Dream Interpretation Recurring object | Dream Meanings


If a specific object or objects appears and reappears in your dream, it tends to point out a valuable perspective or new approach towards a problem. Try to take note of the function of the object, what purpose it serves and in what kind of situation you would be likely to find it, as it can show how your response to a situation can be improved. For example, a set of embroidery needles may suggest you should pay more attention to detail, whereas a hammer would suggest you might profit from a direct, hard-hitting approach.

The Element Encyclopedia | Theresa Cheung


Recurring Object | Dream Meaning

The keywords of this dream: Recurring Object

Finding A Lost Object

(See Compensation; Finding something)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Floating Objects

Dreams about floating objects suggest that you are feeling a lack of connection or a need to become more grounded. Also see “Telekinesis.”... My Dream Interpretation

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My Dream Interpretation

Glow / Glowing Object

To see a glow - or any glowing object - in your dream, symbolizes enlightenment. New light has been shed onto a situation and you have gained a fresh perspective. Therefore any dream which features a bright or pleasant glow predicts a swift improvement in all that deeply concerns you.... My Dream Interpretation

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My Dream Interpretation

Lost Object

(See Compensation; Finding something)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Lost Objects

Your dream suggests a preoccupation with lack and limitation, for we are usually looking for something that we already have.

The feeling of searching for something important and being unable to find it is challenging enough when it happens in life. In the language of symbols, it also taps into a deep fear shared by all people: the elusive search for meaning that all of us have to face from time to time in our lives. On the face of it, a dream of searching for a lost object has a primary purpose of helping us relieve stress so we can wake up the next day and face our day-to-day lives with greater psychic balance. This is the purpose of all recurring dreams of this nature.

If you have this dream on a regular basis, it may simply be a convenient way for your unconscious to process the pressures of everyday living. What it is that you are searching for should be your first consideration. Your personal associations with this object will reveal what you sense is currently elusive. When in doubt, ask yourself, “What does this thing do, or what is it for?” Keys represent your access to the various compartments of your life. Your wallet connects you to abundance and the ability to meet your needs in the world.

A more personal or specific item should be viewed through whatever meaning you assign to it.

If there is no specific thing that you are searching for or you do not know what it is that you have lost, the dream may be pointing to a free-floating sense of being inadequately prepared for some situation in your life. Where you are looking offers the next shade of meaning. Your own home connects to your personal sense of self. Any other environment should be used to guide you; where you feel that something has been lost may be telling you that a certain area of your life has left you feeling incomplete.... Complete Dictionary of Dreams

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Complete Dictionary of Dreams

Mechanical Objects

Mechanical objects may represent mechanical or robotic thinking.

A mechanical failure may mention that your thinking is faulty and dysfunctional. It may point to a difficult or complex problem that needs to be manipulated by your mind.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

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Ariadne's Book of Dream

Moving Objects

If you dream of objects moving around by themselves, it suggests that you are feeling a lack of connection or a need to become more grounded. Also see “Telekinesis.”... My Dream Interpretation

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My Dream Interpretation

Object / Objection

An object in dreams can often give angibility to spiritual concepts.

A cross, for instance, will suggests sacrifice to some, conviction to others and refusal to even more.

To object to something suggests that we cannot accept information given at this time.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

Object / Objection

Psychological / emotional perspective: To object to or disagree with a statement or idea in dreams suggests that we may have already formed an opinion in waking life or that the statement opposes our own code of conduct. From an emotional perspective we cannot make a commitment.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

Object / Objection

Material aspects: Often in waking life we are unable to speak out against an injustice or a wrong move. Our dreams will often give us the opportunity to object or protest against such things.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

Objection

Legal action is impending. ... New American Dream Dictionary

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New American Dream Dictionary

Objective

This dream refers to the objectives or ambitions of the dreamer. To see yourself completing your goals in dreams announces that you will also achieve them in real life. On the contrary, not reaching them is a bad sign, since it means setbacks will delay your plans. However, if the dream highlights the word “objective” itself, it may be that the dream is indicating that you should be more objective when considering your problems.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

Recurring Character

You may dream of a particular person who appears repeatedly in your dreams. This may be someone you are related to or close to, but it could also be someone you barely know or even someone who is no longer alive. When a recurring character appears in your dream it is often because they are associated with a particular feeling or set of experiences, and even if you no longer keep in touch with that person, they can still appear in your dream when you are affected by types of feelings you had when you knew them. In other words, recurring characters are often pictures of patterns that are operating in your present-day life. Sometimes recurring characters can also represent qualities you possess but are not using, or qualities you admire but do not feel you have. In general, when it comes to recurring characters, if this person is someone you feel positive about they represent qualities you can and should apply to your current life. Those people you associate with painful memories tend to represent feelings and patterns that are affecting you in your current experiences.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

Recurring Dreams

If we keep a record of our dreams it will soon become obvious that some of our dream themes, charac­ters or places recur again and again. These recurrences are of various types.

A cenain theme may have begun in childhood and continued throughout our life—either without change, or as a gradually changing series of dreams. It might be that the feature which recurs is a setting, perhaps a house we visit again and again, but the details differ. Sometimes a senes of such dreams begin after or dunng a particular event or phase of our life, such as puberty or marriage.

Example: ‘This dream has recurred over 30 years. There is a railway station, remote in a rural area, a central waiting room with platform going round all sides. On the platform mill hundreds of people, all men I think. They are all ragged, thin, dirty and unshaven. I know I am among them. I looked up at the mountainside and there is a guard watching us. He is cruel looking, oriental, in green fatigues. On his peaked cap is a red star. He carries a machine gun. Then I looked at the men around me and I realise they are all me. Each one has my face. I am looking at myself. Then I feel fear and terror (Anon.).

The theme of the dream can incorporate anxious emotions, such as the above example, or any aspect of experi­ence. One woman, an epileptic, reports a dream which is the same in every detail and occurs every night. In general such dreams recur because there are ways the dreamer habitually responds to their internal or external world. Because their attitude or response is unchanging, the dream which reflects it remains the same.

It is noticeable in those who explore their dreams using such techniques as described under dream pro­cessing that recurring themes disappear or change because the attitudes or habitual anxieties which gave rise to them have been met or transformed.

A recurring environment in a dream where the other fac­tors change is not the same. We use the same words over and over in speech, yet each sentence may be different.

The envi­ronment or character represents a particular aspect of oneself, but the different events which surround it show it in the changing process of our psychological growth. Where there is no such change, as in the examples above, it suggests an area of our mental emotional self is stuck in a habitual feeling state or response.

Some recurring dreams can be ‘stopped’ by simply receiv­ing information about them. One woman dreamt the same dream from childhood. She was walking past railings in the town she lived in as a child. She always woke in dread and perspiration from this dream. At 40 she told her sister about it.

The response was ‘Oh, that’s simple. Don’t you remember that when you were about four we were walking past those railings and we were set on by a bunch of boys. Then I said to them, ‘Don’t hurt us, our mother’s dead!” They left us alone, but you should have seen the look on your face.’ After realis­ing the dread was connected with the loss of her mother, the dream never recurred. Another woman who repeatedly dreamt of being in a tight and frightening place, found the dream never returned after she had connected it to being in the womb.

Recurring dreams, such as that of the railings, suggest that pan of the process underlying dreams is a self regulatory (homocostatic) one.

The dream process tries to present trou­blesome emotions or situations to the conscious mind of the dreamer to resolve the trauma or difficulty underlying the dream.

An obvious example of this is seen in the recurring nightmare of a young woman who felt a piece of cloth touch her face, and repeatedly woke her family with her screams. Her brother, tiring of this, one night woke her from her screams and made her talk about her feelings. His persistence gradually revealed that she associated the cloth with the burial shroud of her grandmother. This brought to the surface grief and feelings about death she had never allowed herself to feel before.

The nightmare never returned. See nightmares; dream processing. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Recurring Dreams

See Types of Dreams (Introduction.)... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Recurring Dreams

Recurring dreams can be highly useful and important to analyze. They happen for one of two reasons: (1) they reflect an unhealthy pattern that you have fallen into in real life, and they are trying to show you that your behaviour is not helping you be happy. Or, (2) they represent unresolved feelings, such as anger or sadness over a past situation that you have not healed from. In many recurring dreams, your sleeping self is trying to solve a problem - or confront an emotion - that you are unable to face in real life. Whatever the subject of your recurring dream is, you can be sure it is reflecting something in your current life situation, even if the dream takes you back in time. Use the Dream Dictionary to analyze the major symbols and events in your dream, to piece together its message. Think carefully about what in your life might be causing you continual stress or worry.... My Dream Interpretation

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My Dream Interpretation

Recurring Dreams

Repetitive dreams are a clear message from our dreaming mind that we are stuck in a particular mind set or behavioural cycle.

• If a dream continues to repeat itself, it is worth exploring it’s meaning as it needs your conscious understanding and action in order to resolve something in your emotional make-up.

• Recurring dreams can be a trauma relieving response to the original event that triggered them.... The Premier in Dream Dictionary

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The Premier in Dream Dictionary

Recurring Dreams

Recurring dreams often coincide with phases in your life and are particularly common when in transition from one life stage to another, or when you are forced to deal with a new and unknown situation. As such, they can be seen as signposts on your journey through life, providing signals about where you are heading and how you are feeling. By looking at the themes that feature in recurring dreams, you can then identify which part of your life is being indicated. Although some recurring dreams are associated with stress and trauma, when these dreams occur they offer a unique opportunity to understand what motivates you from the very deepest level. Some of the most common recurring dream themes that can occur at any life stage are as follows:... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

Recurring Nightmare

Nightmares often depict issues that threaten your emotional safety and wellbeing and you may find yourself dreaming of the same event, person, situation or setting over and over and over again. One theory holds that dreams with recurring themes may coincide with life stages or are an underlying response to the psychological stresses of events such as divorce or the loss of a loved one.

Women tend to report recurring dreams more than men. For example, the thing young children fear the most is abandonment, as without the love and protection of their parents or carers they would die. Later, as they begin to crawl, then walk, then run, they fear bodily harm. Some dream analysts believe that these two issues—fear of bodily harm and abandonment—recur again and again in a person’s life. A forty-year-old woman who discovers her husband has had an affair may, for example, dream of an earthquake and her inability to find a place of safety. This relates to fears of being abandoned.

Recurring nightmare dreams may be an indication that the dreaming mind is trying to present troublesome emotions or situations to a conscious mind that is somehow stuck in a habitual feeling state or response. The dream is encouraging the dreamer to find ways of resolving the trauma or difficulty underlying the dream.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

Recurring Object

If a specific object or objects appears and reappears in your dream, it tends to point out a valuable perspective or new approach towards a problem. Try to take note of the function of the object, what purpose it serves and in what kind of situation you would be likely to find it, as it can show how your response to a situation can be improved. For example, a set of embroidery needles may suggest you should pay more attention to detail, whereas a hammer would suggest you might profit from a direct, hard-hitting approach.... The Element Encyclopedia

Read More...

The Element Encyclopedia

Recurring Symbol

Symbols in dreams generally occur because they illustrate a quality or function, or because of the association you may have with them. So if particular symbols, such as a jungle setting, theme park or castle appear in your dream, this is because these particular images express something significant about the way you feel or because they offer you a key to understanding a particular challenge.

If a particular landscape or setting of a dream reoccurs, it tends to illustrate the way something affects you or how it makes you feel.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

What Does It Mean When You Have A Recurring Dream?

Recurrent dream themes often start at a young age, but can begin at any time, and persist for the rest of one’s life.

The theme of missing an exam, to take one example, commonly begins during college years, when the stress of performing well may be more intense than ever before. However, this theme may then carry forward as a recurring dream for many years, even as one moves on to a career.

The “missing the exam” dream may reappear the night before an important job interview or an evaluation at work.

The circumstances may change, but the same feelings of stress, and the desire to perform well, can trigger the relevant recurrent dream. Theorists suggest that these themes may be considered “scripts” (Spoormaker, 2008) or perhaps “complexes” (Freud 1950); as soon as your dream touches any aspect of the theme, the full script unfolds in completion. Dream theorists generally agree that recurring dreams are connected to unresolved problems in the life of the dreamer. In a previous post I discussed the idea that dreams often portray a Central Image, a powerful dream image that contextualizes a certain emotion or conflict for the dreamer.

The Tidal Wave dream is an example of a Central Image that represents overwhelming emotions such as helplessness and fear.

The Tidal Wave dream is a common dream to experience following trauma or abuse, and often becomes a recurrent theme that reflects a person’s struggling with integrating and accepting the trauma. Resolution of this theme over time is a good sign that the trauma has been confronted and adaptively integrated in the psyche. Empirical research has also supported findings that resolution of a recurrent dream is associated with improved well-being (Zadra, 1996). This is one way that keeping track of your dreams can be extremely informative and helpful in a therapeutic, or even self-help, process.


Many people have the same or a similar dream many times, over either a short period of time or their lifetime. Recurring dreams usually mean there is something in your life you’ve not acknowledged that is causing stress of some sort.

The dream repeats because you have not corrected the problem. Another theory is that people who experience recurring dreams have some sort of trauma in their past they are trying to deal with. In this case, the dreams tend to lessen with time. Nightmares are dreams that are so distressing they usually wake us up, at least partially. Nightmares can occur at any age but are seen in children with the most frequency. Nightmares usually cause strong feelings of fear, sadness or anxiety. Their causes are varied. Some medications cause nightmares (or cause them if you discontinue the medication abruptly). Traumatic events also cause nightmares. Treatment for recurring nightmares usually starts with interpreting what is going on in the dream and comparing that with what is happening in the person’s life. Then, the person undergoes counseling to address the problems that are presumably causing the nightmare. Some sleep centers offer nightmare therapy and counseling. Another method of treating nightmares is through lucid dreaming. Through lucid dreaming, the dreamer can confront his or her attacker and, in some cases, end the nightmares.... About Dream Interpretation

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About Dream Interpretation