Dream Interpretation Natives | Dream Meanings


1- Any dream which contains ‘natives’ that is. people from another culture and possibly with a tribal system is making us aware of a very simple structure to life. Our natural feelings can come to the fore in a way that expresses our wilder, rather less civilised selves.

2- Within man, however civilised he may be, there is a part which holds to a basic simplicity. Native culture is perhaps in some ways more free and less restricted than Western culture. It therefore allows for not only an easier expression of emotions on a personal level, but also a structured management of power both in a tribal and spiritual sense.

It is understood, for instance, that only those who have been trained can become witch-doctors and can deal with the spirits. Everyone is aware of his or her task.

It is this aspect which may be relevant in dreams about natives.

3- In the spiritual sense, natives represent a closeness to the earth and to nature something we need if we are to understand our own spirituality.

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary | Pamela Ball

Natural feelings; being uncivilised. See aborigine; black person.

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences | Tony Crisp


Natives | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Natives

Conscription

(Call-up; Draft; Enlist; Military service; Mobilization) A military draft in a dream means cognizance of what is good and beneficial for everyone and shows equality between the natives of the land, the poor and the rich, the close relative, the distinguished and the unknown.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Aboriginal

The pan of self which still has contact with the natural life processes within, and feels unified with, the rest of nature and the cosmos. See African; black person; natives. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Creativity And Problem Solving In Dreams

Few dreams are, by themselves, problem solving or creative.

The few excep­tions are usually very clear. Example: ‘My mother-in-law died of cancer. I had watched the whole progression of her illness, and was very upset by her death. Shortly after she died the relatives gathered and began to sort through her belongings to share them out. That was the climax of my upset and distress, and I didn’t want any part of this sorting and taking her things. That night I dreamt I was in a room with all the relatives. They were sorting her things, and I felt my waking distress. Then my mother-in-law came into the room. She was very real and seemed happy. She said for me not to be upset as she didn’t at all mind her relatives taking her things. When I woke from the dream all the anxiety and upset had disap­peared. It never returned (told to author dunng a talk given to the Housewives Register in Ilfracombe).

Although in any collection of dreams such clearcut prob­lem solving is fairly rare, nevertheless the basic function in dreams appears to be problem solving.

The proof of this lies in research done in dream withdrawal. As explained in the entry science, sleep and dreams, subjects are woken up as they begin to dream, therefore denying them dreams. This quickly leads to disorientation and breakdown of normal functioning, showing that a lot of problem solving occurs in dreams, even though it may not be as obvious as in the exam­ple. This feature of dreaming can be enhanced to a marked degree by processing dreams and arriving at insights into the information they contain. This enables old problems to be cleared up and new information and attitudes to be brought into use more quickly. Through such active work one be­comes aware of the self, which Carl Jung describes as a cen­tre, but which we might think of as a synthesis of all our experience and being. Gaining insight and allowing the self entrance into our waking affairs, as M L. Von Franz says in Man and His Symbols, gradually produces a wider and more mature personality’ which emerges, and by degrees becomes effective and even visible to others’.

The function of dreams may well be described as an effort on the part of our life process to support, augment and help mature waking consciousness.

A study of dreams suggests that the creative forces which are behind the growth of our body are also inextricably connected with psychological develop­ment. In fact, when the process of physical growth stops, the psychological growth continues.

If this is thwarted in any way, it leads to frustration, physical tension and psychosomatic and eventually physical illness.

The integration of experience.

which dreams are always attempting, if successful cannot help but lead to personal growth. But it is often frozen by the individual avoiding the growing pains’, or the discomfon of breaking through old concepts and beliefs.

Where there is any attempt on the pan of our conscious personality to co-operate with this, the creative aspect of dreaming emerges. In fact anything we are deeply involved in, challenged by or attempting, we will dream about in a creative way. Not only have communities like the American Indians used dreams in this manner—to find better hunting, solve community problems, find a sense of personal life direction— but scientists, writers, designers and thousands of lay people have found very real information in dreams After all, through dreams we have personal use of the greatest computer ever produced in the history of the world—the human brain.

1- In Genesis 41, the story of Pharaoh’s dream is told—the seven fat cows and the seven thin cows. This dream was creative in that, with Joseph’s interpretation, it resolved a national problem where famine followed years of plenty. It may very well be an example of gathered information on the history of Egypt being in the mind of Pharaoh, and the dream putting it together in a problem solving way. See dream process as computer.

2- William Blake dreamt his dead brother showed him a new way of engraving copper. Blake used the method success­fully.

3- Otto Leowi dreamt of how to prove that nervous impulses were chemical rather than electncal. This led to his Nobel prize.

4- Friedrich Kekule tned for years to define the structure of benzene. He dreamt of a snake with its tail in its mouth, and woke to realise this explained the molecular forma­tion of the benzene ring. He was so impressed he urged colleagues, ‘Gentlemen, leam to dream.’

5- Hilprecht had an amazing dream of the connection be­tween two pieces of agate which enabled him to translate an ancient Babylonian inscription.

6- Elias Howe faced the problem of how to produce an effec­tive sewing machine.

The major difficulty was the needle. He dreamt of natives shaking spears with holes in their points. This led to the invention of the Singer sewing ma­chine.

7- Robert Louis Stevenson claims to have dreamt the plot of many of his stories.

8- Albert Einstein said that during adolescence he dreamt he was riding a sledge. It went faster and faster until it reached the speed of light.

The stars began to change into amazing patterns and colours, dazzling and beautiful. His meditation on that dream throughout the years led to the theory of relativity.

To approach our dreams in order to discover their creativity, first decide what problematic or creative aspect of your life needs ‘dream power’. Define what you have already leamt or know about the problem. Write it down, and from this clarify what it is you want more insight into.

If this breaks down into several issues, choose one at a time. Think about the issue and pursue it as much as you can while awake. Read about it, ask people’s opinions, gather information. This is all data for the dream process.

If the question still needs further insight, be­fore going to sleep imagine you are putting the question to your internal store of wisdom, computer, power centre, or whatever image feels right.

For some people an old being who is neither exclusively man nor woman is a working image.

In the morning note down whatever dream you remember. It does not matter if the dream does not appear to deal with the question; Elias Howe’s native spears were an outlandish image, but nevertheless contained the information he needed. Investigate the dream using the techniques given in the entry dream processing. Some problems take time to define, so use the process until there is a resolution.

If it is a major problem, it may take a year or so; after all, some resolutions need re­structuring of the personality, because the problem cannot disappear while we still have the same attitudes and fears. See secret of the universe dreams; dream processing. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Failure

Example: I was in a race riding a horse but couldn’t get to the staning gate in time.

The others were way ahead of me jumping the fences. I couldn’t catch up, and one fence I came to grew to a huge height and was like a steel barrier. I couldn’t get over it and felt a failure’ (Ron S). Ron had not done well at school, had not taken any particular training, had no steady relationship or children. In his late 20s, Ron looked at his friends, married with families and steady jobs, and felt a failure. From the dream he realised he was viewing life as a competitive race to succeed. This was stopping him from fol­lowing his real interest, psychotherapy, which his family viewed as playing games. He could ride his horse into the fields and explore. He did, by going to Amenca, training, raising a family.

In general, failure indicates comparison; competitiveness; it sometimes depicts alternatives—failure is the alternative to success. So the failure might be ‘because’. See Is there a be­cause factor in the dream? in dream processing; falling. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Spear

According to Freud, phallic symbol. Aggression, being focused, and having success. Elias Howe in the middle of the last century had a very important dream about spears. He was captured by natives who pressured him to invent a sewing machine.

The tip of the spears they brandished in front of his face had holes. This dream gave him the idea for the double-stitch sewing machine.

Symbolically speaking, this dream refers to the feminine and masculine side of the dreamer, presented here by the image of the needle or the specialized spear.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

Bigamy

1- To dream of being a bigamist indicates not being able to decide cither between two loves or two courses of action. We arc being presented with two alternatives both of which have equal validity.

2- When we dream we are married to a bigamist we need to be aware that we are being two-timed or deceived by someone very close to us.

3- Spiritually bigamy can represent the choices one has to make, possibly between right and wrong. By association it may represent the astrological sign of Gemini.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Failure

1- Failure in a dream may not necessarily be personal. If, for instance, lights fail or refuse to work, we may need to be aware of a lack of energy or power. Personal failure can indicate a degree of competitiveness or can offer alternatives in the way we need to act.

2- The fear of failure is an almost universal fear, and to dream of failure may give us the opportunity to face that fear in an acceptable way.

3- Depression or spiritual frustration.

The failure we may feel at the hands of a greater power.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Mountain

In dream sequences the mountain usually appears in order to svmbolise an obstacle which needs to be overcome. By daring to climb the mountain we challenge our own inadequacies and free ourselves from fear.

To reach the top is to achieve one’s goal.

To fall down the mountain indicates carelessness.

We all have difficulties to face in life. Often it is how we face those difficulties that is important.

The symbol of the mountain offers many alternatives and choices. This means we can work out. through dreams, our best course of action in everyday life.

Representing the centre of our existence in earthly terms, the mountain is an image that can be worked on over and over again.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Apartments

(see Buildings, Castle)

Compartmentalization. Each door here represents a different aspect of self and your experiences.

Alternatives. Every door is another option waiting for examination.

Being lost in an apartment complex symbolizes having too many options from which to choose, and finding yourself overwhelmed by those options. Narrow down the field a little, then reapproach this situation.... The Language of Dreams

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The Language of Dreams

Wandering

(see Foot, Highway. Journey. Path. Travel)

Aimless thought patterns that cause problems with maintaining your focus on a current project or goal.

Lacking direction in life, not knowing exactly which path to take, or what choice to make in order to succeed in your objectives.

Introspection and exploration of the various alternatives currently available. Take care, however, that you don’t wander so far off as to lose sight of the primary- purpose.

ilms. Through arc, however, .is -erring.... The Language of Dreams

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The Language of Dreams

Corner

To dream that you are in a corner indicates that you feel unable to manage the different aspects of your life. You are confused and unsure of what to do next. Perhaps you feel as if you have no options or alternatives.... Dream Symbols and Analysis

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Dream Symbols and Analysis

Pizza

To dream of pizza stands for abundance, alternatives, and variety. It may also suggest a prevailing feeling of deprivation over something you wish to possess or accomplish.... Dream Symbols and Analysis

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Dream Symbols and Analysis

Zulu

To see Zulu natives surrounding you in a dream is a sign of release from a danger that has threatened your health and happiness.... Mystic Dream Book

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Mystic Dream Book

Bigamy

Material aspects: To dream of being a bigamist indicates not being able to decide either between two loves, two courses of action or two loyalties. We are being presented with alternatives, both of which have equal validity.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

Choice / Choose

Choice in dreams suggests that we must weigh up two alternatives – right or wrong, spiritual or material, good or bad, individual or community.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

Discrimination

Material aspects: The need to discriminate and take the best option often comes up on a day-to-day basis. We often have to compare and contrast our alternatives. This reflects in dreams perhaps more vividly than in real life and allows us to discriminate in our choices.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

Mountain

Psychological / emotional perspective: We all have difficulties to face in life. Often it is how we face those difficulties that is important.

The symbol of the mountain offers many alternatives and choices, such as whether to choose the apparently easier route or the more difficult. This means we can work out, through dreams, our best course of action in everyday life.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

Exits

Solutions or alternatives.... Expansions Dream Dictionary

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Expansions Dream Dictionary

Eskimo

Eskimos forecast financial difficulties which can be overcome by ordinary methods of retrenchment, but if you dreamed of these natives of the frozen north, you can forget about help from friends or relatives and get a tight grip on your spending.... The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

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The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

Animal(s)

(see also entries for particular animals; e.g. Bear, Cat)

(1) Parents may appear in dreams in the guise of animals. The animal will then usually be a focus for the dreamer’s ambivalent - love-hate - feelings towards the parent. For example, a spider or a cat may signify the threatening aspect of a mother from whose influence you need to liberate yourself.

Two of Freud’s most famous patients had animal phobias, as did a patient of Sandor Ferenczi (a member of Freud’s inner circle). One dreamed of white wolves in the branches of a walnut tree outside his bedroom window and the other had strong ambivalent feelings (fear and attraction) towards horses; the third was obsessed with poultry. Freud concluded that in all three cases the animals were father surrogates: in each case the person’s feelings for his father had been displaced on to animals.

(2) Animals may represent other people, besides parents. What you associate with the particular animal - slyness or aggressiveness or whatever — may be a characteristic of the particular person; the way you react to the animal in the dream may express your (perhaps unconscious) feelings towards the person.

(3) Animals in dreams may be symbolic of some primitive - ‘animal’, or even ‘beasdy5 - part of your psyche: some instinctive urge, for example. Thus, if in the dream your emotional response to the animal is one of fear, this would seem to indicate a fear of the instinctive urge (which, because of the fear, has been repressed).

If the animal has a threatening appearance, it may be a symbol of the danger that threatens the peace of the psyche when some part of it is neglected and confined to the ‘cellar’ - the depths of the unconscious - and not allowed proper expression at the conscious level. This situation may also be symbolized by the figure of a caged or wounded animal: we sometimes control our instincts too tightly or even maltreat them, and, just as animals are never more fierce or dangerous than when wounded, so it is with our Svounded’ instincts.

A view well worth considering is that we cannot - without detriment to ourselves - dispense with our animal nature, any more than with our ‘higher’ or ‘spiritual’ nature. The way to achieve peace and happiness is to allow both these sides of our nature to develop and find fulfilment in and through each other, in a symbiosis in which body and spirit, instead of going their separate ways, cooperate with mutual respect, each supplying means for the other’s fulfilment.

(4) A threatening or ferocious animal may represent aggression or anger buried in the unconscious.

If you think this may be so in your case (perhaps because you are prone to irrational, disproportionate outbursts of rage), look for the origins of the aggression. It may go back to early childhood: a child’s desire for a parent and its consequent jealousy and resentment towards the other parent may result in feelings of guilt, which in turn give rise to a desire to punish oneself. This aggressiveness directed against oneself (i.e. masochism) may then spill over into aggressiveness or rancour towards other people (i.e. sadism), especially loved ones or people closely related. Typically, an unresolved Oedipus complex (the ambivalent, love-hate feelings of an infant towards a parent) may display itself in later life in a similar ambivalence towards a spouse - an inability to love someone without simultaneously wanting to punish him or her.

Contradictory feelings towards others are a sign of inner conflict, usually a conflict between desire and conscience. And what we call conscience may be a morbid censoring and prohibiting mechanism set in motion by a childhood fear of punishment. This needs to be distinguished from a healthy conscience, which consists of all those moral guidelines we give ourselves by rational reflection. Some compromise between desires and the need to survive and succeed socially is almost inevitable; but a reasonably negotiated compromise is far preferable to the potentially dangerous inner tension that results from submitting to irrational phobias posing as the moral law.

(5) A tamed animal, or the act of taming an animal, may symbolize (the need for) that kind of controlled expression of instinct that is appropriate for living as a part of civilized society or for feeling that you are ‘king of the castle’ - that is, in control of your own actions.

(6) The wolf in the Little Red Riding Hood story exemplifies another piece of animal symbolism. The wolf here represents for a sexually inexperienced woman the terrifying aspect of the male, the fear of sexual contact. In its earliest versions the story possibly served as a warning to young girls against socially premature sexual relations with men. Animals in dreams may certainly have a sexual meaning and the wolf is an obvious example of this, if only because the word Volf is itself commonly applied to men whose sexual lust is unbounded and purely ‘animal’. See also Frog, Wolf.

(7) If in your dream you arc being chased by an animal, the animal probably represents some (repressed) emotion or instinct. As long as you keep such things buried in your unconscious thev will continue to

plague and disturb you. Face up to whatever it is, and enter into receptive and patient dialogue with it.

(8) The killing of an animal may symbolize cither what has been described in (5) above (but now given exaggerated, dramatic expression) or the actual destruction of some essential, because natural, part of your psyche. The second alternative would indicate some fear of your own instinctive nature, some phobic undervaluing of the body, the senses, or sex. You would have to be very honest to work out which of these alternatives - an irrational slaughter (repression) of the natural self (a symbolic castration), or a rational taming of an instinct diat is threatening the balance of the psyche - is applicable in your own case.... A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

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A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

Boss

(1) If your boss appears in vour dreams, the meaning could have something to do w’ith your real-life relationship with him or her.

(2) On the other hand - particularly if the boss is a man - he could be an authority figure symbolizing vour own super-ego (for super-ego).

(3) If vou are the boss in the dream, the one w ho is behaving in a masterful, bossy way, taking charge of things and giving orders, either the dream mav be show ing you what you are like in real life, and urging vou to relate differently to people, to be more gentle and receptive, more ready to cooperate (rather than command) or even to submit to another’s teaching or guidance, or it mav be asking you to be more

assertive than you are in real life. Provided you are honest with yourself, it should not be difficult to decide which of these alternatives applies to you.... A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

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A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

Cross

A cross may have private associations for you. On the other hand, the cross is such an ancient symbol that its meaning in a dream may have come from the collective - not the personal - unconscious (for this distinction).

(1) It may mean simply ‘no-go’: that something in your life has come to an end; or that it ought to come to an end. Look deeper into yourself for new directions, in both senses of the word.

(2) It may be a crossroads sign. See also Crossroads.

(3) Is the cross in the dream a burden? If so, don’t be too ready to accept the notion that crosses have to be borne. Discover what it is in your life or in yourself that constitutes a ‘cross’, and then remove it - dissolve it with a proper self-love. Burdens prevent you from reaching your full stature as a person.

(4) The cross may be a symbol of death. It may be that your present self, or something in you, must ‘die’ as a necessary prelude to new and fuller life.

(5) It may be a symbol of martyrdom. Is the martyrdom something you feel as an oppressive and crippling restraint, or is it self-imposed? These are not absolute alternatives: what is consciously felt as an undeserved punishment may be unconsciously self-inflicted - for some imagined guiltiness.

(6) A crucifix (cross with the crucified one fastened to it) will carry the symbolism of crucifixion, which may be either martyrdom (as in (5) above), or severe restraining of‘bodily^ or ‘earthly5 desires. Alternatively, it may represent extreme neglect of some psychic component or function (for repression and suppression). Decide whether your unconscious is recommending or protesting against the rcpression / suppression, and act accordingly.

(7) The Greek cross, having all four arms of equal length, may symbolize wholeness: the unified psyche - the unification of conscious and unconscious. (The union of opposites is represented by the vertical and horizontal lines of the cross; wholeness is represented by the way the arms reach out to embrace reality in all directions.) See also Mandala... A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

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A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

Priest

A priest may symbolize your own inner wisdom; or, alternatively, externally imposed commands and prohibitions. Which of these alternatives applies will be suggested by your feeling-response to the priest in the dream, and by the character of the priest himself: for example, does he speak with authority, or only authoritatively? Is he loving or aggressive and punitive?... A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

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A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

Experiment

There are alternatives in living; examine new concepts and ideas, open up new opportunities. Try something different. May also mean you are taking a chance.... The Dream Books Symbols

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The Dream Books Symbols

Compass

Your unconscious may be showing you the way, either because you are not satisfied with the direction your life is going or because you need time to reorient. This dream manifests that the haze you feel will end soon.

If the compass deviates in the dream and guidance is uncertain, you may have to change route. Other elements may appear in the dream suggesting alternatives for the future.

According to feng shui, the eight directions of the compass symbolize eight different qualities. The south is fame, fortune, and recognition; southwest, marriage, and happiness in love and relationships; west, children and creativity; northwest, charitable people, mentors, and network connections; north, career success; northeast, knowledge, academy, and introspection; east, family, the elderly, people with authority, and health; and southeast, finally, wealth and prosperity.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

Eating

The dreams in which you ingest food have often a purely physiological origin (simply, you are hungry). However, these images can also be representing your “hunger” in intellectual, emotional, and professional matters. So, if you eat something you dislike it means your current situation displeases you in any of the stated elements. You only remain on it, solely and exclusively, because you are unable to propose new alternatives.

If you dream you swallow something you dislike without chewing it first, it indicates you do not want to face an unpleasant issue. In contrast, a food binge warns you against a saturation (physical or mental) so you should enhance communication with others. To Freud, the mouth was a primary erogenous zone. The dreams in which you eat, therefore, are closely related to sexuality. A food binge, in this regard, denotes that you are too lenient in the sexual arena. Starving, however, denotes the denial of your sexual needs.

If the dream’s atmosphere is pleasant it reflects intimacy with others and good relations. Otherwise, it relates to the frigidity and the poor condition of your social contacts.

Usually, it warns against a dispute or economic loss. Eating salt or lard means you will be the subject of a heated argument.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

Door / Keyhole

In dream-lore, to pass through a door and enter a house is a decisive and symbolic action as the door represents the passage from one state of being to another. Freud and Jung agreed that the house signified the self and the body, but disagreed about the doors of a house. For Freud, doors are dream images representing the body’s orifices, whilst for Jung, doors express the dreamer’s relationship to their conscious and unconscious world. According to Jungians, a door opening outwards suggests a need to open up to others, whereas a door opening inwards suggests the need for greater reflection or a desire to explore the inner self.

In general, most dream analysts believe that entering through a door signifies new opportunities that will be presented to you. Doors and doorways represent an opportunity for either positive or negative change. You may be entering into a new stage in your life, moving from one level of consciousness to another.

If your dreaming mind portrayed you as stepping through a door, it signals your willingness to embrace change and the unknown, whilst letting someone in through the door indicates your willingness to interact with them.

If you were faced by a confusing number of doors, you may be feeling overwhelmed by choices in life and unsure which opening is right for you.

If you simply can’t find the door to escape through in your dream, then perhaps you feel unable to express yourself in waking life. To dream of locked doors signifies opportunities that are denied, unavailable to you or ones on which you have missed out. Also consider who or what you are shutting out of your life if your dream features a door; perhaps as one dream door closes, another will open…

More specifically, a front door usually symbolizes unfamiliar outside circumstances—if a doormat features in your dream as well, you may be allowing others to walk all over you in real life—while a backdoor stands for the more familiar traffic of people we already know. Unwanted changes in your life are often depicted in dreams as intruders or strangers at the door, and if you are beginning a new relationship and themes of burglary or home invasion appear in your dreams, this does not necessarily mean your partner is dangerous; the dream may be providing an early warning of undercurrents in your relationship that are not nourishing to you. In some instances, the dark stranger at the door represents an aspect of yourself that is selfcritical and self- destructive.

Another dream featuring doors is that of being locked out or being unable to enter your home because you have lost your key. This image reflects a situation in which you are being prevented from accessing your talent, drive and energy. You have been locked out from the best part of yourself but the situation can be easily corrected by remembering your key next time, or finding another way in. In most cases, the key indicates willingness to change and to experiment with alternatives. Keyholes in dreams allow you to view that which is otherwise concealed; if this image appears in your dream, ask yourself whether your privacy is being invaded in some way or whether you are prying into affairs that are no concern of yours. A rusty key may indicate talents that are being neglected. Freud viewed the key as a phallus and saw potent sexual symbolism in the trio of key, door and the door’s subsequent opening. Finally, to dream that you hear or ring a door bell foretells of unexpected news.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

What Are Dreams For?

“Trust in dreams, for in them the gateway to eternity is hidden.”
KHALIL GIBRAN

Dreams and their purpose
Consider dreams like home movies that each person produces in response to their daily experiences. These movies are meant to clarify certain situations and support the person. With sufficient knowledge, they can become a sort of spiritual guide, since oneiric thoughts are a window to the subconscious where, frequently, hidden feelings and repressed needs are stored without us realizing.

Even then, there are people who question the importance of dreams. Some scientists, for example, believe that the content of dreams is simply a random mix of the many electronic signals the brain receives. Others, however, find all types of messages in even the simplest dreams, and end up distancing themselves from daily reality in favor of oneiric activity.

Neither extreme is advisable. Each dream is undoubtedly a journey into the unknown, but, at the same time, modern psychology has allowed us to understand a good part of their structure. One of the conclusions drawn from the study of dreams confirms this: dreams can be a priceless aid to the imagination, but above all when it comes to solving problems. You just have to know how to listen to them, because their content tends to have a direct relation to the emotional challenges you are experiencing.

Each dream is a journey to the unknown with an implicit personal message. Although it is the content of the episode that determines our emotional state, dreaming in black and white indicates a possible lack of enthusiasm or nostalgia for the past. These dreams are an invitation to live with more intensity and enjoy the present.

Still from the film Viaje a la Luna (Méliès, 1902).

It is known that in times of crisis, our oneiric production increases significantly, both in quantity and intensity. Should we consider this “surplus” to be positive? Yes, as long as one makes an effort to remember and interpret the dreams, since, as we will see further on, they have a valuable therapeutic potential.

For example, if a couple is going through a critical phase, remembering and analyzing usually helps them understand the subconscious reactions they have to the situation. In other words, dreams are an excellent tool to get to the bottom of emotional conflicts. Knowing the causes is an essential step to resolving the problems, regardless of what course you take.

The English psychologist David Fontana, whose books have been translated into more than twenty languages, said it clearly: “In listening to my patients’ dreams in therapy sessions, I have observed how, often, these can take us right to the root of the psychologic problem much quicker than other methods.” Although, we shouldn’t fool ourselves: dreams are a mystery that can rarely decipher everything. But if a certain level of interpretation helps us understand ourselves better, what more can we ask for? From a practical point of view, our own oneiric material can be very useful.

In dreams, relationships with others are a recurring theme. The people that appear in our dreams, especially strangers, represent facets of ourselves that the subconscious is showing us.

Well-known writers such as Robert Louis Stevenson, William Blake, Edgar Allan Poe, and Woody Allen have had faith in this, acknowledging that part of their works have been inspired by dreams. The discoveries of Albert Einstein or Niels Bohr (father of modern atomic physics), among other celebrated scientists, had the same origin. In any case, these examples shouldn’t confuse us: no dream can tell you what path to follow through symbolic images without the intellect to decipher them.

Prosperity, precognition, and pronostics
What’s more, judging by some documented cases, we can even reap material gain from dreams. There is proof of some people that had premonitory dreams managing to earn significant sums of money thanks to their oneiric “magic.” The most spectacular case was in the fifties, when an Englishman named Harold Horwood won a considerable number of prizes betting on horses. His dreams transmitted clues as to the winning racehorse to bet on. Unfortunately, these types of premonitions don’t come to everyone. However, anyone has the opportunity to discover the greatest treasure of all—knowledge of one’s self—through their dreams.

We’ve all experienced the feeling of having lost control of our lives at some point. We might feel like others are deciding things for us or that we are victims of our circumstances.

Our “dream-scapes” contain valuable information about our desires and concerns; they could also function as a forecast of some aspect of our future. According to ancient tradition, dreaming of stars predicts prosperity and spiritual wealth. “Starry Night” (Van Gogh, 1889).

However, many psychologists disagree with this. That is, they argue that daily events are not coincidences but rather meaningful deeds that reflect the inner state of the individual.

Dreams and thoughts
According to these experts, luck is a pipe dream, something that does not exist, since that which we consider the result of coincidence is none other than the natural manifestation of our thoughts and attitudes. We are basically creator, not passive receivers or victims of the events that unravel in our lives.

An example that illustrates this idea perfectly is the story of the old man who threw rocks into the sea. One day, someone asked if he ever got bored of the simple game. The old pebble thrower stared at his questioner and gave an answer he’d never forget: “My small stones are more important than they seem, they provoke repercussions. They will help create waves that, sooner or later, will reach other other side of the ocean.”

What does this have to do with dreams? It’s simple: as we’ve just seen, we are the only ones responsible for our daily experiences, no matter how hard that is to believe. Therefore it shouldn’t be too difficult to take control of our lives; we just have to listen to the messages in our interior, that is, our oneiric thoughts, of which we are ultimately the authors.

Visualizations
In this way, thanks to dreams, our two existences—conscious and unconscious—can work together to make our lives more creative and free. An important part of this process is getting to know and understanding better the process of thought. One of the most beautiful and commonly used visualizations in yoga reminds us of this: “In the bottom of the lake of our thoughts is a jewel. In order for it to shine in the light of the sun (the divine), the water (the thoughts) must be pure and crystal clear and calm, free of waves (excitement). If our water is murky or choppy, others can’t see this jewel, our inner light...”

In the bottom of the lake of our thoughts is a jewel...

But it’s not that simple: it’s often difficult to discern the connection that unites wakefulness with sleep, between what we think ourselves to be and what our oneiric fantasies say about us. In any case, if our search is passionate and patient, constant and conscious, it will result in the discovery of our true Self. Therefore the interpretation of dreams cuts right to the heart of the message conceived by and for ourselves (although not consciously). It is important to learn to listen to them (further on we will discuss techniques for this) when it comes time to unstitch their meaning and extract the teachings that can enrich our lives.

The rooms in our dreams reflect unknown aspects of our personality.

In this way, when we have to make an important decision, we can clear up any doubts through a clear understanding of our most intimate desires. Although it may seem like common sense, this is not that common these days, since most people make decisions at random, out of habit, or by impulse.

The meaning and psychic effect of some deities in Tibetan Buddhism can be linked to the monsters that are so popular today.

Dreams allow creativity a free rein and free us from worry, sometimes resulting in surreal images that would be impossible in waking life.

Put simply, the idea is to find your true identity and recognize your wounds, fears, and joys through dreams. Never forget that the subconscious, although hidden, is an essential part of our personality. Dreams are fundamental for understanding the Self, since they are a direct path to this little-known part of ourselves. Their symbolic content allows us to recover repressed emotions and gives us a map to the relationships that surround us.

Nightmares that put us to the test
Sometimes the messages they bring us are not so pleasant and take the form of nightmares. However, although it may be hard to accept, these nightmares are valuable warnings that some aspects of our life are not

in harmony with our deepest Self and thus need our prompt intervention. Nightmares are proof that self discovery is not always pleasant. Sometimes it’s necessary to feel this pain in order to find out what you really are and need.

On the other hand, dreams give creativity a free rein because, when we sleep, we are free from our day-to-day worries. Therefore, even if you don’t consider yourself a creative person, keep in mind that all the scenes, symbols, and characters that appear in your dreams have been created solely and exclusively by you.

It’s often very helpful to record dreams in a notebook (we will explain how further on) in order to later analyze them and apply their teachings to daily life.

It is quite the paradox; the human being awakens their most intimate reality precisely when they are sleeping.

Carl Gustav Jung, who dedicated his life to studying dreams, developed this metaphor: “People live in mansions of which they only know the basements.” Only when our conscience is sleeping do we manage to unveil some of the rooms of our magnificent house: rooms that may be dusty and inhospitable and fill us with terror and anxiety, or magnificent rooms where we want to stay forever.

Given that they all belong to us, it is reasonable to want to discover them all. Dreams, in this sense, are a fundamental tool.

How to remember dreams
At this point, you’re probably thinking, “Sure, dreams are really important, but I can’t use them because I simply don’t remember them.” That’s not a problem, there are techniques you can use to strengthen your memory of oneiric thoughts. Techniques that, when applied correctly, allow us to remember dreams surprisingly well.

The use of these methods is indispensable in most cases since people tend to forget dreams completely when they wake up. Why? Because, according to the hypothesis of Sigmund Freud, we have a sort of internal censor that tries to prevent our oneiric activity from becoming conscious material.

Sometimes the message of dreams turns unpleasant and takes the form of a nightmare...

However, we can laugh in the face of this censor with a few tricks. The most drastic is to wake up suddenly when the deepest sleep phase (REM phase) is just about to end, so that you can rapidly write all the details of your mind’s theater in your notebook. Waking suddenly will take this censor by surprise, stopping it from doing its job. The best time to set the alarm is for four, five, six, or a little more than seven hours after going to sleep.

If your level of motivation is not high enough to get up in the middle of the night and record your dreams, there are alternatives that let you sleep for a stretch and then remember what you dream with great precision.

First of all, it’s helpful to develop some habits before going to bed, such as waiting a few hours between dinner and going to sleep. Experts recommend avoiding foods that cause gas (legumes like green beans, raw vegetables, etc.) and foods high in fat.

You must also keep in mind that, like tea and coffee, tobacco and alcohol alter the sleep cycle and deprive the body of a deep sleep (the damaging effects of a few glasses on the body does not disappear for about four hours).

What is recommended is to drink water or juice, or eat a yogurt, more than two hours after eating, before going to bed. There are two main reasons for this: liquids facilitate a certain purification of the body, and because, most interestingly for our purposes, it causes us to get up in the middle of the night. As we said, this will catch the internal censor by surprise and allow us to record our dreams easily.

Relaxing in bed and going over the events of the day helps free the mind and foster oneiric creativity.

Yoga exercises, such as the savasana pose, are great for relaxation, restful sleep, and a positive outlook.

Relaxation
It’s important to surround yourself with an environment that stimulates oneiric activity. You should feel comfortable in your room and your bed. The fewer clothes you wear to sleep, the better. Practicing relaxation techniques, listening to calming music, or taking a warm bath a few minutes before getting into bed will help relieve stress so that you enjoy a deep restorative sleep.

There are good books on relaxation on the market, both autogenous and yogic; we recommend one of the most practical, Relajacion para gente muy ocupada (Relaxation for Busy People), by Shia Green, published by this same publishing house. However, the real key is to concentrate on remembering dreams. When you go to bed, go over the events of the day that were important to you. This way, you will increase the probability of dreaming about the subjects that most interest or worry you.

So, let’s suppose you’re asleep now. What should you do to remember dreams? First, try to wake up naturally, without external stimuli. If this isn’t possible, use the quietest possible alarm without radio. Once awake, stay in bed for a few moments with your eyes closed and try to hold your dreams in your memory as you gently transition into wakefulness. Take advantage of this time to memorize the images you dreamt. The final oneiric period is usually the longest and these instants are when it is most possible to remember dreams.

Remember that it’s best to write the keywords of the dream immediately upon waking. It is convenient to keep a notebook on the nightstand and reconstruct the dream during the day.

The dream notebook
Next, write in the notebook (that you have left beside your bed) whatever your mind has been able to retain, no matter how absurd or trivial your dreams seem, even if you only remember small fragments. This is not the moment to make evaluations or interpretations. The exercise is to simply record everything that crosses your mind with as much detail as possible. Giving the fragility of memory, it’s okay to start off with just a few key words that summarize the content of the dream. These words will help you reconstruct the dream later in the day if you don’t have enough time in the morning. Ideally this notebook will gradually become a diary or schedule that allows you to study, analyze, and compare a series of dreams. Through a series of recorded episodes, you can detect recurring characters, situations, or themes. This is something that’s easy to miss at first glance. One important detail: specialists recommend you date and title each dream, since this helps you remember them in later readings.

It’s also interesting to complement your entries with relevant annotations: what feelings were provoked, which aspects most drew your attention, which colors predominated, etc. An outline or drawing of the most significant images can also help you unravel the meaning. Finally, you should write an initial personal interpretation of the dream. For that, the second part of this book offers some useful guidelines.

While we dream, there is a sort of safety mechanism that inhibits our movement. Therefore, sleepwalkers don’t walk during the REM phase. This protects us from acting out the movements of our dreams and possibly hurting ourselves. Still from the Spanish movie Carne de fieras (Flesh of beasts) (1936).

As we’ve seen, there are a series of techniques to remember dreams. This is the first step to extracting their wisdom. Now, given that oneiric thoughts are a source of inspiration for solving problems, wouldn’t it be great to choose what you dream about before you go to sleep? Rather than waiting for dreams to come to us spontaneously, try to make them focus on the aspects of your life that interest you.

How to determine the theme of dreams
Let’s imagine that someone is not very satisfied with their job. They’d like to get into another line of work but are afraid of losing the job security they enjoy. On one hand, they’re not so young anymore, they should take the risk to get what they really want. But they don’t know what to do. They need a light, a sign, an inspiration. In short, they need a dream. But not just any dream, a dream that really centers on their problem and gives answers.

However, if you limit yourself to just “consulting your pillow,” you won’t get the desired results. There is a possibility you will be lucky and dream about what you’re interested in, but more likely you will dream of anything but. If we are really prepared to dive into that which worries us most intimately, we can direct our dreams to give us concrete answers. Just like the techniques to remember dreams, the process is simple: before sleeping, we must concentrate on the subject of interest.

It’s also best to write in your notebook all the events and emotions of the day that were most important before you go to sleep.

Once your impressions and theme to dream have been noted, concentrate on the subject that most bothers you. Think about it carefully; propose questions and alternatives, “listen” to your own emotions. It’s best if all possible doubts are noted in the dream notebook. This way you’re more likely to receive an answer.

In order for it to be an effective answer, the question must be well defined. The fundamental idea of the problem should be summed up in a single phrase. Once you’ve reflected on the problem, it’s time to go to bed. But the “homework” is not finished yet. Before going to sleep, you need to concentrate on the concrete question. You need to forget everything else, even the details. Just “visualize” and repeat the question, without thinking of anything else, until you fall asleep.

Oneiric thoughts are a source of inspiration. Annotating and analyzing them carefully fosters a process of self discovery.


Writing a dream notebook
You should always have a notebook and pen near your bed to write down dreams the moment you wake up. Don’t forget to always write the date. What details should you include in this kind of diary? As many as you remember, the more the better.

  • Note the events of the dream in order. It may not seem important when they appear unrelated. However, when analyzing them you can establish a chronological relationship between distinct elements.
  • What characters appear in your dreams? Was someone important missing? If one of them reminded you of someone you know, note that. Don’t rely on your memory.
  • If a familiar sight appears, analyze the differences between the dream and the real world. Were the doors/windows in the same place? Were they the same size and color? And so on. This is especially important if you want to practice lucid dreaming.
  • Also note the differences between familiar people in dreams and how
  • Also note the differences between familiar people in dreams and how they are in real life.
  • List the non-human characters that appeared, as well as any objects that behaved as if animated.
  • Take special note of recurrent themes, scenes, or characters. Do they always act/happen the same way?
  • Write down all the colors you remember.
  • Note your emotional reactions: if you feel happy, scared, nervous... Don’t let any theories about the meaning of dreams interfere. You run the risk of skipping details that might be very significant.
  • Finally, don’t trust your memory. After a time, you won’t remember a thing about some of the dreams you wrote down. No matter how clear they are in the moment, write them down.

Dreams are “signs,” messages from our subconscious, and the study and interpretation of them helps resolve the problems that worry us.

Nocturnal sleep puts us in touch with the deepest level of being, which allows us to approach our problems with a wider perspective. And induced dreams tend to be easier to remember than other oneiric activity.

When we dream, we enter a marvelous world that escapes the laws of spatial and temporal logic.... Dreampedia

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