schools

Dream Interpretation Schools | Dream Meanings


Schools in our dreams represent places of learning where we receive the lessons we need to grow intellectually and psychologically. Entenng an elementary school represents learning something basic such as balancing your checkbook or getting enough to eat.

A high school may represent that which prepares you for worR in the world or lessons about your spiritual nature. Enrolling in a university or college might represent being ready to leam what it takes to graduate in life. It may represent concerns about your professional career or ways of achieving recognition and status in society.

Ariadne's Book of Dream | Ariadne Green


Schools | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Schools

Cows

(see Animals)

Red cows appearing in a dream are a positive, hopeful omen of peace and plenty. In Persia, these represented the spirit of dawn, which is filled with renewed vitality and courage.

In Greece, an all-white cow was ail alternative symbol for the moon.

A natural source of nourishment (see Meat).

Among the Celts and people of Scandinavian heritages, an emblem of continued provision.

A sacred animal in India, representative of life itself.

The milk from cows is used to nourish kings and priests, so this dream may represent self-nourishment.

Among ancient Egyptians, Indians, and Scandinavians, the cow was an emblem of the Great iMother, and some psychological schools still ascribe this image as possibly being linked to your own mother (see Women).... The Language of Dreams

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The Language of Dreams

Mirror

There are two schools of thought about your dreams of a mirror. One is that if you see yourself in a mirror it foretells of a terrible illness or failure, (death of a business), and the other school of thought is, to see oneself in a mirror is a sign that you will soon be facing issues within yourself that you have been subconsciously hiding from yourself.

If the mirror is broken then will there be news of a death in the family.... Encyclopedia of Dreams

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Encyclopedia of Dreams

Polytheist

whoever sees a polytheist, and [if] the dreamer was hidden in presence, then it is indicative of: knowledge, victory over his enemies. And if he was not hidden in presence, then he will befriend the deities of the corrupt beliefs / schools.... Islamic Dream - Cafer-i Sadik

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Islamic Dream - Cafer-i Sadik

Path

A path in a dream can indicate the direction that we should take spiritually.

The idea that there is a path in life resonates with chinese thought, which calls the tao ‘the way’. In some schools of thought the left hand path represents evil or black magic.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

Drugstore

If your dream involved a drugstore, it indicates that you would benefit from a change of scene. Maybe you should consider changing your social group, or even switching schools or jobs.... My Dream Interpretation

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My Dream Interpretation

Do Your Dreams Have A Meaning?

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter. The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us. A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general. In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‘one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm’), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2] As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction. The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated. To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject. But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature -- for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked. In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds: I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‘research workers on dreams’, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‘Les savants ne sont pas curieux’, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it! And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes: Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‘interpretation of dreams’ is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

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About Dream Interpretation

Do Your Dreams Mean Anything?

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems

I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter.

The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us.

A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general.

In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‰_÷one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm‰_ª), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2]

As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction.

The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated.

To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject.

But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature - for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked.

In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds:

I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‰_÷research workers on dreams‰_ª, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‰_÷Les savants ne sont pas curieux‰_ª, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it!

And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes:

Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‰_÷interpretation of dreams‰_ª is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

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About Dream Interpretation

10 Common Dreams

TEETH

My most popular requests for dream interpretation are by far, dreams about teeth falling out. Apparently this is quite disturbing to people who have this dream...they simply MUST know what it means! In my experience, a dream about one’s teeth falling out usually symbolizes that the dreamer is having a challenge getting their voice heard, or feelings acknowledged. This may be referring to their conversations with a particular person such as their significant other, boss or friend; or can be generalized for people who are shy; to include almost everyone they come in contact with. The dreamer needs to brush up on conversational skills, believe in the value of their own opinion, learn how to be less intimidated by aggressive people, and become more assertive in making their voice heard. Once they do that, this dream (which is a common recurring dream) should evolve, show improvement or disappear altogether.


PEOPLE

Every person that appears in a dream is supposed to represent an aspect of One’s Self, and not actually be about that other person at all. Rather, it is a quality or characteristic about that person that your dream is focusing on, and how it applies to YOU.

Try to think about what aspect(s) this could be. It can be something you admire and wish to follow or incorporate into your own personality. It could be a more negative characteristic that you may dislike intensely in your waking life, but which is telling you something about yourself and your beliefs, judgments or attitude. It could be a call to alter your thinking in some manner, in order to be more open-minded and accepting of this aspect in others and your own personality, because it is hampering your spiritual growth & making life harder for yourself. The other person in your dream is always mirroring something back to you about YOURSELF.

Try to discover what that something is, and go from there. Once you get it through your head that the other person’s appearance in your dream is NOT about them, but really about YOU, then you will be much more successful interpreting your own dreams. This takes constant reinforcing - I still find myself wanting to think it’s about that other person instead of me.

FLYING

usually represents freedom from the physical body, as we experience in sleep & while dreaming where we don’t use our physical bodies but instead use our mental & spiritual bodies to experience our dreams. Everybody seems to have a natural inclination to want to fly, unless that is changed by a fear of flying due to a frightening incident in his or her waking lives. Flying = freedom. This could mean a desire for freedom, an “escape” from restraints in your physical life (like a mini-vacation for the mind) or any number of possibilities. Tie it in with the context of your dream...what were you doing in your dream besides flying? How did it make you feel? Also, the type of flying I’m referring to here is the person flying on their own without an airplane or any aircraft at all. Airplanes & other aircraft are different symbols dealing with spiritual awareness, among other things.


SCHOOL

This type of dream relates to your current “lesson in life,” and if you learn how to interpret it, you’ll find out how you are progressing...yes, folks, you’re still taking tests and getting graded! Our “true selves” are our souls, and not our physical bodies. You are a spirit / soul having a physical dream, not the other way around. Ever feel like your life is like a play, and you are acting out some role that you don’t even understand, even surprising yourself with your actions sometimes? Bingo! When we sleep, that proverbial “Veil of Forgetfulness” that prevents us from “cheating on the test” is lifted, and we are shown what type of progress we are making (or, GULP, not making) and given guidance on what to do next. We always have free will in our waking physical lives, though.

If we stubbornly refuse to finish our tests, then we have that right - but we are doomed to repeat it until we pass it. And each time we turn away from the test, the next time it will be more unpleasant until finally we are forced to acknowledge it’s importance for our growth. The things we consider vitally important in our waking physical lives are not nearly as important as the TRUE reason we are here, which is to overcome our shortcomings so that we may get closer to our Source / God / Higher Power. To avoid learning the lesson is like forcing your soul to a fate similar to the mythical Greek god named Sisyphus who was doomed to keep rolling a boulder uphill for eternity, only to watch it roll back down & have to repeat the same tedious hard chore again & again. That sounds like school to me! So pay attention to the messages in dreams about schools, and you may advance faster. Do you really want to repeat kindergarten again?


CAR or VEHICLE

This is supposed to symbolize you in your waking life, in your physical body. Your physical body is used by the soul pretty much like we use a car...it’s driven for awhile and we give it gas / nourishment & repairs as needed until it stops running, and then we go back home. Pay attention to your car, which symbolizes your physical body. Are you behind the wheel, or is someone else in control? You want to be in charge of your life, naturally. What is the color & condition of this vehicle? Do you seem to be driving it the right way, on a safe road in good condition, or is the road rocky, winding, or suddenly ends at a cliff? That would signal that you need redirection. The bigger the vehicle, the more energy you may be successfully using for your daily lessons, depending on the context of your dream. Note all clues as to how you are faring, and make adjustments accordingly.


HOUSE

You drive a car, but typically you LIVE in a house/apartment. Dreams about a house symbolize a larger aspect of your Self, and the aspects of self, which make us whole. Each room is said to symbolize a different aspect of your Self, for example:

An Attic symbolizes your Higher Self, and your spiritual development & progress. Look at other symbols in the attic of your dream, and try to evaluate what they mean. Also pay attention to the feeling(s) you experience in your dream...is it serious, enlightening or what, exactly? All these things are clues for you.

A Bathroom would symbolize the need for cleansing / purging / elimination of something in your life that isn’t quite working, or that has served it’s purpose and now it’s time to move on.


A Kitchen would symbolize the need or act of supplying nourishment or food for the body / mind / soul...whatever is currently “cooking” or developing in your life.

If the food is plentiful, you have what you need.

If the cupboard is bare, time to go shopping for new nourishment, and you need to figure out what is needed for that “shopping list.”

A Dining Room is similar to the kitchen, but has more to do with immediate needs for supplying & utilizing nourishment, and less with the preparation or taking stock of those needs.

The Main Room or Living Room symbolizes your daily interactions with others, and often you will have other people appearing in your dreams in this room. Remember, they represent aspects of YOUR Self, and not themselves.

(See PEOPLE, above)

Bedrooms symbolize the unconscious mind aspect of your self, rest, dreams, sometimes and sexuality issues in your life.

The Upstairs symbolizes your spiritual awareness aspect of self, or the Higher Self that holds all the keys or knowledge to this life’s role you are acting out, and always has your higher good looked after, no matter how it might seem otherwise.

The Downstairs / Basement symbolizes your subconscious mind / aspect of self, which deals with habits, old coping skills, self-regulation, ego.

That’s usually the part of our Selves that makes us feel “torn” between knowing we should do one thing, and inexplicably ending up doing the opposite.

(Don’t you HATE that?)

Old belief patterns & fears have to be corrected, if that is the case. Tackle & overcome it, and you will feel much more peaceful about your life.

The Ground Floor of a house represents your daily agenda; what’s currently going on in your life.

Revisiting Old Houses from Childhood or Earlier Times: this points to issues that probably are resurfacing in your current life, and need to be looked at, analyzed, and healed so you can move forward and not backward.

If you find yourself repeating the same old tired mistakes, or dealing with the same old tired fears, chances are you will have this dream.

A Hallway symbolizes that you have reached an area that is necessary to journey through in order to get to the other side, and it may be a narrow path that has to be traversed with care and awareness.

If you have that “closed in, claustrophobic feeling” then you need to expand your awareness/open your mind to more possibilities for completing this phase of your journey.

TORNADO

This symbol points to emotional turmoil, as in a “whirlwind of emotions”; and / or rapid or sudden changes in your life.

It is a sign to “get a grip” on what is possibly spinning out of control & deal more effectively with your emotions. Meditation and finding some private “thinking time” for yourself might be a good idea.


COLORS

Pink: the color of love in all its forms. Often used to show healing through love.

Red: passion or anger.

Black: the unconscious mind; void; death of the old.

Grey: fear or confusion. White: truth, “coming clean,” purity; can also be symbolic of death & new beginnings.

Green: healing, growth, newness.

Blue: spirituality; could be a metaphor for “being blue” (look at context of dream).

Yellow: peacefulness, hope (as in “sunny disposition”); could be a cowardice metaphor.


NUMBERS

I am not a numerologist, but I will put a few basic numbers here

One: unity, completeness.

Two: balance of yin-yang principles, or male / female energies-either it’s needed or it’s achieved.

Three: (common dream symbol) the trinity of the Father, Son & Holy Spirit, and the 3 principles uniting in harmony, as in body-mind-spirit harmony. This dream has an important spiritual message for you - pay attention!

Five: changes!


BABY or PREGNANCY

Newness or creation in your life, a new aspect of self is being formed and coming into being!... Common Dreams

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Common Dreams

Planet

Idea, understanding of great importance; teacher, luminary. Each planet has intelligence or vibration and is interconnected with all other heavenly bodies. Special vibratory rate in relationship to self and others; cosmic influence, energy, expanded awareness. Harmony of cosmic movement; purpose, design. We leave the body at night during the sleep state to study on different planets, incorporating the lessons each has to teach us; they are more advanced schools.

Sun - Light, truth, spiritual center, God force, Christ light; power, energy, masculinity. All life depends upon its light; pivotal force in our lives.

Moon - Unconscious, emotions, responsiveness, psychic awareness; femininity, intuition, creativity; reflector of light and truth.

Mercury - Mind, thought, communication, intuition, changeability; messenger of the gods.

Venus - Love, beauty, harmony, gentleness, emotion, femininity.

Earth - Growth, learning, grounding, time-space awareness; centeredness, compassion, creativity.

Mars - Activity, adventure, assertion, sexual energy; aggressiveness, hostility, passion.

Jupiter - Expansion, wealth, abundance of spiritual knowledge and expression, benevolence, luck.

Saturn - Discipline, learning, slowness of time and production; refinement.

Uranus - Awakening, transcendence, sudden fluctuations, changes, impact; extremes, unusual abilities.

Neptune - Unconscious, mysticism, inner self, psychic awareness.

Pluto - Consciousness unfoldment, transformation, spiritual expansion.... The Dream Books Symbols

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The Dream Books Symbols

School

Life is school; you are here only to learn and grow. You are taught by all people and all situations. Be enthusiastic; you are going to go through it anyway. Lessons never change until you learn them, so might as well get in and work through them now. Each night you are out of the body and learn in schools on higher levels. Each level of consciousness is teaching you something about the nature of self.... The Dream Books Symbols

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The Dream Books Symbols

Nun

Graduates of parochial schools have numerous associations with nuns that go beyond the scope of this book. Otherwise, nuns can represent everything from spirituality to religious authority to sexual repression.... Dream Symbols in The Dream Encyclopedia

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Dream Symbols in The Dream Encyclopedia

Family

Family relationships have been studied and written about for centuries, from the brothers Cain and Abel, through Joseph the favored son, to evil stepmothers in fairy stories and Mrs Robinson in The Graduate.

Whilst whole schools of family therapy have been developed to help address the issues that emerge within a family context, it is worthwhile looking at one theory of a child’s development into an adult as it sheds much light on dreams about the family. This is Jung’s theory of the process of ‘individuation’, one of his most interesting and important theories. In short, individuation refers to the processes involved in becoming a self-aware and independent human being. The area of being to which we refer when we say ‘I’ or ‘me’ is our sense of self, which Jung calls the ego. A vital part of the process of individuation is to meet and integrate, or become independent of, your childhood patterns. This includes desire for the love of the parent of the opposite sex, rivalry mingled with dependence with the parent of the same sex, and the move away from total dependence on both parents.

An absence of a father’s or mother’s love can be especially traumatic, as parents are the soil out of which your sense of self must emerge. And even if your parents are no longer alive or you never had a relationship with them, their impact on your psyche can be just as profound. Without a doubt, parents are powerful, emotive figures in dreams but a person’s identity cannot gain any real independence while still dominated by these internal forces. Psychologically, this struggle for individuality should take place within the safety of the family unit.

Unfortunately this does not always happen and in dreams, images of family members may be manipulated so that issues and conflicts that have been unresolved during Jung’s process of individuation can be worked out.

Family dreams are so common because most of the conflicts and problems in your waking life are experienced first within a psychological environment laid down by your family. It is as if a pattern has been imprinted that will continue to appear until it is broken willingly. The way you were brought up has such a profound effect on your psychological health that any dream you have of family members will probably have a unique and highly specific meaning to you, depending on what your family means to you, your own experience of family life and other related attitudes. Because there is such variety here, you will need first to define your present relationship and feelings about the member of your family that features in the dream.

Individual family members can represent the various archetypes in your dreams. For example, the father can represent the masculine principle of authority and discipline, whilst the mother represents the feminine principle of nurturing and protection. In many instances, dreams featuring your family members can be reassuring. They may give you confidence and guidance, as well as a feeling that you are supported and loved. On the other hand, they may also highlight current or longterm problems within your family or personal relationships. Because they can replicate values, attitudes and emotional or social responses towards living that you have absorbed from your family, all future relationships outside the family are influenced in some way by the ones you first develop within your family. In times of stress, therefore, your dreams might use scenarios involving family members to try and put things right or reveal and confirm the conflict.

Bear in mind that each dream about a family member must be considered in context, and what the idea of a family means to you may not mean the same to another person. For example, Western concepts such as individuation, sibling rivalry or Freud’s Oedipus complex would make no sense in those cultures where an uncle or grandparent is considered no less significant than mothers or fathers. See also RELATIONSHIPS.... The Element Encyclopedia

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Classroom

So many dreams are set in the classroom or school that it may be one of the most frequent dream settings. The primary focus of such dreams is on your own level of competence and how it may be reflected in the eyes of others. The theme of fitting in is perhaps why so many anxiety dreams that reflect a sense of insecurity and failure are set in schools. See also SCHOOL AND WORK.... The Element Encyclopedia

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Fish

Water is the element in which fish live, so there may be a strong emotional factor in a dream about fish; fish can also represent unconscious insights, as the unconscious is often represented by the sea, the fish being ideas flitting through it. According to Jung, fish are symbols used in the dream to mimic impulses that suddenly dart out of the unconscious and which have a frightening or redeeming effect in waking life. In the realm of sleep, fish are considered harbingers of inspiration and creativity, so a fish or schools of fish glimpsed beneath the surface often represent unconscious material or truths hidden within yourself. To dream of a fish’s eye symbolizes a watchful and diligent nature, but to see a dead fish signifies a worry about the way you interact with others. Is your lack of emotional warmth turning you into a cold fish? If you dreamed of a fish leaping out of the ocean before returning to the waves or fish caught in the net and brought to the surface, this may indicate the brief emergence of intuition.

If the fish are dirty, injured or ugly, this doesn’t mean that you are too; it just means the phase you’re currently in may be painful and tough. This is a time for patience and gentleness with yourself.

If fish are swimming just below the surface, they may represent the wisdom you have not yet brought to consciousness in waking life, whilst dead fish in your dream may suggest you have failed to express your basic urges or emotions. If, in your dream, the fish are in an aquarium, this may refer to aspects of your personality that are prevented from expressing themselves, or constricting emotional conditions in general. The dream may also refer to aspects of yourself that need to be nourished emotionally; a goldfish bowl may simply suggest boredom or a lack of privacy or confidentiality.

If you dream of a fish that needs your care, it is likely that you are a creative, sensitive person who has become trapped in a lifestyle that inhibits self-expression. According to Freud, fish are a phallic symbol because of their elongated shape, and, because females spawn hundreds of eggs, he also associated them with fertility.

The symbol of Pisces in the Zodiac is a fish, and dream fish may perhaps be reminding you of a person you know born under that sign. The fish is also one of the oldest symbols of Christianity, so a dream of a fish, fishing or eating fish may also reflect your desire for spiritual nourishment. Fish may also appear in your dream as messengers telling you that something does not feel right, that something ’smells fishy’; alternatively, they may be telling you that you are feeling misplaced or you don’t belong, like a ’fish out of water’. A fish on a hook may suggest accepting something completely, without hesitation or question; but be attentive to what being a ’wet fish’ means. See also PETS.... The Element Encyclopedia

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School And Work

Dreams that focus on school and the workplace reflect your anxiety about how well you are being perceived or how well you are performing in waking life.

If you are still at school, or if you have a job and your dream referred to your actual workplace, then your dreaming mind was probably referring to your everyday concerns.

If you have left school, or the school or workplace in your dreams is unfamiliar to you, your dreaming mind may have been suggesting a past feeling or experience that has relevance for your current situation. Such dreams could also indicate a sense of restriction and your resentment that you can’t spend your time doing what you want. They could also be commenting on your social interaction with your peers and authority figures, since relating to others is an essential part of school and work.

Jung regarded dreams as teachers and guides on the road towards wholeness; from his perspective, dreams that feature schools and teachers were especially significant because schools are places of learning and maturing into a healthy adult. Jobs are closely linked to self-esteem in waking life, so the type of job that features in your dream—and the reward or lack of reward associated with it—can be significant indicators of your feelings of self-worth and of the success or failure of your approach to life’s challenges.

Education... The Element Encyclopedia

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Workplace

Schools, colleges, universities and the workplace have much in common. They are all centers of learning, anxiety and ambition, and places where people interact and learn from each other. This is why the unconscious may use them as interchangeable dream metaphors. Your boss may appear in your dream as a teacher, or colleagues may appear in the guise of school friends or classmates. So if a dream places you in a workplace, remember to look for any links with school scenarios.

If your dream featured your actual workplace and colleagues you work with everyday, it may have been highlighting your preoccupation with your job. It may also have been trying to draw your attention to a specific aspect of your job. You spend much of your time at work, so work is of considerable importance emotionally.

If you are comfortable at work, dreams of the workplace and the people with whom you work may become symbols of reassurance and reward; but if you are not comfortable at work, they can become symbols of frustration.

If you had a dream in which you were performing mindless repetitive tasks on an assembly line, perhaps you feel as if you are being treated like a mindless automaton in waking life or that others are making relentless demands on you. Or do you feel that you are losing your sense of identity in your job or that people in your life are taking you for granted?... The Element Encyclopedia

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We Are Interdimensional Beings

Dreams begin to awaken us to the fact that we are spiritual or interdimensional beings, in the third dimension, or time- space, but not of it. They are like a letter from the higher self to the conscious mind. They awaken us to higher resources of knowledge within ourselves, giving us information on what is happening in our daily lives and how to meet and move through the problems that face us. Dreams also give us information on the future, so we are forced to ask, “How could I know a thing like that?”

A dream helps us realize that we are here only temporarily on the stage of waking reality. What we call life is really a school. There are many schools or levels of consciousness in the universe, and earth is one of the most important. During our sojourn here we are learning more about the true nature of our beings. We are learning that we are infinite creative energy or love energy, and that all of our hurts, disappointments and disillusions come from a failure to recognize this truth of who and what we are.

The name of the game is growth. In all our experiences we either go through or grow through them. If we just go through them, then we will repeat them again and again until we learn the lesson behind the appearances. If we grow through them, we are free to move on to the next step in the learning process. But to understand more about the game of growing and learning, we will look at two age old concepts: karma and reincarnation.... Dreampedia

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Interpretation Of Dreams

“All dreams are given for the benefit of the individual, would he but interpret them correctly.”
EDGAR CAYCE

Most dreams are full of images: of people dead and alive, known and unknown, animals both domestic and wild, landscapes and buildings familiar and strange, or any number of other symbolic images such as jewelry, household things, clothing, and so on. A dream usually has some kind of a story line. You may find yourself on an adventure of some kind. You may dream of celebrities or other famous people either from the present or the past.

I once had a fascinating dream of visiting the president Woodrow Wilson, who had been in office during the time of World War I, long before I was even born. During my dream visit to the president, we talked of many things of a psychic and occult nature. I wondered what it meant. When I discussed this dream with my dreamwork partner, who was a good bit older than I and very knowledgeable about matters concerning the occult, he told me that Woodrow Wilson had held seances in the White House! At the time, I was just beginning my own studies of the occult and having psychic experiences on a regular basis.

Food is another symbol that often appears in dreams. The kind of food and how it is presented and eaten (if eating occurs) are matters for the dreamer to understand. Food dreams may relate to what you had for supper—or what you wanted to have and didn’t get. Or you may have food concerns, such as being on a diet to lose weight or trying to gain weight.

The number of symbols that the dream-mind can produce is practically endless, and most of these symbols are up for individual interpretation. Some, however, have universal meaning. We’ll discuss mostly the first kind in this chapter.

PERSONAL DREAM SYMBOLS

One of the best ways to get at the meaning of the symbols in your dreams is by free association. This is the method made popular by the psychologist Sigmund Freud. In this method, you simply go with the first thing that pops into your mind when the trigger word is given. Do the exercises presented on pages 48–50 in order to begin to get familiar with your own word associations.

AMPLIFICATION OF SYMBOLIC MEANINGS

Once you have identified a symbol in a dream, you can use the free association process to get at its meaning. If you don’t immediately get an associative thought about the dream symbol, work backward through your feelings and experiences with the symbol until you hit something that fits or makes sense. Suppose, for example, that you see a tiger in a dream. Do you like tigers or are they an object of fear? Maybe you saw a nature film recently about tigers and are concerned about their survival as a species. The important thing is to discover what a tiger means to you in the present, for the meanings of your symbols can change over time.

As you begin to work with your dreams on a regular basis and gain a high level of ability to recall your dreams (which we’ll discuss in chapter 5), you will become familiar with your own personal symbolic style. Most of us are influenced symbolically by the objects we are familiar with—such as religious symbols like crosses and pictures of saints or holy people—and also by our everyday life experiences. For example, if you have a pet of any kind, you are likely to dream about that animal. Of course, you may dream about animals even if you don’t keep a pet, and you may dream about wild animals. But if you dream of your own pet, it will have personal significance to you alone.

Sometimes you have a dream that seems to complete some unfinished business of the day—say you had a math problem you couldn’t solve and you dreamed yourself in a classroom with the solution written on the blackboard. Freud believed that dreams were “wish fulfillment” vehicles, and it is true that we can dream of things or experiences that we want (such as getting a date with a particular person) but dreams are much, much more than simple wish fulfillment. They are complex and multileveled, as you will realize by working steadily with your dreams.

“Then your I is no longer your mundane little self but the I of the Big Dreamer who is dreaming the whole universe.”
Fred A. Wolf, Physicist

Most dream symbols are not to be taken literally. You often need to do a bit of sleuthing to get at what the message of the dream symbol, or story, is for you. An example I read in one dream book was a dream of Bob Hope hopping on a pogo stick. At first, this seems nonsensical, but the dreamer was depressed and the dream was interpreted as “Hope springs eternal.” Here’s an example of a recent series of dreams of my own, concerning food.

  • I was preparing to go on an eating program that required the elimination of all sugar, and as soon as I had set a date to begin I started having dreams of all kinds of luscious desserts—beautifully iced and decorated cakes, pies piled high with whipped cream, the most enticing confections of chocolate from cakes to cookies and everything in between, pastries stuffed with sweet cheese and iced with thick sugar, fancy French fruit tarts of every description.
  • At first, I took this to be simple resistance of my unconscious to changing my eating habits, but I actually don’t eat a lot of sweets, and when I do have dessert I favor simple, homey things like custard, stewed fruit, or fruit cobbler. I’ve never had a taste for heavily iced cakes, plus I am one of the few people on the planet who doesn’t like chocolate! So why was I dreaming of all these fancy sweet foods that I wouldn’t even want to eat?
  • My first take on the dreams—of which there were several during a week or so—was that I was feeling deprived in advance and that my imagination was plying me with these luscious images of sweets to weaken my decision to eliminate sweets. But this didn’t make a lot of sense, as the fancy confections weren’t what I’d want to eat anyway. So I looked deeper.
  • What was food as a symbol to me, especially this kind of elaborately prepared party food? Well, party food means a party—or at least company for dinner. I’d been going through a period of relative isolation, partly because I was busy writing and partly because I hadn’t been feeling up to par. My social life had dropped to almost zero. The dreams were actually telling me that I was feeling deprived of—not the coming lack of sweets—but what special food, especially desserts, represents socially. Food of course represents nourishment; however, my dreams were not about nutrition! My first interpretation of deprivation was definitely a clue to the true meaning of the dreams. Yet they were a message that I needed, not sweets, but some sweet occasions and to take the time to be with people more. Can you think of a get-together that doesn’t involve food? Usually fancy food, and always, desserts.
  • Using this as an example, think of what dreams of fancy desserts might mean to you. And if you’ve ever dreamed of food, try to remember what kind of food and under what circumstances you dreamed of it. Then think of what those various foods might symbolize for you.

Here’s another example along the same lines, but with a different twist—that of a lemon peel!

  • A friend had been struggling with his weight, and he had decided to quit drinking his nightly martini in order to cut out some calories. He had decided to switch to a single glass of wine with dinner instead. He did this and found himself enjoying his new way of dining. But then he started having dreams about martinis. For about a week, he told me, he had nothing but dreams featuring martinis, with a twist of lemon peel. He had always put olives in his martinis, not lemon peel, so this puzzled him. When he told me about the dreams, I flashed on the standard language of a bartender, who when taking an order for a martini will say, “Do you want a twist?” After some discussion of what the word twist meant to him, he revealed that he had recently twisted his ankle and it had been quite painful, but he hadn’t bothered to see a doctor about the problem. His dream was showing him that a “twist” was in need of his attention. It didn’t relate to his martini drinking at all, except that this was a familiar picture and dreams always speak in our own language, even if they do twist it around a bit!

It is interesting to note that some types of dreams that we know to be quite common have never been reported from sleep labs (as least not as far as I have found in my research). One of these is the nightmare. It seems that people don’t want to tell their deepest fears to a sleep lab researcher. Another common type is the wet dream, so named for when a male ejaculates semen while dreaming (though females also have this type of sexual dream). It is interesting to note that most of the subjects in sleep labs are young male college students, whom one might presume to often have wet dreams. But these are, apparently, considered too private to dream when under observation.

Most dreams are not to be taken literally; just because you dream of someone dying does not mean the person will die. In fact, the literal interpretation of dreams can be dangerous and cause fear and anxiety. Also, dream books are not to be trusted. It’s worth repeating that you have your own set of inner symbolic meanings. What a cat means to me—an avid cat lover—and what a cat means to someone who hates or fears cats would be something quite different. Always remember that your inner symbol-producing mechanism is yours alone, unique. That being emphasized, there are a few symbols that can be considered universal, such as the ocean or water representing the unconscious processes.

The best way for you to learn to interpret your own personal symbol system is by continually paying attention to your dreams, writing them down, and doing your own interpretations. Dream interpretation is an art, not a science, and no scientific sleep lab can read the content or measure the meaning of dreams. Isis, the ancient Egyptian goddess queen, was believed to say “No mortal has lifted my veil,” and this can well apply to the scientific efforts to penetrate the mysteries of dream in sleep labs.

If you are just beginning to pay attention to your dreams, begin the process of interpretation by recording the symbols that appear most frequently. This applies especially to any recurring dreams or motifs you may experience. For example, I know that when my cat Fuzz (who’s dead now) appears in a dream, it means my heart center is the subject of the dream. Depending on the story line of the dream and what Fuzz is doing or how we are interacting, I can figure out what the dream message about my heart is.

“There are a lot of people on the planet right now who don’t think that dreams are important. Perhaps it is that attitude which contributes to the ill health of the planet as a whole. If so, it depends more and more on you, the Spiritual Warriors of your generation, to weave the dreams that can heal the planet.”

Dr. Laurel Ann Reinhardt, “Dream Weaving,” in The Thundering Years by Julie Johnson

  • Recently, I dreamed that Fuzz had been hit by a car, but I knew instinctively that he was still alive. My brother was waiting outside in a car and I asked him to take me to find Fuzz and get an emergency vet. He did and Fuzz was saved. The dream came on the heels of a severe disappointment (one might say I was heartbroken), but I was being told that everything would come out all right in the end, which it did.
  • What is interesting about this dream is that even though I did not see the cat get hit by the car, I knew he was still alive. This told me that although I had been hurt emotionally, I would get over it. It also showed me that help was at hand—my brother was waiting in the car, and a vet was readily available. I had friends I could turn to who would help me to heal from a hurtful experience. In this way, our dreams spill over into everyday life.
  • The world of dream and intuition is really not divorced from our everyday reality, not a thing apart. Most people today think their dreams have nothing to do with real life, but they are wrong. We are all multifaceted beings with complexities of which often we are hardly aware. Too many people operate solely on linear thinking (the standard modern-day mode that is taught to young people in schools) and aren’t aware that there are other ways to think and to obtain information. As Seth, the “spirit guide” that Jane Roberts “channeled” in a series of books “by” Seth, says, “You must change your ideas about dreaming, alter your concepts about it, before you can begin to explore it. Otherwise, your own waking prejudice will close the door.”

    All of the many facets of our personalities are operating all the time, even when we aren’t conscious of them, just like our body chemistry goes on about its business when we are totally unaware of its functioning. Dreams can speak to parts of ourselves that we are ignoring, but we can’t get the benefit from them unless we pay attention and approach their symbolic messages with an open mind and trusting heart.

    While the symbolism in dreams may require interpretation, when we have difficulty with it we must realize that its purpose isn’t to mystify us. As Dr. Jung says in his autobiography, Memories, Dreams, Reflections:

    • I was never able to agree with Freud that the dream is a “façade” behind which its meaning lies hidden—a meaning already known but maliciously, so to speak, withheld from consciousness. To me dreams are a part of nature, which harbors no intentions to deceive but expresses something as best it can just as a plant grows or an animal seeks its food as best it can.

    In working with your own personal dream symbols and motifs to decipher the meaning of your dreams, you may need to come at them from all angles. The following mind-mapping technique is especially helpful for those who function better using pictures and images, colors and drawings, than using a strictly verbal or writing mode.

    As you practice interpreting your dreams and get more deeply into the process, it will become an enjoyable habit and you’ll soon feel like an old pro at the game. You will get better and better, and your confidence will start to soar. Even if you have only a scrap of a dream to go on, it can lead to fruitful ideas. Here’s an example from my personal files:

    • The Dream: A blond man speaks to me at a hotel of some sort. He breaks into French as his English fails him, and though I don’t know French well I understand what he is saying. He gives me a key, which looks like the key to the security lock on my front door in real life. I ask what it is for and he replies that I will find out. When I go back to my room at the hotel I find that the key fits into a TV set, tuning it to a higher octave or a channel, like UHF, but much higher than that. I watch something on this “TV” but don’t really understand it.
    • My interpretation of this brief fragment (for there was more I didn’t remember) is that I am being given the “key” to a higher channel of myself. I don’t yet know how to use this channel, and I can’t understand what is being shown on this new type of TV. In other words, I am receiving communications in a language I don’t fully understand. This dream had great meaning for me, as I was at that time in the process of becoming “psychic,” but didn’t really know what it meant or where it would lead. Later on, I experienced the “opening of the psychic door” on a trip to Germany, became a Tarot card reader, a professional astrologer, and a psychotherapist. This dream seemed to forecast these developments. That the man was blond suggests the Sun, or Higher Mind. His speaking in French might be a reference to my own French ancestors, all of whom spoke French as their native language, yet it was not taught to me so I grew up speaking English from day one. This hinted that I already “knew” the “foreign” language from hearing it spoken as a child.

    With a little skill, you’ll be able to start integrating your dreams into everyday life. We’ll get into this in the next chapter, where we discuss how you can use dreams for specific purposes. However, please approach the entire subject of your dreams, their interpretations, and how you can use them with an open mind and in a relaxed state. Getting tense over interpretation is counterproductive and will block your efforts to make connections.... Dreampedia

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Activation-synthesis Model Of Dreaming

The activation-synthesis model of dreaming was proposed in 1977 by Robert McCarley and J. Allan Hobson of Harvard Medical School. Examining the purely physiological correlates of dreaming, Hobson and McCarley believed they had put forward a hypothesis that refuted the notion that dreams are meaningful, especially as this notion was formulated by Sigmund Freud and promulgated in the tradition of dream interpretation he initiated.

During rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, the stage of sleep most closely connected with dreaming, a portion of the brain called the pons (located in the primitive hindbrain) generates electrical signals that go to many different brain areas, including those associated with motor activities, sensory activities, and conscious thought. Hobson and McCarley hypothesized that one of the effects of this electrical activity is to send a series of essentially random images, feelings, and so forth to the higher mental centers of the forebrain. This is the “activation” stage of the theory.

In normal waking consciousness, the fore- brain sorts through various kinds of internal and external sensory input to create a meaningful experience of the world. Faced with a barrage of disconnected inputs during REM sleep, the higher mental centers attempt to impose order on the incoming messages, creating whatever narrative structure dreams have. This is the “synthesis” stage of the theory. Many dreams are just masses of incoherent images representing incoming groups of signals that the brain was simply not able to synthesize.

For anyone who has been exasperated by the convolutions of Freudian or other schools of dream interpretation, the activation-synthesis theory has a certain iconoclastic appeal because it dismisses dreams as just so much nonsense. How- ever, because almost everyone has had at least a few truly insightful dreams, the theory is ultimately unsatisfying. Also, on a purely physiological level, it is an incomplete theory because it does not offer an explanation for the dreams that occur during non-REM sleep.... Dreampedia

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Alfred Adler

Alfred Adler (1870–1937) was an Austrian psychiatrist who developed a personality theory referred to as individual psychology. He was at one time closely associated with Sigmund Freud, but broke with Freud to develop his own form of psychotherapy. Adler placed much less emphasis on dreams than other schools of psychiatry, and his attitude toward dreams is somewhat inconsistent. Even though he did not develop a full-blown theory of dreams, his thoughts on this subject had a significant influence on later dream theorizing.

To oversimplify the difference between Freud and Adler, Freud focused on sex and aggression and Adler focused on power and status. Adler viewed much human motivation as originating during the lengthy period of child- hood, when we are relatively powerless to control our lives. In response to this feeling of helpless- ness, the human being, according to Adler, develops a powerful urge to master his or her world. This desire for control and mastery becomes the central drive in human life.

Dreams would clearly have a different significance for Adler than they had for Freud. In Freudian theory, dreams are fundamentally arenas within which inner tensions, many of them safely hidden from view in the unconscious, could be safely discharged. Often these tensions have roots in infantile conflicts, making dreams pasoriented. For Adler, on the other hand, dreams become part of the larger project of the individual to master his or her life. In particular, dreams come about as a result of an effort—whether that effort is effective or not—to anticipate future situations, so as to allow us to imaginatively prepare for them. Although dreams are intended to help the dreamer acquire more control over his or her world, Adler recognized that many dreams are maladaptive, in the sense that, if one were to actu- ally follow their guidance, the practical results would be to detract from, rather than enhance, the goal of mastery over one’s environment.

Adler’s views provide a radically different perspective on dreams from Freud’s. For Freud dreams serve to discharge inner tensions originat- ing in the past and hidden in the unconscious, whereas for Adler the function of dreams is to anticipate the future. Also, one of the results of Adler’s portrayal of dreams is to make them more related to the thoughts and motivations of waking consciousness, in marked contrast to Freud’s portrayal, which emphasizes the disjunction between the waking and the dreaming state. Adler’s ideas, particularly as developed and for- mulated by later theorists, have influenced many contemporary therapists.... Dreampedia

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