outline

Dream Interpretation Outline | Dream Meanings


Spiritually, to be conscious of a line marking the perimeter of an object suggests that we are recognizing a duality – the existence of two things.

To be outlining an idea suggests that we have some basic concepts that are worth exploring.

Dream Meanings of Versatile | Versatile - Anonymous

Psychological / emotional perspective: An outline is usually a brief statement of intent, and with practice in dreams we are often able to formulate such a statement.

An outline document in dreams can symbolize this.

The problem is that when we wake up, unless we are used to recording our dreams, such a statement of intended action can be lost.

Dream Meanings of Versatile | Versatile - Anonymous

Material aspects: An outline in dreams is intended to give emphasis or to mark the edge of something. Under these circumstances we should consider our actions in waking life a little more carefully.

Dream Meanings of Versatile | Versatile - Anonymous


Outline | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Outline

Horseshoe

Well-known symbol for luck. Travel.

According to Freud, the outline of the horseshoe represents the opening of the female sex organ.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

Fall

1- A fall in a dream outlines the need to be grounded, to take care within a known situation. We may be harmed by being too pedestrian.

2- If we forget who we are or where we come from, we will surely fall.

3- Spiritual fear is symbolised here, particularly the Fall from Grace and its attendant consequences.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Blueprints

(see Schematics)

An outline of your goals and plans for the future.

The patterns of your life, the image shown being your conception of what you have built thus far, or that which you hope to build.

Directional guidance for knowing how to proceed with a specific project or concern. Look to the rest of the dream for details that delineate this further, like any symbol key that appears on the blueprints.... The Language of Dreams

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The Language of Dreams

Schematics

Seeing any type of plans or blueprints in your dream often reveals symbolic or literal representations of your future hopes, what you are currently working toward, cycles that have repeated themselves in your life, or the patterns of fate currently at work in your reality.

The need to develop a solid outline for your life, including obtainable goals, so that growth can begin or continue.... The Language of Dreams

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The Language of Dreams

Square

(see Four, Pictograpb)

Metaphorically, the inability to fit in due to social awkwardness (e.g., being “square”).

Trying to adapt to an impossible situation, like putting a square peg in a round bole.

Boundaries. Like the outlines in a coloring book, the lines of a square may contain something, or keep something out. Look to the rest of the dream for more information to see if this fits.

For example, if a house sits amid a high square fence, this probably shows that you’re very private and keep a strong wall between vourself and others.

If a square frame, highlighting a perspective.... The Language of Dreams

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The Language of Dreams

Fall / Falling

Material aspects: A fall in a dream outlines the need to be grounded, to take care within a known situation. We may be harmed by being too pedestrian.

To dream of falling shows a lack of confidence in our own ability. We may feel threatened by a lack of security, whether real or imagined. We fear being dropped by friends or colleagues.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

Spire

True love and friendship are the omens in a dream of a spire outlined against the sky.

However, if the spire was twisted or leaning, it is a sign that you will have some difficulties to overcome before you achieve your goal.... The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

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The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

Kitchen

As the nurturing center of a house, the kitchen represents the heart and hearth of the self.

It is where the family is fed and comes together in community.

It is the room where people tend to congregate during parties.

It is the symbolic realm of mother and the feminine principle as it is expressed by the family structure. Food is stored and prepared in the kitchen, so the symbolic food for your soul is located in the kitchen of your dreams. Consider how your dream may be informing you of how you are responding to your own spiritual cooking.

If your life experience of family, mother, and kitchen was different from the ideal in your dream, your personal focus must include your individual paradigm. For example, much of a family’s abusive interactions can occur in the kitchen, so such associations should be considered when interpreting a kitchen dream.

The activity in the dream will outline your current internal view around issues of nurturing, self-care, and healing. Any people who appear are key components in the process of exploration.

If they are known to you, use the character-aspect technique to integrate their qualities into your interpretation.

If there were people in the dream not known to you, consider whatever you can remember about them from the dream. Any dream that takes place primarily in a kitchen has the capacity to offer you an overview of the status of your heart center. Use it to examine whether you are experiencing healthy levels of self- nurturance or are in need of adjustments in this area.... Complete Dictionary of Dreams

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Complete Dictionary of Dreams

Lesbian Sex

This is symbolic of the integration of character aspects of the feminine principle. Any sexual act in a dream connects symbolically to the process of integration and the joining together of different aspects of the personality. In the case of lesbian sex, elements of the feminine principle such as nurturing, caretaking, and creativity are being highlighted. This symbol is included as a separate term, as it is not uncommon for heterosexual women to have dreams of lesbian sex when life events focus on this energy.

Dreaming of sex with another woman is often reported by women during pregnancy.

If the dreamer identifies as a lesbian, then such dreams should be explored through the concepts outlined in the terms Sex and Intercourse. Watching lesbian sex is a waking-life fantasy for many heterosexual men. However, this image has more to do with integration of inner aspects of the feminine principle for a man when such a dream appears.

It is a natural process of evolution for every man as he matures through life to become more in touch with his feminine nature.

A truly integrated man has access to his own creativity, receptivity, nurturing qualities, and sensitivity.... Complete Dictionary of Dreams

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Complete Dictionary of Dreams

Journeys Out Of The Body

Some of the earliest research into OBEs was conducted by Frenchman Yarm Louis Forham (1884-1917), who believed that everyone was capable of astral travel in a variety of guises, recording his observations in Practical Astral Travel. Forham claimed to have made astral visits to a woman he later married and to have experienced astral sex. Between 1902 and 1938, Englishman Oliver Fox took research into OBEs one step further when he claimed to have succeeded in inducing OBEs with lucid dreaming (see INTRODUCTION). He published his discoveries in 1920 in the journal English Occult Review and later in a book, Astral Projection. A fellow Englishman and OBE investigator, J. H. M. Whiteman claimed to have had thousands of OBEs, sometimes in the form of a woman or a child, between 1931 and 1953, which he described in The Mystical Life.

Robert A. Monroe (1915-1995), former television executive of Westchester County, New York, attracted widespread interest in OBEs from both the public and the scientific community when he published his account of OBEs in Journeys out of the Body (1971). His interest in OBEs had been triggered in 1958 when he began having spontaneous OBEs in his sleep. In his book, he described the experience as follows: "In 1958, without any apparent cause, I began to float out of my physical body.

It was not voluntary; I was not attempting any mental feats. It was not during sleep, so I couldn’t dismiss it as simply a dream. I had full, conscious awareness of what was happening, which of course only made it worse. I assumed it was some sort of hallucination caused by something dangerous—a brain tumor, or impending mental illness. Or imminent death. It occurred usually when I would lie down or relax for rest or preparatory to sleep—not every time but several times weekly. I would float up a few feet above my body before I became aware of what was happening. Terrified, I would struggle through the air and back into my physical body. Try as I might, I could not prevent it from recurring."

In his books, Monroe sets out an astonishing range of experience, some of which was unpleasant and involved meeting entities or thought forms that attacked him. He also described an overwhelmingly powerful energy: meeting the astral forms of other humans and sexual experiences on the astral level. He outlines his belief that there were various levels of existence in the OBE state. Locale I is earth, the here and now. Locale II is the infinite astral plane where everyone goes to sleep and dreams, and where countless entities exist. <p>Locale III transcends space and time and is a parallel universe. In his writings, Monroe described a technique for triggering out-of-body states and here is a brief description of it:

  • First lie down in a darkened room in a relaxing position.
  • Loosen your clothing and remove all jewelry.
  • Enter a very relaxed state and consciously tell yourself that you will remember everything that happens to you.
  • Begin breathing through your half open mouth.
  • Concentrate on an object.
  • When other images start to enter your mind, just passively watch them.
  • Try to clear your mind and observe your field of vision through your closed eyes.
  • Do nothing more for a while.
  • Simply look through your closed eyelids at the blackness in front of you.
  • After a while, you may notice light patterns.
  • When these cease, you will enter a state of such relaxation that you lose all awareness of the body.
  • You are almost in the state where your only source of stimulation will be your own thoughts.
  • It is in this relaxed and refreshed condition that out-of-body journeys are triggered.
  • To leave your body, think of yourself getting lighter and of how nice it would be to float upwards.
  • With sufficient practice, Monroe claims that a wide variety of experiences can occur.

If Monroe’s theories are correct, the implications for dream interpretation would be enormous. Even though surveys suggest that one quarter of the population believes they have had an OBE, recent research on OBEs has been inconclusive. This may be because OBEs vary from individual to individual. Laboratory tests have been equally inconclusive, even with individuals who claim to be able to project out of body at will. Tests with animals have been a little more promising, with kittens showing a change in behavior during out-of-body efforts to comfort them; skeptics, however, argue that this was achieved through telepathy or clairvoyance. Although OBE’s cannot be disproved, to date there has been no solid evidence that anyone has actually left their body during sleep or while dreaming.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

Near-death Experience

A near-death experience (NDE) is a phenomenon reported by people who have been declared clinically dead by medical experts, or passed close to death through accident or illness, but are later revived. They report an altered state of consciousness in which they feel they are traveling through a tunnel towards a warm and bright light or they are floating above their body watching medical efforts to revive them.

Intriguingly, near-death reports from different cultures around the world are generally consistent and in many instances are identical to the features of the post-mortem state that is described in the Tibetan Book of the Dead. There is also a marked similarity between NDEs and reports of the inner journeys of shamanism, astral travel and out-of- body experiences.

The term ‘near-death experience’ was coined by American doctor Raymond Moody in the 1970s to describe the phenomenon outlined above. Prior to publication of Moody’s book, Life After Life in 1975, NDEs were not openly talked about; once the book came out, more and more people began to talk about them. By 1982 a Gallup poll suggested that as many as eight million Americans had had some kind of NDE. Moody and a number of other NDE researchers, such as Kenneth Ring, a psychologist and founding member of the International Association of Near Death Studies at the University of Connecticut, were able to identify a number of traits common to all NDEs, even though the experience was always unique to each individual. They concluded that in a NDE, people typically experience one or more of the following phenomena in this sequence: a sense of leaving the material world behind or an out-of-body experience in which they feel they are floating above their bodies looking down; cessation of pain, a feeling of great calm and peace; traveling down a dark tunnel towards a light at its end; meeting spirit beings, many of whom are dead friends and relatives; meeting a spirit guide who takes them through their life story and puts their life into perspective without any negative judgment; and, finally, an abrupt and sometimes reluctant return to life.

The great majority of NDEs are described as being positive and uplifting; around three per cent are described as negative or frightening. Almost anyone can have the experience and it is not limited to those who have religious beliefs, although many people who have experienced a NDE do become more religious or develop a spiritual belief system afterwards. Almost all say they lose their fear of death, this being replaced by a strong belief in an afterlife. Many discover a meaning and purpose to their lives that they may have previously lacked. In some cases, the NDE leaves a person with heightened intuitive or psychic powers.

Even though millions of people claim to have had an NDE, it is impossible for researchers to prove scientifically that the experience is genuine. Evidence is therefore based entirely on anecdotal reports.

According to skeptics, the NDE is a dream or hallucination caused by, amongst other things, a lack of oxygen, the release of the body’s natural pain killers called endorphins and increased levels of carbon dioxide as the brain dies. NDEs were reportedly reproduced by Ronald Siegel, a researcher at the University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine, when LSD and other drugs were administered. NDE supporters stress, however, that drug-induced hallucinations and NDEs are totally different things. Such explanations also do not take into account the fact that many people brought back to life can give accurate accounts of their resuscitations, of medical procedures carried out on them or report conversations they overheard at the time they were allegedly dead. This suggests that some part of consciousness can separate from the body at death. There is no doubt that the near-death experiences are supported by impressive documentation and, for believers in them, these reports constitute a very powerful argument for the existence of an afterlife.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

What Are Dreams For?

“Trust in dreams, for in them the gateway to eternity is hidden.”
KHALIL GIBRAN

Dreams and their purpose
Consider dreams like home movies that each person produces in response to their daily experiences. These movies are meant to clarify certain situations and support the person. With sufficient knowledge, they can become a sort of spiritual guide, since oneiric thoughts are a window to the subconscious where, frequently, hidden feelings and repressed needs are stored without us realizing.

Even then, there are people who question the importance of dreams. Some scientists, for example, believe that the content of dreams is simply a random mix of the many electronic signals the brain receives. Others, however, find all types of messages in even the simplest dreams, and end up distancing themselves from daily reality in favor of oneiric activity.

Neither extreme is advisable. Each dream is undoubtedly a journey into the unknown, but, at the same time, modern psychology has allowed us to understand a good part of their structure. One of the conclusions drawn from the study of dreams confirms this: dreams can be a priceless aid to the imagination, but above all when it comes to solving problems. You just have to know how to listen to them, because their content tends to have a direct relation to the emotional challenges you are experiencing.

Each dream is a journey to the unknown with an implicit personal message. Although it is the content of the episode that determines our emotional state, dreaming in black and white indicates a possible lack of enthusiasm or nostalgia for the past. These dreams are an invitation to live with more intensity and enjoy the present.

Still from the film Viaje a la Luna (Méliès, 1902).

It is known that in times of crisis, our oneiric production increases significantly, both in quantity and intensity. Should we consider this “surplus” to be positive? Yes, as long as one makes an effort to remember and interpret the dreams, since, as we will see further on, they have a valuable therapeutic potential.

For example, if a couple is going through a critical phase, remembering and analyzing usually helps them understand the subconscious reactions they have to the situation. In other words, dreams are an excellent tool to get to the bottom of emotional conflicts. Knowing the causes is an essential step to resolving the problems, regardless of what course you take.

The English psychologist David Fontana, whose books have been translated into more than twenty languages, said it clearly: “In listening to my patients’ dreams in therapy sessions, I have observed how, often, these can take us right to the root of the psychologic problem much quicker than other methods.” Although, we shouldn’t fool ourselves: dreams are a mystery that can rarely decipher everything. But if a certain level of interpretation helps us understand ourselves better, what more can we ask for? From a practical point of view, our own oneiric material can be very useful.

In dreams, relationships with others are a recurring theme. The people that appear in our dreams, especially strangers, represent facets of ourselves that the subconscious is showing us.

Well-known writers such as Robert Louis Stevenson, William Blake, Edgar Allan Poe, and Woody Allen have had faith in this, acknowledging that part of their works have been inspired by dreams. The discoveries of Albert Einstein or Niels Bohr (father of modern atomic physics), among other celebrated scientists, had the same origin. In any case, these examples shouldn’t confuse us: no dream can tell you what path to follow through symbolic images without the intellect to decipher them.

Prosperity, precognition, and pronostics
What’s more, judging by some documented cases, we can even reap material gain from dreams. There is proof of some people that had premonitory dreams managing to earn significant sums of money thanks to their oneiric “magic.” The most spectacular case was in the fifties, when an Englishman named Harold Horwood won a considerable number of prizes betting on horses. His dreams transmitted clues as to the winning racehorse to bet on. Unfortunately, these types of premonitions don’t come to everyone. However, anyone has the opportunity to discover the greatest treasure of all—knowledge of one’s self—through their dreams.

We’ve all experienced the feeling of having lost control of our lives at some point. We might feel like others are deciding things for us or that we are victims of our circumstances.

Our “dream-scapes” contain valuable information about our desires and concerns; they could also function as a forecast of some aspect of our future. According to ancient tradition, dreaming of stars predicts prosperity and spiritual wealth. “Starry Night” (Van Gogh, 1889).

However, many psychologists disagree with this. That is, they argue that daily events are not coincidences but rather meaningful deeds that reflect the inner state of the individual.

Dreams and thoughts
According to these experts, luck is a pipe dream, something that does not exist, since that which we consider the result of coincidence is none other than the natural manifestation of our thoughts and attitudes. We are basically creator, not passive receivers or victims of the events that unravel in our lives.

An example that illustrates this idea perfectly is the story of the old man who threw rocks into the sea. One day, someone asked if he ever got bored of the simple game. The old pebble thrower stared at his questioner and gave an answer he’d never forget: “My small stones are more important than they seem, they provoke repercussions. They will help create waves that, sooner or later, will reach other other side of the ocean.”

What does this have to do with dreams? It’s simple: as we’ve just seen, we are the only ones responsible for our daily experiences, no matter how hard that is to believe. Therefore it shouldn’t be too difficult to take control of our lives; we just have to listen to the messages in our interior, that is, our oneiric thoughts, of which we are ultimately the authors.

Visualizations
In this way, thanks to dreams, our two existences—conscious and unconscious—can work together to make our lives more creative and free. An important part of this process is getting to know and understanding better the process of thought. One of the most beautiful and commonly used visualizations in yoga reminds us of this: “In the bottom of the lake of our thoughts is a jewel. In order for it to shine in the light of the sun (the divine), the water (the thoughts) must be pure and crystal clear and calm, free of waves (excitement). If our water is murky or choppy, others can’t see this jewel, our inner light...”

In the bottom of the lake of our thoughts is a jewel...

But it’s not that simple: it’s often difficult to discern the connection that unites wakefulness with sleep, between what we think ourselves to be and what our oneiric fantasies say about us. In any case, if our search is passionate and patient, constant and conscious, it will result in the discovery of our true Self. Therefore the interpretation of dreams cuts right to the heart of the message conceived by and for ourselves (although not consciously). It is important to learn to listen to them (further on we will discuss techniques for this) when it comes time to unstitch their meaning and extract the teachings that can enrich our lives.

The rooms in our dreams reflect unknown aspects of our personality.

In this way, when we have to make an important decision, we can clear up any doubts through a clear understanding of our most intimate desires. Although it may seem like common sense, this is not that common these days, since most people make decisions at random, out of habit, or by impulse.

The meaning and psychic effect of some deities in Tibetan Buddhism can be linked to the monsters that are so popular today.

Dreams allow creativity a free rein and free us from worry, sometimes resulting in surreal images that would be impossible in waking life.

Put simply, the idea is to find your true identity and recognize your wounds, fears, and joys through dreams. Never forget that the subconscious, although hidden, is an essential part of our personality. Dreams are fundamental for understanding the Self, since they are a direct path to this little-known part of ourselves. Their symbolic content allows us to recover repressed emotions and gives us a map to the relationships that surround us.

Nightmares that put us to the test
Sometimes the messages they bring us are not so pleasant and take the form of nightmares. However, although it may be hard to accept, these nightmares are valuable warnings that some aspects of our life are not

in harmony with our deepest Self and thus need our prompt intervention. Nightmares are proof that self discovery is not always pleasant. Sometimes it’s necessary to feel this pain in order to find out what you really are and need.

On the other hand, dreams give creativity a free rein because, when we sleep, we are free from our day-to-day worries. Therefore, even if you don’t consider yourself a creative person, keep in mind that all the scenes, symbols, and characters that appear in your dreams have been created solely and exclusively by you.

It’s often very helpful to record dreams in a notebook (we will explain how further on) in order to later analyze them and apply their teachings to daily life.

It is quite the paradox; the human being awakens their most intimate reality precisely when they are sleeping.

Carl Gustav Jung, who dedicated his life to studying dreams, developed this metaphor: “People live in mansions of which they only know the basements.” Only when our conscience is sleeping do we manage to unveil some of the rooms of our magnificent house: rooms that may be dusty and inhospitable and fill us with terror and anxiety, or magnificent rooms where we want to stay forever.

Given that they all belong to us, it is reasonable to want to discover them all. Dreams, in this sense, are a fundamental tool.

How to remember dreams
At this point, you’re probably thinking, “Sure, dreams are really important, but I can’t use them because I simply don’t remember them.” That’s not a problem, there are techniques you can use to strengthen your memory of oneiric thoughts. Techniques that, when applied correctly, allow us to remember dreams surprisingly well.

The use of these methods is indispensable in most cases since people tend to forget dreams completely when they wake up. Why? Because, according to the hypothesis of Sigmund Freud, we have a sort of internal censor that tries to prevent our oneiric activity from becoming conscious material.

Sometimes the message of dreams turns unpleasant and takes the form of a nightmare...

However, we can laugh in the face of this censor with a few tricks. The most drastic is to wake up suddenly when the deepest sleep phase (REM phase) is just about to end, so that you can rapidly write all the details of your mind’s theater in your notebook. Waking suddenly will take this censor by surprise, stopping it from doing its job. The best time to set the alarm is for four, five, six, or a little more than seven hours after going to sleep.

If your level of motivation is not high enough to get up in the middle of the night and record your dreams, there are alternatives that let you sleep for a stretch and then remember what you dream with great precision.

First of all, it’s helpful to develop some habits before going to bed, such as waiting a few hours between dinner and going to sleep. Experts recommend avoiding foods that cause gas (legumes like green beans, raw vegetables, etc.) and foods high in fat.

You must also keep in mind that, like tea and coffee, tobacco and alcohol alter the sleep cycle and deprive the body of a deep sleep (the damaging effects of a few glasses on the body does not disappear for about four hours).

What is recommended is to drink water or juice, or eat a yogurt, more than two hours after eating, before going to bed. There are two main reasons for this: liquids facilitate a certain purification of the body, and because, most interestingly for our purposes, it causes us to get up in the middle of the night. As we said, this will catch the internal censor by surprise and allow us to record our dreams easily.

Relaxing in bed and going over the events of the day helps free the mind and foster oneiric creativity.

Yoga exercises, such as the savasana pose, are great for relaxation, restful sleep, and a positive outlook.

Relaxation
It’s important to surround yourself with an environment that stimulates oneiric activity. You should feel comfortable in your room and your bed. The fewer clothes you wear to sleep, the better. Practicing relaxation techniques, listening to calming music, or taking a warm bath a few minutes before getting into bed will help relieve stress so that you enjoy a deep restorative sleep.

There are good books on relaxation on the market, both autogenous and yogic; we recommend one of the most practical, Relajacion para gente muy ocupada (Relaxation for Busy People), by Shia Green, published by this same publishing house. However, the real key is to concentrate on remembering dreams. When you go to bed, go over the events of the day that were important to you. This way, you will increase the probability of dreaming about the subjects that most interest or worry you.

So, let’s suppose you’re asleep now. What should you do to remember dreams? First, try to wake up naturally, without external stimuli. If this isn’t possible, use the quietest possible alarm without radio. Once awake, stay in bed for a few moments with your eyes closed and try to hold your dreams in your memory as you gently transition into wakefulness. Take advantage of this time to memorize the images you dreamt. The final oneiric period is usually the longest and these instants are when it is most possible to remember dreams.

Remember that it’s best to write the keywords of the dream immediately upon waking. It is convenient to keep a notebook on the nightstand and reconstruct the dream during the day.

The dream notebook
Next, write in the notebook (that you have left beside your bed) whatever your mind has been able to retain, no matter how absurd or trivial your dreams seem, even if you only remember small fragments. This is not the moment to make evaluations or interpretations. The exercise is to simply record everything that crosses your mind with as much detail as possible. Giving the fragility of memory, it’s okay to start off with just a few key words that summarize the content of the dream. These words will help you reconstruct the dream later in the day if you don’t have enough time in the morning. Ideally this notebook will gradually become a diary or schedule that allows you to study, analyze, and compare a series of dreams. Through a series of recorded episodes, you can detect recurring characters, situations, or themes. This is something that’s easy to miss at first glance. One important detail: specialists recommend you date and title each dream, since this helps you remember them in later readings.

It’s also interesting to complement your entries with relevant annotations: what feelings were provoked, which aspects most drew your attention, which colors predominated, etc. An outline or drawing of the most significant images can also help you unravel the meaning. Finally, you should write an initial personal interpretation of the dream. For that, the second part of this book offers some useful guidelines.

While we dream, there is a sort of safety mechanism that inhibits our movement. Therefore, sleepwalkers don’t walk during the REM phase. This protects us from acting out the movements of our dreams and possibly hurting ourselves. Still from the Spanish movie Carne de fieras (Flesh of beasts) (1936).

As we’ve seen, there are a series of techniques to remember dreams. This is the first step to extracting their wisdom. Now, given that oneiric thoughts are a source of inspiration for solving problems, wouldn’t it be great to choose what you dream about before you go to sleep? Rather than waiting for dreams to come to us spontaneously, try to make them focus on the aspects of your life that interest you.

How to determine the theme of dreams
Let’s imagine that someone is not very satisfied with their job. They’d like to get into another line of work but are afraid of losing the job security they enjoy. On one hand, they’re not so young anymore, they should take the risk to get what they really want. But they don’t know what to do. They need a light, a sign, an inspiration. In short, they need a dream. But not just any dream, a dream that really centers on their problem and gives answers.

However, if you limit yourself to just “consulting your pillow,” you won’t get the desired results. There is a possibility you will be lucky and dream about what you’re interested in, but more likely you will dream of anything but. If we are really prepared to dive into that which worries us most intimately, we can direct our dreams to give us concrete answers. Just like the techniques to remember dreams, the process is simple: before sleeping, we must concentrate on the subject of interest.

It’s also best to write in your notebook all the events and emotions of the day that were most important before you go to sleep.

Once your impressions and theme to dream have been noted, concentrate on the subject that most bothers you. Think about it carefully; propose questions and alternatives, “listen” to your own emotions. It’s best if all possible doubts are noted in the dream notebook. This way you’re more likely to receive an answer.

In order for it to be an effective answer, the question must be well defined. The fundamental idea of the problem should be summed up in a single phrase. Once you’ve reflected on the problem, it’s time to go to bed. But the “homework” is not finished yet. Before going to sleep, you need to concentrate on the concrete question. You need to forget everything else, even the details. Just “visualize” and repeat the question, without thinking of anything else, until you fall asleep.

Oneiric thoughts are a source of inspiration. Annotating and analyzing them carefully fosters a process of self discovery.


Writing a dream notebook
You should always have a notebook and pen near your bed to write down dreams the moment you wake up. Don’t forget to always write the date. What details should you include in this kind of diary? As many as you remember, the more the better.

  • Note the events of the dream in order. It may not seem important when they appear unrelated. However, when analyzing them you can establish a chronological relationship between distinct elements.
  • What characters appear in your dreams? Was someone important missing? If one of them reminded you of someone you know, note that. Don’t rely on your memory.
  • If a familiar sight appears, analyze the differences between the dream and the real world. Were the doors/windows in the same place? Were they the same size and color? And so on. This is especially important if you want to practice lucid dreaming.
  • Also note the differences between familiar people in dreams and how
  • Also note the differences between familiar people in dreams and how they are in real life.
  • List the non-human characters that appeared, as well as any objects that behaved as if animated.
  • Take special note of recurrent themes, scenes, or characters. Do they always act/happen the same way?
  • Write down all the colors you remember.
  • Note your emotional reactions: if you feel happy, scared, nervous... Don’t let any theories about the meaning of dreams interfere. You run the risk of skipping details that might be very significant.
  • Finally, don’t trust your memory. After a time, you won’t remember a thing about some of the dreams you wrote down. No matter how clear they are in the moment, write them down.

Dreams are “signs,” messages from our subconscious, and the study and interpretation of them helps resolve the problems that worry us.

Nocturnal sleep puts us in touch with the deepest level of being, which allows us to approach our problems with a wider perspective. And induced dreams tend to be easier to remember than other oneiric activity.

When we dream, we enter a marvelous world that escapes the laws of spatial and temporal logic.... Dreampedia

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Dreampedia

Dreams In Arabic Culture

Dreams have many meanings in Arabic culture. According to some, sleep is a preoccupation of the soul, which detaches itself from external things and experiences events taking place in its interior. During sleep the interior self “absorbs” the five senses, which then cease to perceive and turn back to the mind. According to other views, the soul can perceive the form of things by the senses and by thought, independently of their objective reality. Thought does not fall asleep when the faculty of perceiving sleeps, and during the night images continue to exist as if they could be sensed. Their form is outlined in the soul, and they are presented to the mind of the dreamer in the same way as in the waking state.

It is believed that the soul, when it is freed from the physical limits of the body, can float at ease over everything that it desires to possess, whereas in the waking state it cannot. When dreamers awaken, they still preserve the memory of these fantastic pictures. If the dreamer has a blemished soul, the dreamer is continually deluded by dreams, whereas the dreamer is unde- ceived when the soul is pure.

Traditional Arab belief also holds that dreams are generated by the fundamental humors of the human body, and that individuals dream accord- ing to their temperaments. Certain Arabs com- pletely separate the faculty of perception from the visible body and believe that individuals, when asleep, can leave their bodies and contem- plate the world with a lucidity proportional to their purity, a notion supported by various verses of the Qur’an. ... The Dream Encyclopedia

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The Dream Encyclopedia