in the mind of Pharaoh, and the dream putting it together in a problem solving way. See dream process as computer.

2- William Blake dreamt his dead brother showed him a new way of engraving copper. Blake used the method success­fully.

3- Otto Leowi dreamt of how to prove that nervous impulses were chemical rather than electncal. This led to his Nobel prize.

4- Friedrich Kekule tned for years to define the structure of benzene. He dreamt of a snake with its tail in its mouth, and woke to realise this explained the molecular forma­tion of the benzene ring. He was so impressed he urged colleagues, ‘Gentlemen, leam to dream.’

5- Hilprecht had an amazing dream of the connection be­tween two pieces of agate which enabled him to translate an ancient Babylonian inscription.

6- Elias Howe faced the problem of how to produce an effec­tive sewing machine.

The major difficulty was the needle. He dreamt of natives shaking spears with holes in their points. This led to the invention of the Singer sewing ma­chine.

7- Robert Louis Stevenson claims to have dreamt the plot of many of his stories.

8- Albert Einstein said that during adolescence he dreamt he was riding a sledge. It went faster and faster until it reached the speed of light.

The stars began to change into amazing patterns and colours, dazzling and beautiful. His meditation on that dream throughout the years led to the theory of relativity.

To approach our dreams in order to discover their creativity, first decide what problematic or creative aspect of your life needs ‘dream power’. Define what you have already leamt or know about the problem. Write it down, and from this clarify what it is you want more insight into.

If this breaks down into several issues, choose one at a time. Think about the issue and pursue it as much as you can while awake. Read about it, ask people’s opinions, gather information. This is all data for the dream process.

If the question still needs further insight, be­fore going to sleep imagine you are putting the question to your internal store of wisdom, computer, power centre, or whatever image feels right.

For some people an old being who is neither exclusively man nor woman is a working image.

In the morning note down whatever dream you remember. It does not matter if the dream does not appear to deal with the question; Elias Howe’s native spears were an outlandish image, but nevertheless contained the information he needed. Investigate the dream using the techniques given in the entry dream processing. Some problems take time to define, so use the process until there is a resolution.

If it is a major problem, it may take a year or so; after all, some resolutions need re­structuring of the personality, because the problem cannot disappear while we still have the same attitudes and fears. See secret of the universe dreams; dream processing. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Danger

Most often anxiety. We may fear the danger of al­lowing our sexual urges—the danger of falling in love with its possible pain—the danger of failing if we take a nsk. These may be depicted as impending danger in a dream. In such cases the real danger is of taking our anxieties as reality, instead of seeing them for what they are, a reaction to a situa­tion.

A relative, loved one in danger: the temptation is to believe the dream is presaging a real event. Our concern for children and loved ones, but more often our fears regarding them, create most of such dreams.

A woman told me a dream in which her daughter was strangled while at university. In processing her dream the woman wept strongly as she met feelings of fear about her daughter leaving home and living independently at university. See attack; predictive dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dead Husband Or Wife

Many dreams of dead people come from women who have lost their husband.

It is common to have disturbing dreams for some period afterwards; or not be able to dream about the husband (or wife) at all; or to see the partner in the distance but not get near. In accepting the death, meeting any feelings of loss, grief, anger and continu­ing love, the dream may become as below.

The example both shows the resolution of the loss, but also the paradox felt at realising the meeting was an inner reality. Example: ‘A couple of months ago as I was waking I felt my husband’s arm across me and most realistically experienced my hand wrapping around his arm and turning towards him (which I had done so often in his lifetime) and saying “1 thought you had died. Thank God you have not.” Then I awoke alone and terribly shaken’ (Mrs I).

A critic might say this is only a dream in which a lonely woman is replaying memories of her dead husband’s presence for her own comfort—thus her disap­pointment on being disillusioned. Whatever our opinion, the woman has within her such memories to replay. These are reality.

The inner reality is of what experience was left within her from the relationship. Her challenge is whether she can meet this treasure with its share of pain, and draw out of it the essence which enriches her own being. That is the spiritual life of her husband.

The aliveness’ of her husband in that sense is also social, because many other people share memo­ries of him. What arises in their own lives from such memo­ries is the observable influence of the now dead person.

But the dead also touch us more mysteriously, as in the next example. Example: In a recent news programme on tele­vision, a man who survived a Japanese prisoner of war camp in Singapore had been given a photograph of children by a dying soldier he did not know.

The man had asked him to tell his family of his death, but did not give his name.

The photo­graph was kept for 40 odd years, the man still wanting to complete his promise but not knowing how. One night he dreamt he was told the man’s name. Enquiries soon found the family of the man, who had an identical photograph. See husband under family. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Death

Example: My son comes in and I see he is unwashed and seems preoccupied and as if he has not cared for himself for some days. I ask him what is wrong. He tells me his mother is dead. I then seem to know she has been dead for days, and my two sons have not told anyone. In fact my other son has not even accepted the fact’ (Anthony). Anthony is a divorcee. Processing the dream he realised the two sons are ways he is relating to the death of his marriage to the chil­dren’s mother.

A dead body, death of someone we know: very often, as in the example, the death of some aspect of our outer or inner life. Our drive to achieve something might die, and be shown as a death in our dreams. Lost opportunities or unexpressed potentials in ourselves are frequently shown as dead bodies. All of us unconsciously leam attitudes or survival skills from parents and others. Often these are unrecognised and may be shown as dead.

Example: ‘During my teens I was engaged to be married, when I found a more attractive panner and was in consider­able conflict. Consistently I dreamt I was at my fiance’s fu­neral until it dawned on me the dream was telling me I wanted to be free of him. When I gave him up the dreams ceased1 (Mrs D).

If the death is of someone we know: fre­quently, as in the example, desire to be free of the person, or unexpressed aggression; perhaps one’s love for that person has ‘died’. We often ‘kill’ our partners in dreams as we move towards independence. Or we may want someone ‘out of the way so we do not have to compete for attention and love.

Death of oneself: exploration of feelings about death; re­treat from the challenge of life; split between mind and body.

The experience of leaving the body is frequently an expression of this schism between the ego and life processes. Also death of old patterns of living—one’s ‘old self.

The walking dead, rigor mortis: aspects of the dreamer which are denied, per­haps through fear. Dancing with, meeting death or dark fig­ure: facing up to death.

Example: ‘I dream I have a weak heart which will be fatal.

It is the practice of doctors in such cases to administer a tablet causing one painlessly to go to sleep—die. I am completely calm and accepting of my fate. I suddenly realise I must leave notes for my parents and children. I must let them know how much I love them, must do this quickly before my time runs out’ (Mrs M). This is a frequent type of ‘death* dream.

It is a way of reminding ourselves to do now what we want to, espe­cially regarding love. Although the unconscious has a very real sense of its eternal nature and continuance after physical death, the ego seldom shares this. We have an unconscious realisation that collective humanity carries the living experi­ence from the life of the dead.

The farmer roday uncon­sciously uses the collective experience of humanity in farming. What innovation he does today his children or others will learn and carry into the future. Idioms: dead and buried, dead from the neck up/down; dead to the world, play dead. See death and rebirth under archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Analysis

Sigmund Freud was the founder of modern therapeutic analysis of dreams. Freud encouraged clients to relax on a couch and allow free associations to arise in con­nection with aspects of their dream. In this way he helped the person move from the surface images (manifest content) of the dream to the underlying emotions, fantasies and wishes (latent content), often connected with early childhood. Be­cause dreams use condensation—a mass of different ideas or experiences all represented by one dream image or event— Freud stated that the manifest content was meagre’ compared with the ‘richness and variety’ of latent content.

If one suc­ceeds in touching the feelings and memories usually con­nected with a dream image, this becomes apparent because of the depth of insight and experience which arises. Although ideally the Freudian analyst helps the client discover their own experience of their dream, it can occur that the analyst puts to the client readymade views of the dream. Out of this has occurred the idea of someone else ‘analysing or telling us about our dream.

Carl Jung used a different approach. He applied amplifica­tion (see entry), helped the client explore their associations, used active imagination (see entry) and stuck to the structure of the dream. Because amplification also put to the client the information and experience of the therapist, again the dreamwork can be largely verbal and intellectual, rather than experiential.

In the approach of Fritz Perls (gestalt therapy) and Moreno (psychodrama), dream analysis is almost entirely experiential.

The person exploring the dream acts out or verbalises each role or aspect of the dream.

If one dreamt of a house, in gestalt one might stan by saying I am a house’ and then go on to describe oneself just as one is as the particular house in the dream.

It is important, even if the house were one existing externally, not to attempt a description of the external house, but to stay with the house as it was in the dream. This is like amplification, except the client gives all the information. This can be a very dramatic and emotional experience because we begin consciously to touch the immense realms of experience usually hidden behind the image. When successful this leads to personal insights into behaviour and creativity. See dream processing; amplification; gestalt dream work.

dream as a meeting place Any two people, or group of people who share their dreams, particularly if they explore the associated feelings and thoughts connected with the dream images, achieve social intimacy quickly. Whether it is a family sharing their dreams, or two fnends, an environment can be created in which the most profound feelings, painful and wonderful, can be allowed. Such exposure of the usually pri­vate areas of one s feelings and fears often presents new infor­mation to the dreamer, and also allows ventilation of what may never have been consciously expressed before. In doing so a healing release is reached, but also greater self under­standing and the opportunity to think over or reconsider what is discovered.

Herbert Reed, editor of the dream magazine Sundance, and resident in Virginia Beach, Va., initiated group dreaming ex­periments. It started because Reed noticed that in the dream groups he was running, when one of the group aired a prob­lem, other members would subsequently dream about that person’s problem. He went on to suggest the group should attempt this purposely and the resulting dreams shared to see if they helped the person with the problem.

The reported dreams often formed a more detailed view of the person’s situation. In one instance the group experienced many dream images of water. It aided the woman who was seeking help to admit she had a phobia of water and to begin thinking about learning to swim. In another experiment, a woman presented the problem of indecision about what college to transfer to and what to study. Her group subsequently said they were confused because they had not dreamt about school. Several had dreams about illicit sex. though, which led the woman to admit she was having an affair with a married man. She went on to realise that it was the affair which was underlying her indecision. She chose to end the affair and further her career.

Whatever may be underlying the results of Reed’s expen- ments, it is noticeably helpful to use the basic principles he is working with. They can be used by two people equally as well as a group—by a parent and child, wife and husband, busi­nessman and employee. One sets out to dream about each other through mutual agreement. Like any undertaking, the involvement, and therefore the results, are much more pro­nounced if there is an issue of reasonable importance behind the experiment. It helps if one imagines that during sleep you are going to meet each other to consider what is happening between you. Then sleep, and on waking take time to recall any dream. Note it down, even if it seems far removed from what you expected. Then explore its content using the tech­niques in dream processing.

Example: My wife and I decided to attempt to meet in our dreams. I dreamt I was in a room similar to the back bedroom of my previous marnage. My present wife was with me. She asked me to help her move the wardrobe. It reminded me of, but did not look like, the one which had been in that bed­room. I stood with my back to it, and reached my hands up to press on the top, inside. In this way I carried it to another wall. As I put it down the wood broke. I felt it ought to be thrown away’ (Thomas B). Thomas explored the dream and found he connected feelings about his first marriage with the wardrobe and bedroom. In fact the shabby wardrobe was Tom’s feelings of shabbiness at having divorced his first wife. In his first marriage, represented by the bedroom, he always felt he was married for life. In divorcing, he had done some­thing he didn’t like and was carrying it about with him. He says ‘1 am carrying this feeling of shabbiness and second best into my present relationship, and I need to get rid of it.’

dream as a spiritual guide Dreams have always been con­nected with the spiritual side of human experience, even though today many spiritual leaders disagree with consider­ation of dreams. Because dreams put the dreamer in touch with the source of their own internal wisdom and certainty, some conflict has existed between authoritative priesthood and public dreaming.

A lay person finding their own ap­proach to God in a dream might question the authority of the priests. No doubt people frequently made up dreams about God in order to be listened to. Nevertheless, despite opposi­tion, Matthew still dreamt of an angel appearing to him, Jo­seph was still warned by God to move Jesus; Peter still dreamt his dream of the unclean animals.

The modern scientific approach has placed large question marks against the concept of the human spirit. Study of the brain’s functions and biochemical activities have led to a sense of human personality being wholly a series of biological and biochemical events.

The results of this in the relationship between doctor and patient, psychiatrist and client, some­times results in the communication of human personality be­ing of little consequence. It may not be put into words, but the intimation is that if one is depressed it is a biochemical prob­lem or a brain malfunction.

If one is withdrawn or autistic, it is not that there is a vital centre of personality which has for some reason chosen to avoid contact, but that a biochemical or physiological problem is the cause—it’s nothing personal, take this pill (to change the biochemistry, because you are not really a person). Of course we have to accept that human personality must sometimes face the tragedy of biochemical malfunction, but we also need to accept that biochemical and physiological process can be changed by human will and courage.

In attempting to find what the human spirit is by looking at dreams, creativity stands out.

The spiritual nature may not be what we have traditionally considered it to be.

An overview of dreams and how dreamers relate to them suggests one amaz­ing fact. Let us call it the ‘seashell effect’. When we hear sounds in a shell that we hold to our ear, the noises heard seem exterior to oneself, yet they are most likely amplification of sounds created in our own ear, perhaps by the passage of blood. Imagine an electronic arcade machine which the player could sit in and, when running, the player could be engulfed in images, sounds, smell and sensation. At first there is shim­mering darkness, then a sound, and lights move. Is it a face seen, or a creature. Like Rorschach’s ink blots, the person creates figures and scenes out of the shapeless light and sound.

A devil appears which terrifies the player. People, de­mons, animals, God and angels appear and fade. Scenes are clearcut or a maelstrom of movement and ill-defined activity. Events arise showing every and any aspect of human experi­ence. Nothing is impossible.

If, on stepping out, we told the player that what occurred was all their own creation due to unconscious feelings, fears, habits, thoughts and physiological processes occurring within them, like the seashell effect, they might say ‘Good God, is that all it was, and I thought it was real. What a waste of time.’

Whether we can accept it or not, as a species we have created out of our own longings, fears, pain and perhaps vi­sion, God, with many different names—politics, money, dev­ils, nationalism, angels, an, and so on and on. All of it has flowed out of us. Perhaps we even deny we are the authors of the Bible, wars, social environments. Responsibility is diffi­cult.

It is easier to believe the source is outside oneself. And if we do take responsibility for our amazing creativity, we may feel ‘is that all it is—me?’ Yet out of such things, such fears, such drives, such unconscious patterns as we shape our dreams with, we shape our life and fonune, we shape our children, we shape the world and our future.

The shadow of fear we create in our dream, the situation of aloneness and anger, becomes a pattern of feelings, real in its world of mind. We create a monster, a Djinn, a devil, which then haunts and influences us. Or with feelings of hope, of purposiveness and love, create other forces in us and the world. But we are the creator. We are in no way separate from the forces which create our existence. We are those creative forces. In the deep­est sense, not just as an ego, we create ourselves, and we go on creating ourselves. We are the God humanity has looked so long for.

The second aspect of the human spirit demonstrated by dreams is consciousness.

The unconscious mind, if its func­tion is not clogged with a backlog of undealt with painful childhood experience and nonfunctional premises, has a pro­pensity to form gestalts. It takes pieces of experience and fits them together to form a whole. This is illustrated by how we form gestalts when viewing newsprint photographs, which are made up of many small dots. Our mind fits them together and sees them as a whole, giving meaning where there are only dots. When the human mind is working well, when the indi­vidual can face a wide range of emotions, from fear and pain to ecstasy, this process of forming gestalts can operate very creatively. This is because it needs conscious involvement, and if the personality is frightened of deep feeling, the uniting of deeply infantile and often disturbing cxpcrience is cut out. Yet these areas are very rich mines of information, containing our most fundamental learning.

If the process is working well, then one’s expenence is gradually transformed into insights which transcend and thereby transform one s personal life.

For instance, we have witnessed our own binh in some manner, we also see many others appeanng as babies. We see people ageing, dying. We see millions of events in our life and in others.

The uncon­scious, deeply versed in imagery, ritual and body language, out of which it creates its dreams, picks up information from music, architecture, traditional rituals, people walking in the street, the unspoken world of parental influence.

The sources are massive, unbelievable. And out of it all our mind creates meaning. Like a process of placing face over face over face until a composite face is formed, a synthesis of all the faces; so the unconscious scans all this information and creates a world view, a concept of life and death.

The archetypes Jung talks of are perhaps the resulting synthesis of our own expenence, reaching points others have met also.

If so, then Chnst might be our impression of humanity as a whole.

If we dare to touch such a synthesis of experience it may be seanng, breathtaking.

It breaks the boundaries of our present personality and con­cepts because it transcends. It shatters us to let the new vision emerge. It reaches, it soars, like an eagle flying above the single events of life. Perhaps because of this the great hawk of ancient Egypt represented the human spirit.

Lastly, humans have always been faced by the impossible.

To a baby, walking and not wetting its pants is impossible, but with many a fall and accident it does the impossible.

It is a god in its achievement.

To talk, to fly heavier-than-air planes, to walk on the Moon, were all impossible. Humans challenge the impossible every day. Over and over they fall, back into defeat. Many lie there broken. Yet with the next moment along come youngsters with no more sense than grasshoppers, and because they don’t know what the differ­ence is between right and left, do the impossible. Out of the infinite potential, the great unknown, they draw something new. With hope, with folly, with a wisdom they gain from who knows where, they demand more. And it’s a common everyday son of miracle. Mothers do it constantly for their children—transcending themselves. Lovers go through hell and heaven for each other and flower beyond who they were. You and I grow old on it as our daily bread, yet fail to see how holy it is. And if we turn away from it, it is because it offers no certainties, gives no authority, claims no reward.

It is the spir­itual life of people on the street. And our dreams remember, even if we fail.

For this is the body and blood of the human spirit.

dream as a therapist and healer There is a long tradition of using dreams as a base for both physical and psychological healing. One of the earliest recorded incidents of such healing is when Pharaoh’s ‘spirit was troubled, and he sent for all the magicians of Egypt and all its wise men; and Pharaoh told them his dream, but there was none who could interpret it’. Then Joseph revealed the meaning of the dream and so the healing of Pharaoh’s troubled mind took place (Genesis 41).

The Greek Temples of Asclepius were devoted to using dreams as a base for healing of body and mind (see dreams and ancient Greece).

The Iroquois Amerindians used a social form of dream therapy also (see Iroquoian dream cult).

The dream process was used much more widely throughout his­tory in such practices as Pentecostal Christianity, shaktipat yoga in India, and Anton Mesmer’s groups (see sleep move­ments).

Sigmund Freud pioneered the modern approach to the use of dreams in therapy, but many different approaches have developed since his work. Examples of the therapeutic action of gaining insight into dreams are to be found in the entnes on abreaction, recurring dreams, reptiles.

The entry on dream processing gives information about using a dream to gain insight and healing. See also dream as meeting place.

A feature which people who use their dreams as a thera­peutic tool mention again and again is how dreams empower them. Many of us have an unconscious feeling that any impor­tant healing work regarding our body and mind can only be undertaken and directed by an expert, the expert might be a doctor, a psychiatrist, psychotherapist, or osteopath. Witness­ing the result of their own dream process, even if helped by an expert, people feel in touch with a wonderful internal process which is working actively for their own good. One woman, who had worked on her dream with the help of a fnend (non expert), said It gave me great confidence in my own internal process. I realised there was something powerful in myself working for my own good. It was a feeling of cooperating with life.’ One is frequently amazed by one’s own resources of wisdom, penetrating insight and sense of connection with life, as met in dreamwork. This is how dreams play a pan in helping one towards wholeness and balance.

The growing awareness of one’s central view of things, which is so wide, piercing and often humorous, brings developing self respect as the saga of one’s dreams unfolds.

There may be no hint of this, however, if a person simply records their dreams without attempting to find a deeply felt contact with their contents.

It is in the searching for associ­ated feelings and ideas that the work of integrating the many strands of one’s life begins. Gradually one weaves, through a co-operative action with the dream process, a greater unifica­tion of the dark and the light, the painful and transcendent in one’s nature.

The result is an extraordinary process of educa­tion. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dreaming The Future

Just before his title fight in 1947, Sugar Ray Robinson dreamt he was in the ring with Doyle. ‘I hit him a few good punches and he was on his back, his blank eyes staring up at me.’ Doyle never moved and the crowd were shouting ‘He’s dead! He’s dead!’ He was so upset by the dream Robinson asked Adkins, his trainer and promoter, to call off the fight. Adkins told him ‘Dreams don’t come true.

If they did I’d be a millionaire.* In the eighth round Doyle went down from a left hook to the jaw. He never got up, and died the next day.

The problem is that many such dreams felt to be predictive never come true. Often dreamers want to believe they have precognitive dreams, perhaps to feel they will not be surprised by, and thereby anxious about, the future. When the baby son of Charles Lindbergh was kidnapped, and before it was known he was murdered, 1,300 people sent ‘precognitive’ dreams concerning his fate in response to newspaper head­lines. Only seven of these dreams included the three vital factors—that he was dead, naked and in a ditch.

Out of 8,000 dreams in his Registry for Prophetic Dreams,

Robert Nelson, who was sent dreams pnor to what was pre­dicted, has found only 48 which bear detailed and recognis­able connection with later events. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dreaming Together

Example:41 dreamt my sister was attacking me with a pair of scissors. She backed me against a wall and stabbed me. During the day after the dream my sister phoned me at work and said she’d had an awful dream in which she stabbed me with scissors’ (D).

The Poseidia Institute of Vir­ginia Beach, Va., have run a number of group ‘mutual dream­ing’ experiments. Although the Institute suggests very positive results, a critical survey of the dreams and reports reveals a lack of hard evidence. Like other areas of ESP dreaming, it can seldom ever be willed. But the dreams did show themes related to problems regarding intimate meeting. Also, some of the dreams were directly about the goal of dream meeting, as in the following example.

Example: ‘I find the group of people I am looking for. There were maybe six or more people. They were asleep on mattresses except for two or three. These were awake and waiting for me, and wearing small pointed hats such as Ti­betan Lamas wear. In the dream I realised this meant they had achieved sufficient inner growth to remain awake in sleep. We started to communicate and were going to wake the others’ (Tom C). See dream as a meeting place.

the dream as extended perception Even everyday mental func­tions such as thought and memory occur largely uncon­sciously. During sleep, perhaps because we surrender our vo­lition, what is left of self awareness enters the realm where the nine-tenths of the iceberg of our mind is active. In this realm faculties can function which on waking seem unobtainable.

For example:

1- Extending awareness to a point distant from the body, to witness events confirmed by other people. This is often called out of body experience (OBE), but some of these experiences suggest the nature of consciousness and time may not be dualistic (having to be either here or there). See out of body experience.

2-Being aware of the death or danger of a member of family. Kinship and love seem to be major factors in the way the unconscious functions. See dead people dreams.

3-Seeing into the workings of the body and diagnosing an illness before it becomes apparent to waking observation. Dr Vasali Kasatkin and Professor Medard Boss have specialised in the study of such dreams. In a recent dream told to me, a man looked back into a bedroom and saw a piece of the wall fall away. Waves of water gushed from a main pipe.

The dreamer struggled to hold back the piece of broken pipe. Within two weeks his colon burst and he had to have a major operation. See meditation.

4-Access to a computer-like ability to son through a massive store of information and experience to solve problems. These dreams are often confused with precognitive ability. Prediction does occur from these dreams, but it arises, as with weather prediction, from a massive gathering of in­formation, most of which we have forgotten consciously. Monon Schatzman, in a New Scientist anicle, showed how subjects can produce answers to complex mathematical problems in their dreams. See dream process as com­puter; creativity and problem solving in dreams.

5-Tapping a collective mind which stores all experience, and is sensed as godlike or holy. See dream as spiritual guide.

It seems likely that before the development of speech the human animal communicated largely through body lan­guage. Some dreams suggest we still have this ability to read a person’s health, sexual situation, intentions and even their past, through body shape, posture and tiny movements. See postures, movement and body language.

See Cayce, Edgar; collective unconscious; wife under family. See also hallucinations. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Ejaculation, Emission

Example: I was in a cubicle or small toilet with a very black coloured woman. She told me there was something wrong with her vagina. She was undressed. I rubbed her vagina and we both felt enormous passion. I then woke but couldn’t at first remember the dream. I have re­frained from sexual intercourse for some weeks, as I always feel shattered/tired afterwards. Anyway I awoke very wet, yet couldn’t remember any ejaculation. Then I remembered the dream and continued it in fantasy. I experienced powerful urges to find a woman to have a non-committed sexual rela­tionship with. But in the end I wanted to share my feelings with my wife, but she seemed deep asleep’ (Alan P).

The example shows how our sexual needs attempt to satisfy them­selves even though we may make a conscious attempt to deny them.

The ejaculation, male or female, shows the sexual na­ture of one’s dream, even if the symbols seem to have no obvious connection.

The attitudes in one’s dream also show something of our relationship to sex. This may be mechanical, fearful, loving, etc. Alan sees sex as a problem to be solved, and has difficulties around commitment. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Embryo

An extremely vulnerable aspect of us; our own prenatal experience; or our feelings connected with our pre­natal life—for instance we may have been told our mother tned to abort us. Even if this is not so, the idea acts as a focus for our feelings of rejection and infantile pain.

The embryo or foetus would therefore symbolise such feelings. See baby. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences