Myself | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream:

The Second Story

A man once came to Hazrat Imaam Ja’far (RA) and said.”I saw myself as if I were embracing the moon”.

The Imaan asked:. “Are you a bachelor?” He answered in the affirmative.

The Imaam said: “You shall marry the most beautiful lady of her time”. Thereafter, the person was not seen for a very long time. Then Suddenly he appeared one day and said to the Imaam. “My master! I have married the most beautiful lady of Madeenah. But last night I saw a dream as if I were carrying the moon”.

The Imaam interpreted this dream saying: “She Shall bear you the most beautiful boy of his time”. He said: “ She shall bear you the most beautiful boy of his time”. He said: “O master! At this very moment she is expecting”.

The reporter of this incident say that matters turned out to be exactly as the Imaam had interpreted. May Allah have mercy on the Imaam.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

True Incident

It is narrated that Rabee’ah bin Umayyah bin Khalf came to Hadhrat Aboo Baker As-Siddeeq (RA) and said: “ O khaleefah of the Messenger of Allah, I saw a dream last night.

I saw myself in a lush and green land. Then I suddenly saw myself in a barren land. At this stage I saw you clasping your neck with both your hands”.

Hadhrat Aboo Bakr As-Siddeeq (RA) : “if what you are saying is true then I am afraid you will forsake the Deen of Islam.

As for me all my affairs will remain protected and my hands will not be contaminated through worldly pursuits”.

The narrator says that during the Khilaafat of Hadhrat Umar (RA) Rabee’;ah Left Medinah to live in Rome . There he embraced Christianity in the presence of the then king and died as one.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Abreaction

Example: For some considerable time I have been troubled by a nightmarish dream which is so realistic sometimes I think I am going to die. In my dream I have swallowed something which is literally choking me or is going to poison me. I wake up and rush down the stairs to the kitchen, spitting and choking, holding my throat and making all sorts of disturbing noises which frighten my wife. I have had this dream as many as five or six times a night. My doctor says it could be to do with the last war. I was a child then and my dad constantly had to wake me up to take us down to the shelter, sometimes as many as four times a night, and we were bombed out twice. I cannot recall having any fears about this at the time’ (Mr KT).

Abreaction is a re-experiencing of painful or traumatic events or situations. In many dreams it is obvious that the process underlying dreams is attempting to trigger an abreac­tion. This suggests the dream process, as Jung and Hadfield say, is a self-regulatory one in our psyche. In many cases where a person explores the feeling content of their dreams in a confident way, abreaction occurs. Although it has been given different names in recent years, such as primal therapy, rolfing, discharge, catharsis, abreaction is still a basic psycho­logical healing process. Pans of our experience become re­pressed because there is an automatic reaction in us to avoid pain. Therefore painful experience may never be fully felt or understood at the time. Reliving them allows us to review and integrate vital information about ourselves. Frequently all the analysis in the world cannot relieve a neurotic pattern until the repressed emotion holding it in place is released and un­derstood.

The strength with which we hold out against allowing our being to abreact spontaneously is seen in the above example. Mr KT is brought to the brink of reliving his very stressful childhood again and again. Yet he manages to avoid actual memory and, in particular, the experiencing of any childhood emotions and fears.

The opposite is shown in this account by Clive, who explored with me a dream about being shot in the arm in his father s shop. ‘For several hours I could find noth­ing about the dream. My mind simply wandered. But with help I persisted. Suddenly I seemed to break through, first to seeing how the shop was a place in which I have uncon­sciously experienced great emotional pain. My father was al­ways criticising. Never a word of encouragement. Then I burst into powerful sobbing as I felt the pain of wanting my father to love me, instead of cnticising all the time, and help me grow into somebody capable of meeting life. And then, some­thing I just had not wanted to see, the 30 years of my life I had wasted by avoiding any contact with authority. My father was the original authority in my life. I had cut off from him be­cause of the lack of support, and I had done the same with school and other authority situations. But what a relief to un­derstand myself, and to meet that young vulnerable boy I used to be. How I loved him and understood him/myself.’ abroad General: your feelings about that country.

If you have lived in that country: overall experience of that place. Were you happy there, lonely? What characteristics of the people did you take in?... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Active / Passive

Example: I was in a house that I lived in many years ago. How I got there I do not know, but I saw myself sitting in an ordinary chair just behind the closed front street door. It was very quiet, and I was afraid, but I did not make any effon to move’ (Mrs J).

When we are an inactive observer in our dream, are all the time on the receiving end of dream action, or as in the exam­ple make no effon to move from discomfort, we are in a passive role.

If this occurs frequently in our dreams, we are probably passive in our waking life. This can gradually be changed by such techniques as active imagination.

It is our own emotions, fears and sexuality we are meeting in our dreams, so it is wise to take charge of our being rather than be a victim.

The following dream illustrates an active dreamer: ‘As I walked toward a house a number of demons or devils came at me menacingly, trying to stop me getting near the house. Although they made all the ghostly noises, I wasn’t at all afraid of them. I felt they were a damned nuisance, and to show them I meant business I grabbed one and with my right hand I gripped its flesh and squeezed. It started to squeak in pain and I squeezed harder’ (Clive J). ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Animus

The male within the female, shown as a man in a woman’s dreams. Physically a woman is predominantly fe­male, but also has a clitoris and produces some male hor­mones. Psychologically, we may only express part of our po­tential in everyday life. In a woman, the more physically dynamic, intellectual and socially challenging side of herself may be given less expression. Apart from this, some features, such as innovation and creative rational thought, may be held in latency. These secondary or latent characteristics are de­picted by the male in female dreams. In general we can say the man represents the woman’s mental and social power, her ability to act creatively in ‘the world’. It also holds in it an expression of her complex of feelings about men, gained as experience mostly from her relationship with—or lack of— father, but also from a synthesis of all her male contacts. So the whole realm of her expenence of the male can be repre­sented by the man in her dream, and is accessible through the image.

Good relationship with or marrying the man: shows the woman integrating her own ability to be independent and capable in outwardly active terms. This makes her more whole, balancing her ‘female’ qualities. It also shows the woman meeting her experience of her father in a healing way. This enables the woman to have a realistic relationship with an actual man. It also bnngs a sense of connectedness be­tween her conscious self and what she senses as the ‘commer­cial’ world. See father in this entry.

To be in conflict with the man, or unable to make real physical and pleasurable contact with him: suggests difficulty in meeting what may have been a painful or threatening expe­rience of father. This can lead to lack of ability to make clear judgments, and lack of decisiveness in areas outside feeling values. She is prone to acceptance of collective or long held social norms without question; family or national attitudes not applicable to present situations; and reasoning’ which actu­ally arises out of emotions connected to such family or social norms. Actual relations with men will be difficult, or entered into simply as a duty. Emotional or intimate merging with a man is threatening because it brings the woman close to the conflicts and pain connected with father. Sex may be possible but not a close feeling union. See man.

Christ Although people generally think of Christ as a histori­cal figure, in dreams Christ is not this at all. He is a powerful process in the human unconscious. In the west we give this process the name of Christ, but the process or archetype is universal and has various names in different cultures. Some­times represented in dreams as a fish or a big man, in general the Christ is an expression of the dreamer’s own potential— what they can become in their life. But it also depicts what might be called a sense of the forces of symbiosis or co­operative activity operative in human life and the cosmos. There are at least four aspects to Chrisi as depicted in dreams.

The Sunday school or Church Christ: depicts social norms, the generally accepted morals and social rules. This Christ’ comes about because the Church tends to represent tradi­tional values, and also the attempt to press people to live these values.

The dreamer may have a childlike relationship with this Christ or, if attempting to be self responsible, be in con­flict with it. Some people find this Christ has a castrating role in their life, and flee in horror. In fact this aspect of social indoctrination may lead to such a burden of guilt and sup­pression that it can create psychic cripples. Trying to do all the right’ things may lead us to the point where ‘we can’t say no to a glass of water without a pang of guilt*. Two of the great forces which push at the human soul or psyche are social pressure, such as the moral norm, and biological pressures, such as the sex drive, individuals may fight a lifelong battle with one or the other of these.

The social cnminal typifies battle with the first; the ascetic, battle with the second.

The ideal Christ: the psychological process which causes us not to take responsibility for our own highest ideals; our own yearnings for the good, our own most powerful urges arising against what we see as evils in the world. This influ­ences us to wait for a sign from Christ in our dream in order to gain authority, or to overcome the anxiety associated with the drive. We want God to say we should act in a cenain way because we are not willing to be self responsible. Example: I stood outside a castle. It was closed and guarded by soldiers in armour. Wondering how to get in I thought that if I dressed and acted as a soldier I would be allowed entrance. It worked and inside Christ met me and said he had important work for me to do’ (Sonia).

The closely guarded secret is Soma’s own impulse to do some son of socially creative work. She doesn’t want to acknowledge the impulse as her own; it is much easier if she can say ‘Christ told me to do this’. In this way she avoids direct encounter with opposition.

The unofficial Chnst. Example: A fierce battle was raging with bullets flying. I immediately fell down and played “dead”. It wasn’t that I was hurt in any way, but I didn’t want to be at any risk in the fight. As I lay there, I saw a tall well built man in soldier’s uniform walk to me. He gave no sign of any fear concerning the bullets, and quietly knelt beside me. I felt he was Christ, but was confused by him being a soldier. He placed a hand on my back and gradually worked his fin­gers under the shell of a large limpet type creature that I had never before known was parasitically attached to my back. I could feel him pull it away, but knew its tentacles still ran right into my chest. He then sat me up and told me how I could rid myself of the tentacles and so be healed’ (Peter Y).

Peter had a debilitating psychosomatic illness at the time of the dream, causing pain where the tentacles ran.

The shell is his defence against feeling his own hurts and inner conflicts.

The dream shows him contacting a strength which is not afraid of his internal battlefield of conflicts, and can show ways of healing real human problems.

The healing rests upon the dreamer’s conscious action, not Christ’s, suggesting the dreamer taking responsibility for his own situation. Peter real­ised he had been avoiding his own internal battlefield, but felt he had met a strength which would support his efforts to find healing. In fact he met his conflicts and grew beyond his ailments. Peter’s conflicts were between his love for his chil­dren and his sexuality. This Christ is our undammed life; the flood of loving sexuality; the strength to burst through social rules and regulations because love of life pushes us. It doesn’t give a hang about bullets, death, nght or wrong, because it has a sense of its own integral existence within life, and its own lightness and place in eternity.

The integral or cosmic Christ. Example: ‘I am a journalist reponing on the return of Christ. He is expected on a paddle steamer going upstream on a large river. I am very sceptical and watch disciples and followers gather on the rear deck.

The guru arrives, dressed in simple white robes. He has long, beautiful auburn hair and beard, and a gentle wise face. He begins to tap a simple rhythm on a tabla or Indian drum. It develops into complex intermingling of orchestral rhythms as everyone joins in. I now realise he is Christ, and feel over­whelmed with awe as I try to play my part in the music. I’m tapping with a pen and find myself fumbling.

A bottle or can opener comes to me from the direction of Christ. I try to beat a complementary rhythm, a small pan of a greater, universal music’ (Lester S).

Each of us has a sense of connectedness with the whole, with the cosmos. We may be little aware of this sense, our scepticism may deny it, as Lester’s was doing. But finding it can enrich the rest of our nature.

The sense bnngs with it a realisation of taking part in the unimaginably grand drama called life. It gives a feeling, no matter what the state of our body, crippled or healthy, that we have something that makes any faults in body or achievement insignificant. It doesn’t take all the difficulties out of life, but it is a good companion on the way. In dreams and religion Christ is also represented as the son of the Cosmos or God. This aspect of Christ is cosmic, from beyond the Earth. This is a process in the cosmos which the unconscious senses and presents under the image of Christ, or other figures in different religions.

It is possible that there is an innate process in human beings to do with love and symbiosis which humanity became aware of at a particu­lar stage in the development of consciousness. This becoming aware was expressed in what we know as the histoncal Jesus. See religion and dreams; the self within this entry. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Baby

General: one s own feelings and urges at that level of development—such as possessiveness, joy, curiosity, innocent love, infant trauma; feelings of helplessness; vulnerability, lack of responsibility; being cared for. Also a new phase of life; a new idea; new activity—as when we say someone has a new baby, meaning a new project or business. When with a couple: the marriage—what is created in a relationship; the life process in us, based on reproduction. In a woman’s dream: desire for baby; responsibility of caring for baby; wor­ries about having healthy baby. In a man’s dream: desire for parenthood; weight of responsibility; fear of inability to pro­duce. In child’s dream: themselves at that age; feelings about a baby sibling.

Example: ‘I have my own baby who is lying in a cot in a bedroom looking very weak and pathetic with eyes closed. I know that he or she is getting weaker and weaker through lack of food and care. In fact the baby seems to be dying.

The feelings of guilt are terrible because I know it is my responsi­bility to do something to make it well. I keep saying to myself I must go and feed that baby—but I don’t. I just keep worry­ing and feeling guilty’ (JC). Because of circumstances we may not have been able to satisfy all our babyhood needs—we may have been weaned earlier than we wanted, our need for attention may have been unsatisfied—and these are shown as a baby in our dreams, as with JC. Dreams such as the above show how we sense the need of this pan of us to be cared for and nourished.

If some of these earliest needs are not met in some way, the development of our enthusiasm, our pleasure and ability to be involved and self-giving, may be cunailed.

Example: ‘I am 48, have two children in their late teens and definitely DO NOT want another baby. Nevertheless I have a recurring dream in which I am always in labour, expe­riencing no pain, and although there are nursing staff I am in some sort of laboratory, although everything is very pleasant. I never actually give birth and when I wake I always have a vague feeling of disappointment’ (VI). This dreamer’s con­scious decision to have no more children is in conflict with her biological urge for another baby.

Example: My mouth was full of what looked like liver. It was also coming out of my left ear. When I turned away from the mirror I saw medical people in caps and gowns who kept telling me to bear down. I then gave birth to a baby out of my mouth. I am an invalid and very sick at present’ (Mr MS). This man’s dream is about preparation for death.

The baby is the extraction of all that can live on after his present life is left behind in death. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Body

It refers to oneself, as in the word sorcxehxty. Al­though it includes the totality of our expenence, it seems to be most pointedly referring to our sense of identity. From this sense of ourself we project meaning on to the rest of the world in some degree. Thus many symbols are stylised body forms.

The cross is a standing figure with arms outstretched, a church’s structure a representation of the body, and the mira­cle of sexual reproduction—the mystery enacted within it; a maypole, the penis. Therefore various things can represent our body or aspects of ourself. Seeds, swallowed teeth can be sperm, anything long and pointed, even a linger, can be the penis; anything hairy, a male; anything receptive like a bottle, bowl or cave, a woman or vagina.

A body, or our body, also represents physical life; material existence; the process which causes growth and aging. This includes all the processes of nature in us.

A dead body: our skin or shape is felt as our boundary, the edge of our universe.

The dead body depicts a whole set of personality traits or attitudes, very often potentials, which have been denied life by us. We have not allowed them expression.

A person hun in love might kill out any feelings towards the opposite sex. This ‘dead pan of them can be shown as a body. May also be the way we meet feelings about death. Sickness in body: can refer to an awareness of illness in pan of body shown. Most often depicts psychological problem symbolised by pan of body— see body pans below. Maggots in body: possible need to cleanse body of toxins or infection, sense of dis-ease emotion­ally in that area of self. Iniunes: huns or events that may lead to emotional scars—see body areas below. See dead people dreams; hiding.

Bodiless: Example: lI felt as if I was going very deep inside myself. It was dark but at first there were noises of the world around me. I seemed to go in much deeper and it was very dark, but with the feeling of great space. Everything was all right until I didn’t hear any noise at all, all that space and no noise was too much and my whole body freaked out and then pulled out very fast before I could stop it’ (Kate P).

The ‘noises’ around us, sensory impressions, other people s ex­pressed feelings and actions, are building bricks for our sense of self. In a real sense we create each other by believing in each other. With prolonged absence of other people and events, and especially if we lose our noises’ and body aware­ness, we feel we—our sense of identity—is dying. Bodiless- ness may therefore show us feeling unrecognised, unnoticed. May also be feelings of loneliness; being cut off from sexuality and body drives. In its positive side it is exploration of the unconscious and void. See identity and dreams.

If you are right handed, the left of the body: represents inner feelings which support outer action, such as confidence, our less used or supportive functions.

If we are an intellectual, the left might depict one’s feelings, and vice versa.

The left may represent our mother’s influence in our life and body.

The right of the body: our outer activity and dominant func­tions; expressed abilities; our father’s influence in life and body.

If father is an anxious man there might be a lot more signs of stress on this side of the body. Top half of body: thinking, feeling. Bottom half: sexuality and instincts. Half a body: if top missing, lack of thinking and higher emotion; if bottom, trauma to, loss or denial of, sexuality and sensuality. Old head on baby body: immature sexuality and emotions; vice versa: immature personality. Dismembered body: emo­tional or mental stress and breakdown; may be followed by emergence of new self.

The areas of our body are sometimes thought of as sense organs. This may seem strange but is very simple. Without language, communication would be difficult. So language en­ables us to sense what another being is communicating.

If we had been castrated or had a hysterectomy prior to adoles­cence, we would never develop sexually. Without that devel­opment we would not understand two kissing people; or what a mother was feeling when she held her baby. Out of the sex drive develops a whole world of feelings and tenderness which enables us to understand many things we see in the world.

It is therefore important when reading the particular de­scriptions below to remember that each psychological area of our body gives us some insight into ourself and life around us, which is missing if the area is injured or traumatised. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Catacomb, Crypt

Example: T was in some kind of cave or crypt. My father told me and my family of his coming death. He was calm and caring but my mother, sister and myself were grief stricken and for some reason went to buy him gifts’ (Clare M). Usually refers to feelings connected with death, as in the example. It suggests, even in this, a womblike condi­tion, and birth or a child may also figure in the same dream. Also a place of power or hidden forces, where a connection may be made with our unconscious, our inner link with other people and the energies of our body. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Chased

Example: Three men with clubs were chasing me, but never actually caught me as I woke in terror. I was deter­mined to tell myself it was only a dream, and the next night as they were chasing me I remembered it was only a dream and lost all fear—stopped running—turned to face them and said This is only a dream, you can’t hurt me.” As they came closer they faded into nothing and I never saw them again’ (Account of dreams when six years old. Mr C).

The example shows how we can be pursued by fears or emotions, and can either continue to avoid them or face them. We are, in a real sense, pursued by what we have created with our thoughts, emotions, action and inaction. What we are avoiding might be sexual feelings; responsibility; expressing what we really feel in public; our fear of death; sense of failure; guilt; emo­tional pain; grief, etc. We can never escape from ourself, so such feelings may pursue us through life unless we meet them.

Chased by opposite sex: afraid of love or sex, haunted by a past relationship. By animal: one’s passions; anger, natural feelings. By Thing or shadowy creature: usually past experi­ence or trauma, a hurt from childhood. Chasing: something you are pursuing in life; something or someone you want; aggression. See follow. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Death And Rebirth

The symbols of death or the fear of death can be: sunset; evening; a crossed river or falling in a river, a skeleton; snarling dogs; sleep; anaesthetic; gravestones; ceme­tery; blackness, or something black; ace of spades; a fallen mirror; stopped clock; a pulled tooth; an empty abyss, the chill wind; falling leaves; a withering plant; an empty house; a lightning-struck tree; coffin; struggling breaths; the dead ani­mal in the gutter; the rotting carcass, underground; the depths of the sea; the Void.

What lies beyond death is conjecture, but the archetype of death we are considering is not completely about physical death.

It is about our observation of it in others; our concep­tions of it gained from our culture and our impressions; the feelings which generate around our experiences and thoughts; our attempts to deal with our own aging and approach to death, plus what material the deeper strata of our unconscious release regarding it.

It is about how our sense of conscious personal existence meets the prospect of its disintegration.

Unless we can come to terms with what is behind the haunting images of death we meet in our dreams, we fail to live fully and daringly, we are too haunted by death lurking in the shadows of injury and the unknown. Images of death and the associated emotions, carried within for years, can have a negative influence on our health. Coming to terms means the courage to feel the emotions of fear or chill and discover them for what they are—emotions. They are certainly not death, only our feelings about it.

The differences shown in the two following examples illustrate the avoiding and the meeting. Example: 4So to get to the bedroom I had to jump across this gap. I tried to jump but missed and I fell and hit the bottom.

The next thing I remember was I was floating up. I looked down and saw myself lying face down with arms spread out and I suddenly realised I was dead. I was so frightened that I woke up. I had the feelings of fear of dying, but I felt no pain’ (Cath). Example: “Suddenly I was in a huge underground cav­ern. It was hundreds of feet high and as wide. It had two great statues in it, both to do with death.

The whole place overpow­ered me with a sense of decay and skeletal death, darkness, underground, earth, the end. I cried out in the dismal cave, “Death, where is your sting! Grave, where is your victory!” I immediately had the sense of being a bodiless awareness. I knew this was what occurred at death. Fear and the sense of decay left me’ (Andrew).

Summarising these and many other dreams, it is not only the accumulated images of death, but also bodilessness and loss of power and identity which bring so much fear. There are two antipodes of human experience. At the tip of one is focused self-determining self consciousness. At the tip of the other is unfocused void without identity. Strangely enough we experience both each day in some degree—the first while awake, the second when we sleep. Yet to face the second with consciousness feels like all the horrors of death and loss. Yet facing it is important, especially to the second half of life.

The symbols of rebirth are: the cave; an egg; spring; the tree; the cross; dawn; emerging out of the sea; the snake; the bird; a seed; arising from the earth or faeces; green shoot from a dead branch; phoenix; flame; a pearl; the womb. Rebirth is as difficult to face as death. It holds within it not just the memones of the struggles and difficulties of our own physical birth and growth, but also the challenge of becoming the un­known future, the dark possibility, the new.

The dream of Andrew in the underground cavern is an example of positive rebirth. After realising himself as bodiless awareness he emerges from the cave and finds himself near a tree. Example: ‘A tremendous jolt of power poured into me from the tree. I saw that we had arrived at a place where a line of trees, about a 100 yards in length, stood very close together in a slight semicircle on the top of a bank.

The trees had great spiritual power and the place was a holy temple. Two spiritual beings were there—an ancient Earth Being, and Christ’ (Andrew).

The next example is of a dream typical of meeting memo­ries of physical birth. As can be seen, the experience is pow­erful enough to cause physical shaking. Example: All I can see of what I enter is a very narrow space with a light showing through. But immediately I enter I realise I have made a mis­take for I am being forced swiftly through a dark, very narrow tunnel. I feel pain as I am dragged along and I hear loud banging noises which frighten me, but although they are loud they seem to come from inside my head. I feel terrified and breathless and very relieved when I wake before reaching the end of the tunnel. In fact as I write this account I am shiver­ing” (female, anon). ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Analysis

Sigmund Freud was the founder of modern therapeutic analysis of dreams. Freud encouraged clients to relax on a couch and allow free associations to arise in con­nection with aspects of their dream. In this way he helped the person move from the surface images (manifest content) of the dream to the underlying emotions, fantasies and wishes (latent content), often connected with early childhood. Be­cause dreams use condensation—a mass of different ideas or experiences all represented by one dream image or event— Freud stated that the manifest content was meagre’ compared with the ‘richness and variety’ of latent content.

If one suc­ceeds in touching the feelings and memories usually con­nected with a dream image, this becomes apparent because of the depth of insight and experience which arises. Although ideally the Freudian analyst helps the client discover their own experience of their dream, it can occur that the analyst puts to the client readymade views of the dream. Out of this has occurred the idea of someone else ‘analysing or telling us about our dream.

Carl Jung used a different approach. He applied amplifica­tion (see entry), helped the client explore their associations, used active imagination (see entry) and stuck to the structure of the dream. Because amplification also put to the client the information and experience of the therapist, again the dreamwork can be largely verbal and intellectual, rather than experiential.

In the approach of Fritz Perls (gestalt therapy) and Moreno (psychodrama), dream analysis is almost entirely experiential.

The person exploring the dream acts out or verbalises each role or aspect of the dream.

If one dreamt of a house, in gestalt one might stan by saying I am a house’ and then go on to describe oneself just as one is as the particular house in the dream.

It is important, even if the house were one existing externally, not to attempt a description of the external house, but to stay with the house as it was in the dream. This is like amplification, except the client gives all the information. This can be a very dramatic and emotional experience because we begin consciously to touch the immense realms of experience usually hidden behind the image. When successful this leads to personal insights into behaviour and creativity. See dream processing; amplification; gestalt dream work.

dream as a meeting place Any two people, or group of people who share their dreams, particularly if they explore the associated feelings and thoughts connected with the dream images, achieve social intimacy quickly. Whether it is a family sharing their dreams, or two fnends, an environment can be created in which the most profound feelings, painful and wonderful, can be allowed. Such exposure of the usually pri­vate areas of one s feelings and fears often presents new infor­mation to the dreamer, and also allows ventilation of what may never have been consciously expressed before. In doing so a healing release is reached, but also greater self under­standing and the opportunity to think over or reconsider what is discovered.

Herbert Reed, editor of the dream magazine Sundance, and resident in Virginia Beach, Va., initiated group dreaming ex­periments. It started because Reed noticed that in the dream groups he was running, when one of the group aired a prob­lem, other members would subsequently dream about that person’s problem. He went on to suggest the group should attempt this purposely and the resulting dreams shared to see if they helped the person with the problem.

The reported dreams often formed a more detailed view of the person’s situation. In one instance the group experienced many dream images of water. It aided the woman who was seeking help to admit she had a phobia of water and to begin thinking about learning to swim. In another experiment, a woman presented the problem of indecision about what college to transfer to and what to study. Her group subsequently said they were confused because they had not dreamt about school. Several had dreams about illicit sex. though, which led the woman to admit she was having an affair with a married man. She went on to realise that it was the affair which was underlying her indecision. She chose to end the affair and further her career.

Whatever may be underlying the results of Reed’s expen- ments, it is noticeably helpful to use the basic principles he is working with. They can be used by two people equally as well as a group—by a parent and child, wife and husband, busi­nessman and employee. One sets out to dream about each other through mutual agreement. Like any undertaking, the involvement, and therefore the results, are much more pro­nounced if there is an issue of reasonable importance behind the experiment. It helps if one imagines that during sleep you are going to meet each other to consider what is happening between you. Then sleep, and on waking take time to recall any dream. Note it down, even if it seems far removed from what you expected. Then explore its content using the tech­niques in dream processing.

Example: My wife and I decided to attempt to meet in our dreams. I dreamt I was in a room similar to the back bedroom of my previous marnage. My present wife was with me. She asked me to help her move the wardrobe. It reminded me of, but did not look like, the one which had been in that bed­room. I stood with my back to it, and reached my hands up to press on the top, inside. In this way I carried it to another wall. As I put it down the wood broke. I felt it ought to be thrown away’ (Thomas B). Thomas explored the dream and found he connected feelings about his first marriage with the wardrobe and bedroom. In fact the shabby wardrobe was Tom’s feelings of shabbiness at having divorced his first wife. In his first marriage, represented by the bedroom, he always felt he was married for life. In divorcing, he had done some­thing he didn’t like and was carrying it about with him. He says ‘1 am carrying this feeling of shabbiness and second best into my present relationship, and I need to get rid of it.’

dream as a spiritual guide Dreams have always been con­nected with the spiritual side of human experience, even though today many spiritual leaders disagree with consider­ation of dreams. Because dreams put the dreamer in touch with the source of their own internal wisdom and certainty, some conflict has existed between authoritative priesthood and public dreaming.

A lay person finding their own ap­proach to God in a dream might question the authority of the priests. No doubt people frequently made up dreams about God in order to be listened to. Nevertheless, despite opposi­tion, Matthew still dreamt of an angel appearing to him, Jo­seph was still warned by God to move Jesus; Peter still dreamt his dream of the unclean animals.

The modern scientific approach has placed large question marks against the concept of the human spirit. Study of the brain’s functions and biochemical activities have led to a sense of human personality being wholly a series of biological and biochemical events.

The results of this in the relationship between doctor and patient, psychiatrist and client, some­times results in the communication of human personality be­ing of little consequence. It may not be put into words, but the intimation is that if one is depressed it is a biochemical prob­lem or a brain malfunction.

If one is withdrawn or autistic, it is not that there is a vital centre of personality which has for some reason chosen to avoid contact, but that a biochemical or physiological problem is the cause—it’s nothing personal, take this pill (to change the biochemistry, because you are not really a person). Of course we have to accept that human personality must sometimes face the tragedy of biochemical malfunction, but we also need to accept that biochemical and physiological process can be changed by human will and courage.

In attempting to find what the human spirit is by looking at dreams, creativity stands out.

The spiritual nature may not be what we have traditionally considered it to be.

An overview of dreams and how dreamers relate to them suggests one amaz­ing fact. Let us call it the ‘seashell effect’. When we hear sounds in a shell that we hold to our ear, the noises heard seem exterior to oneself, yet they are most likely amplification of sounds created in our own ear, perhaps by the passage of blood. Imagine an electronic arcade machine which the player could sit in and, when running, the player could be engulfed in images, sounds, smell and sensation. At first there is shim­mering darkness, then a sound, and lights move. Is it a face seen, or a creature. Like Rorschach’s ink blots, the person creates figures and scenes out of the shapeless light and sound.

A devil appears which terrifies the player. People, de­mons, animals, God and angels appear and fade. Scenes are clearcut or a maelstrom of movement and ill-defined activity. Events arise showing every and any aspect of human experi­ence. Nothing is impossible.

If, on stepping out, we told the player that what occurred was all their own creation due to unconscious feelings, fears, habits, thoughts and physiological processes occurring within them, like the seashell effect, they might say ‘Good God, is that all it was, and I thought it was real. What a waste of time.’

Whether we can accept it or not, as a species we have created out of our own longings, fears, pain and perhaps vi­sion, God, with many different names—politics, money, dev­ils, nationalism, angels, an, and so on and on. All of it has flowed out of us. Perhaps we even deny we are the authors of the Bible, wars, social environments. Responsibility is diffi­cult.

It is easier to believe the source is outside oneself. And if we do take responsibility for our amazing creativity, we may feel ‘is that all it is—me?’ Yet out of such things, such fears, such drives, such unconscious patterns as we shape our dreams with, we shape our life and fonune, we shape our children, we shape the world and our future.

The shadow of fear we create in our dream, the situation of aloneness and anger, becomes a pattern of feelings, real in its world of mind. We create a monster, a Djinn, a devil, which then haunts and influences us. Or with feelings of hope, of purposiveness and love, create other forces in us and the world. But we are the creator. We are in no way separate from the forces which create our existence. We are those creative forces. In the deep­est sense, not just as an ego, we create ourselves, and we go on creating ourselves. We are the God humanity has looked so long for.

The second aspect of the human spirit demonstrated by dreams is consciousness.

The unconscious mind, if its func­tion is not clogged with a backlog of undealt with painful childhood experience and nonfunctional premises, has a pro­pensity to form gestalts. It takes pieces of experience and fits them together to form a whole. This is illustrated by how we form gestalts when viewing newsprint photographs, which are made up of many small dots. Our mind fits them together and sees them as a whole, giving meaning where there are only dots. When the human mind is working well, when the indi­vidual can face a wide range of emotions, from fear and pain to ecstasy, this process of forming gestalts can operate very creatively. This is because it needs conscious involvement, and if the personality is frightened of deep feeling, the uniting of deeply infantile and often disturbing cxpcrience is cut out. Yet these areas are very rich mines of information, containing our most fundamental learning.

If the process is working well, then one’s expenence is gradually transformed into insights which transcend and thereby transform one s personal life.

For instance, we have witnessed our own binh in some manner, we also see many others appeanng as babies. We see people ageing, dying. We see millions of events in our life and in others.

The uncon­scious, deeply versed in imagery, ritual and body language, out of which it creates its dreams, picks up information from music, architecture, traditional rituals, people walking in the street, the unspoken world of parental influence.

The sources are massive, unbelievable. And out of it all our mind creates meaning. Like a process of placing face over face over face until a composite face is formed, a synthesis of all the faces; so the unconscious scans all this information and creates a world view, a concept of life and death.

The archetypes Jung talks of are perhaps the resulting synthesis of our own expenence, reaching points others have met also.

If so, then Chnst might be our impression of humanity as a whole.

If we dare to touch such a synthesis of experience it may be seanng, breathtaking.

It breaks the boundaries of our present personality and con­cepts because it transcends. It shatters us to let the new vision emerge. It reaches, it soars, like an eagle flying above the single events of life. Perhaps because of this the great hawk of ancient Egypt represented the human spirit.

Lastly, humans have always been faced by the impossible.

To a baby, walking and not wetting its pants is impossible, but with many a fall and accident it does the impossible.

It is a god in its achievement.

To talk, to fly heavier-than-air planes, to walk on the Moon, were all impossible. Humans challenge the impossible every day. Over and over they fall, back into defeat. Many lie there broken. Yet with the next moment along come youngsters with no more sense than grasshoppers, and because they don’t know what the differ­ence is between right and left, do the impossible. Out of the infinite potential, the great unknown, they draw something new. With hope, with folly, with a wisdom they gain from who knows where, they demand more. And it’s a common everyday son of miracle. Mothers do it constantly for their children—transcending themselves. Lovers go through hell and heaven for each other and flower beyond who they were. You and I grow old on it as our daily bread, yet fail to see how holy it is. And if we turn away from it, it is because it offers no certainties, gives no authority, claims no reward.

It is the spir­itual life of people on the street. And our dreams remember, even if we fail.

For this is the body and blood of the human spirit.

dream as a therapist and healer There is a long tradition of using dreams as a base for both physical and psychological healing. One of the earliest recorded incidents of such healing is when Pharaoh’s ‘spirit was troubled, and he sent for all the magicians of Egypt and all its wise men; and Pharaoh told them his dream, but there was none who could interpret it’. Then Joseph revealed the meaning of the dream and so the healing of Pharaoh’s troubled mind took place (Genesis 41).

The Greek Temples of Asclepius were devoted to using dreams as a base for healing of body and mind (see dreams and ancient Greece).

The Iroquois Amerindians used a social form of dream therapy also (see Iroquoian dream cult).

The dream process was used much more widely throughout his­tory in such practices as Pentecostal Christianity, shaktipat yoga in India, and Anton Mesmer’s groups (see sleep move­ments).

Sigmund Freud pioneered the modern approach to the use of dreams in therapy, but many different approaches have developed since his work. Examples of the therapeutic action of gaining insight into dreams are to be found in the entnes on abreaction, recurring dreams, reptiles.

The entry on dream processing gives information about using a dream to gain insight and healing. See also dream as meeting place.

A feature which people who use their dreams as a thera­peutic tool mention again and again is how dreams empower them. Many of us have an unconscious feeling that any impor­tant healing work regarding our body and mind can only be undertaken and directed by an expert, the expert might be a doctor, a psychiatrist, psychotherapist, or osteopath. Witness­ing the result of their own dream process, even if helped by an expert, people feel in touch with a wonderful internal process which is working actively for their own good. One woman, who had worked on her dream with the help of a fnend (non expert), said It gave me great confidence in my own internal process. I realised there was something powerful in myself working for my own good. It was a feeling of cooperating with life.’ One is frequently amazed by one’s own resources of wisdom, penetrating insight and sense of connection with life, as met in dreamwork. This is how dreams play a pan in helping one towards wholeness and balance.

The growing awareness of one’s central view of things, which is so wide, piercing and often humorous, brings developing self respect as the saga of one’s dreams unfolds.

There may be no hint of this, however, if a person simply records their dreams without attempting to find a deeply felt contact with their contents.

It is in the searching for associ­ated feelings and ideas that the work of integrating the many strands of one’s life begins. Gradually one weaves, through a co-operative action with the dream process, a greater unifica­tion of the dark and the light, the painful and transcendent in one’s nature.

The result is an extraordinary process of educa­tion. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dreamer

Our current ‘self image’ is displayed by what we do in our dreams.

If we are the active and central character in our dreams, then we have a positive, confident image of our­self.

The role we place ourself in is also the one we feel at home with, or one which is habitual to us.

If we are con­stantly a victim in our dreams, we need to consider whether we are living such a role in everyday life. Dreams may help us look at our self image from a more detached viewpoint. We can look back on what we do in a dream more easily than we can on our everyday waking behaviour. This helps us under­stand our attitudes or stance, a very growth-promoting experi­ence.

It is important to understand the viewpoint of the other dream characters also; although they depict secondary views, they enlarge us through acquaintance. See identity and dreams.

What we ourself are doing in our dreams is an expression of how we see ourselves at the time of the dream, our stance or attitude to life, or what could be generalised as our self image. It typifies what aspects of our nature we identify with most strongly.

Example: My husband and I are at some sort of social club.

The people there are ex-workmates of mine and I am having a wonderful time and am very popular. My husband is enjoying my enjoyment’ (quoted from article by the author in She magazine).

The dreamer describes herself as ‘a mature 41- year old’.

The dream, and her description of it, sum up her image of herself in just a few words. She sees herself as attrac­tive, sociable, liked, happily married. She is probably good looking and healthy. But the dream carries on. She and her husband ‘are travelling down a country lane in an open horse drawn carriage.

It is very dark and is in the areas we used to live. We come to a hump-backed bridge, and as we amve at the brow of the bridge a voice says, “Fair lady, come to me.” My body is suddenly lying flat and starts to rise. I float and everything is black, warm and peaceful. Then great fear comes over me and I cry out my husband’s name over and over. I get colder and slip in and out of the blackness. I wake. Even with the light on I feel the presence of great evil. From a very positive sense of self, she has moved to a feeling which horri­fies her. How can such a confident, socially capable woman, one who has succeeded professionally as well as in her mar­riage, have such feelings? The answer probably lies in the statement of her age. At 41 she is facing the menopause and great physical change.

The image of herself she has lived with depended, or developed out of, having a firm sexually attrac­tive body, and being capable of having children. Losing what­ever it is that makes one sexually desirable must change the image others have of one, and that one has of oneself.

The hump of the bridge represents this peak of her life, from whence she will start to go downhill towards death, certainly towards retirement. So she is facing midlife crisis in which a new image of herself will need to be forged.

To define what self image is portrayed in your dreams, consider just what situation you have created for yourself in the dream, and what environment and people you are with. Example: I am a shy 16 year old and am worried about my dream. In it I am walking along the school’s main corridor. I try to cover myself with my hands as a few pei pie go by, not noticing me. Then a group of boys pass, pointing and laugh­ing at me—one boy I used to fancy.

A teacher then gives me clothes. They are too big but I wear them because I have nothing else’ (HM). Adolescence is a time of great change anyway, when a lot is developing as far as self image is con­cerned. Her nakedness shows how vulnerable she feels, and how she has a fear that other people must be able to see her developing sexuality and womanhood.

It is new to her and still embarrassing, particularly with boys she feels something for. She tries to cover up her feelings, and uses attitudes she has learnt from parents and teachers, but these are not suit­able. So we might summarise by saying that the situation she places herself in within the dream shows her present uncer­tainty and sense of needing clothes—attitudes or confidence —of her own. See identity in dreams; individuation. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

End

Used in many different ways, depending on context. Generally it represents a goal; point of change, release, death. Example: ‘I was due to be executed—what for I don’t know. I was not especially afraid of this, but my most vivid feelings were of great sadness at the people I was leaving behind, and for all the things I wanted to do in life, but would not now be able to. Then at the end I was watching myself being hanged’ (DK). Many people dream this ‘end of life’ theme. In virtually every one of these dreams there is a highlighting of ‘things to do’. Such dreams are a way of deciding what is of most value in the dreamer’s life.

End of path, road: the end of one’s life, the boundary of what one already knows or has done; end of a relationship (especially if walking with person). End of tunnel, cave, find­ing the way out of a difficult or depressed stage of life. End of table, queue: feeling left out, unconsidered, forgotten; putting oneself last. End of garden, room, road: can be used to show polarity or opposites, as in following. Example: ‘1 found my­self alone in the garden at the far end of the house near the stables’ (MM). Here the end’ relates to being alone, as op­posed to being in the house with people. Idioms: at an end, end of one’s tether, wits’ end; end of the day, be the end of; a sticky end; dead end, the deep end; end it all, end of the line; both ends meet; not the end of the world; loose ends; to no end; light at the end of the tunnel. See cul de sac. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Escape

Example: I dreamt I was a prisoner with many others. Myself and other men were outside the prison work­ing. Then a tremendous explosion blew a hole in the prison wall. I knew prisoners were trying to escape. I saw some wardens and shouted or signalled to the prisoners to be care- fiiT (Terry D). Terry worked as a therapist without scholastic qualification. Terry represents his attitudes to authority as the prison, and sees more of his work potential escaping those attitudes.

Example: ‘1 often dreamed I was being chased by boys or men. I would suddenly take off like a helicopter and fly away. Sometimes narrowly escaping from my pursuer’ (MC). As in the example, we often use escape’ in a dream to avoid diffi­cult feelings. This is like reading an exciting novel because it distracts our attention from problems in our marriage.

The problems remain. Something escaping from us: a realisation, emotion or opportunity eluding awareness. See enclosed.

ESP in dreams Many dreams appear to extend perception in different ways. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Evil

Example: ‘At the top of the stairs is a small door, half opened as if inviting me to go up. I get an overpowering sense of something evil beyond the door just waiting for me’ (Charles M). Usually refers to some of our own urges which we have judged as wrong because of moral values, and thus denied expression. Charles probably feels that what he identi­fies with as himself—his established values and beliefs—is threatened by what he senses beyond the door. Whatever threatens our T or ego is often felt to be evil, even if it is natural urges.

The unbalanced and real evils in the world, such as terrorising of individuals and minority groups, can of course be shown as the feeling of evil.

Example: %I am lying on the floor in my bedroom with a towel over me. I am trying to hide and protect myself because I am terrified. There are four devils trying to get into my body and take over. My bedroom is going like a whirlpool around me, like evil all around me. I wake in a hot sweat and am terrified to go back to sleep’ (Joanna). Joanna is most likely in conflict with her sexuality—the bedroom. When we fight with our own urges they often feel like external agencies—evil forces—attacking us. Sometimes refers to repressed emotional pain. See aboriginal; devil under archetypes. See also active/ passive. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Hall

Public or dance hall: how you relate to groups or the public; meeting sexuality, a place of initiation, maturing be­yond old habits, ways of life and views—perhaps because civic ceremonies such as marriage, trials, social rewards, take place in hall-like environments.

Hallway: the way one meets other people or allows them into one’s life or intimacy, the receptive female reproductive function, connecting link with aspects of oneself. Example: ‘I find myself in the entrance hall of a very large house.

The hall is very large with curved staircases at either side meeting at the top to form a balcony. There is nobody about and I am frightened. I stan to walk up the stairs but then find myself hiding in the roof with very little space above my body’ (Mrs B).

The hall is probably Mrs B’s childbearing ability and her image of herself as a woman.

The words ‘little space above my body’ suggest her main area of life has always been her childbearing function or physical attractiveness as a woman, and she had not developed her mental self. See also corridor; white under colour. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Husband

Depicts how you see the relationship with your husband; your relationship with your sexuality; sexual and emotional desire and pleasure; how you relate to intimacy in body, mind and spirit; habits of relationship developed with one’s father.

Example: ‘My recurring dream—some disaster is happen­ing. I try to contact the police or my husband. Can never contact either. I try ringing 999 again and again and can feel terror, and sometimes dreadful anger or complete panic. I cry, I scream and shout and never get through! Recently I have stopped trying to contact my husband. I managed once to reach him but he said he was too busy and I would have to deal with it myself. I woke in a furious temper with him and kicked him while he was still asleep’ (Mrs GS).

The husband here depicts Mrs S’s feelings of not being able to get through’ to her man. This is a common female dream theme, possibly arising from the husband not daring to express emotion or meet his panner with his own feelings.

For Mrs S this is an emergency. Although the dream dramatises it, there is still real frustration, anger, and a break in marital communica­tions.

Example: There were three of us. My husband, a male friend and 1, all nding small white enamel bikes. My husband proceeded slowly, first, with his back to us. Then my friend followed. Suddenly my friend ahead of me turned and gazed fully at me. He gave a glonous smile which lit up the whole of his face. I felt a great sense of well-being surge through me’ (Joan B).

The triangle: the example shows typical flow of feeling towards another male.

The other male here depicts

Joan’s desire to be attractive to other men. This is a danger signal unless one fully acknowledges ihe impulse.

Example: ‘I was with my husband and our three children. About 2 or 3 yards to our right stood my husband’s first wife —she died about a year before I first met him. I remember feeling she no longer minded me being with him, so I put my arms around him from the back, and felt more secure and comfortable with him’ (Mrs NS).

The first wife: the dreamer is now feeling easier about her husband’s first relationship.

The first wife represents her sense of competing for her husband’s affections, even though his ‘first woman’ was dead.

Example: ‘My dead husband came into my bedroom and got into bed with me to make love to me. I was not afraid. But owing to his sexual appetites during my married life with him I was horrified, and resisted him with all my might. On wak­ing I felt weak and exhausted.

The last time he came to me I responded to him and he never came back again. This hap­pened three times.

The last time I don’t think it was a dream. I was not asleep. I think it was his ghost’ (GL). Dead hus­band: in any experience of an apparently psychic nature, we must always remember the unconscious is a great dramatist. It can create the drama of a dream in moments. In doing so it makes our inner feelings into apparently real people and ob­jects outside us. While asleep we lightly dismiss this amazing process as a dream’. When it happens while our eyes are open or we are near waking, for some reason we call it a ghost or psychic event. Yet the dream process is obviously capable of creating total body sensations, emotions, full visual impres­sions, vocalisation—what else is a dream? On the other hand, the dream process is not dealing in pointless imaginations. Many women tend to believe they have little sexual drive, so it is easier for GL to see her drive in the form of her husband. But of course, her husband may also depict how she felt about sex in connection with his ‘sexual appetites’.

It is a general rule, however, that our dream process will dramatise into a past life, or a psychic’ experience, emotions linked with trauma or sexual drive which we find difficult to meet in the present.

Example: ‘I dreamt many times I lost my husband, such as not being able to find the car park where he was waiting, and seeing him go off in the distance. I wake in a panic to find him next to me in bed. These dreams persisted, and then he died quite suddenly. He was perfectly healthy at the time of the dreams and I wonder if it was a premonition of me really losing him’ (Mrs AD). Cannot find husband: many middle aged women dream of ‘losing’ their husband while out with him, perhaps shopping, or walking in a town somewhere. Sometimes the dream ponrays him actually killed. Mrs AD wonders if her dream was a premonition.

It is more likely a form of practising the loss, so it does not come as such a shock.

The greatest shocks occur when we have never even considered the event—such as a young child losing its mother, an event it has never practised, not even in fantasy, so has no inbuilt shock absorbers. As most of us know, men tend to die before women, and this information is in the mind of middle-aged married women. Mrs AD may have uncon­sciously observed slight changes in her husband’s body and behaviour, and therefore readied herself.

Other woman’s husband: one’s own husband, feelings about that man, desire for a non-committed relationship with less responsibility. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Individuation

One of Carl Jung s most interesting areas of thought is that of individuation. In a nutshell the word refers to the processes involved in becoming a self-aware human being.

The area of our being we refer to when we say T, ‘me’ or ‘myself’ is our conscious self awareness, our sense of self, which Jung calls the ego.

The autobiography of Helen Keller has helped in understanding what may be the difference be­tween an animal and a human being with self awareness. Helen, made blind and deaf through illness before learning to speak, lived in a dark unconscious world lacking any self awareness until the age of seven, when she was taught the deaf and dumb language. At first her teacher’s fingers touch­ing hers were simply a tactile but meaningless experience. Then, perhaps because she had leamt one word prior to her illness, meaning flooded her darkness. She tells us that ‘noth­ingness was blotted out’. Through language she became a person and developed a sense of self, whereas before there had been nothing.

The journey of individuation is not only that of becoming a person, but also expanding the boundaries of what we can allow ourselves to experience as an ego. As we can see from an observation of our dreams, but mostly from an extensive exploration of their feeling content, our ego is conscious of only a small area of experience.

The fundamental life pro­cesses in one’s being may be barely felt. In many contempo­rary women the reproductive drive is talked about as some­thing which has few connections with their personality. Few people have a living, feeling contact with their early child­hood, in fact many people doubt that such can exist. Because of these factors the ego can be said to exist as an encapsulated small area of consciousness, surrounded by huge areas of ex­perience it is unaware of.

In a different degree, there exists in each of us a drive towards the growth of our personal awareness, towards greater power, greater inclusion of the areas of our being which remain unconscious.

A paradox exists here, because the urge is towards integration, yet individuation is also the process of a greater self differentiation. This is a spontaneous process, just as is the growth of a tree from a seed (the tree in dreams often represents this process of self becoming), but our personal responsibility for our process of growth is neces­sary at a certain point, to make conscious what is uncon­scious.

Because dreams are constantly expressing aspects of indi­viduation it is wonh knowing the main areas of the process. Without sticking rigidly to Jungian concepts—which see indi­viduation as occurring from mid-life onwards in a few individuals—aspects of some of the main stages are as fol­lows. Early babyhood—the emergence of self consciousness through the deeply biological, sensual and gestural levels of experience, all deeply felt; the felt responses to emerging from a non-changing world in the womb to the need to reach out for food and make other needs known. Learning how to deal with a changing environment, and otherness in terms of rela­tionship.

Childhood—learning the basics of motor, verbal and social skills, the very basics of physical and emotional indepen­dence. One faces here the finding of strength to escape the domination of mother—difficult, because one is dependent upon the parent in a very real way—and develop in the psyche a satisfying sexual connection. In dream imagery this means, for the male, an easy sexual relationship with female dream figures, and a means of dealing with male figures in competition (father); see sex in dreams.

The dream of the mystic beautiful woman precedes this, a female figure one blends with in an idealistic sense, but who is never sexual.

The conflict with father—really the internal struggle with one’s image of father as more potent than self—when re­solved becomes an acceptance of the power of one’s own manhood. Women face a slightly different situation.

The woman’s first deeply sensual and sexual love object—in a bonded parent-child relationship—was her mother. So be­neath any love she may develop for a man lies the love for a woman. Whereas a man, in sexual love which takes him deeply into his psyche, may realise he is making love to his mother, a woman in the same situation may find her father or her mother as the love object. In the unconscious motivations which lead one to choose a mate, a man is influenced by the relationship he developed with his mother, a woman is influ­enced by both mother and father in her choice. Example: ‘I went across the road to where my mother’s sister lived. I wanted to cuddle her and touch her bare breasts, but we never seemed to manage this. There were always interruptions or blocks.’ (Sid L).

At these deep levels of fantasy and desire, one has to recog­nise that the first sexual experience is—hopefully—at the mother’s breast. This can be transformed into later fantasies/ dreams/desires of penis in the mouth, or penis in the vagina, or penis as breast, mouth as vagina.

For most of us, however, growth towards maturity does not present itself in such primi­tively sexual ways, simply because we are largely unconscious of such factors. In general we face the task of building a self image out of the influences, rich or traumatic, of our experi­ence. We leam to stand, as well as we may, amidst the welter of impressions, ideas, influences and urges, which constitute our life and body. What we inherit, what we experience, and what we do with these creates who we are.

One of the major themes of individuation is the journey from attachment and dependence towards independence and involved detachment. This is an overall theme we mature in all our life. In its widest sense, it pertains to the fact that the origins of our consciousness lie in a non-differentiated state of being in which no sense of T exists. Out of this womb condi­tion we gradually develop an ego and personal choice. In fact we may swing to an extreme of egotism and materialistic feel­ings of independence from others and nature.

The observable beginnings of this move to independence are seen as our at­tempt to become independent of mother and father. But de­pendence has many faces: we may have a dependent relation­ship with husband or wife; we may depend upon our work or social status for our self confidence; our youth and good looks may be the things we depend upon for our sense of who we are, our self image. With the approach of middle and old age we will then face a crisis in which an independence from these factors is necessary for our psychological equilibnum.

The Hindu practice of becoming a sanyassin, leaving behind family, name, social standing, possessions, is one way of meeting the need for inner independence from these in order to meet old age and death in a positive manner. Most people face it in a quieter, less demonstrative way. Indeed, death might be thought of as the greatest challenge to our identifica­tion with body, family, worldly status and the external world as a means to identity. We leave this world naked except for the quality of our own being.

Meeting oneself, and self responsibility, are further themes of individuation.

The fact that our waking self is a small spot­light of awareness amidst a huge ocean of unconscious life processes creates a situation of tension, certainly a threshold or ‘iron curtain’, between the known and unknown.

If one imagines the spotlighted area of self as a place one is standing in, then individuation is the process of extending the bound­ary of awareness, or even turning the spotlight occasionally into the surrounding gloom. In this way one places together impressions of what the light had revealed of the landscape in which we stand, clues to how we got to be where we are, and how we relate to these. But one may remain, or choose to remain, largely unconscious of self.

The iron curtain may be defended with our desire not to know what really motivates us, what past hurts and angers we hide. It may be easier for us to live with an exterior God or authority than to recognise the ultimate need for self responsibility and self cultivation.

To hide from this, humanity has developed innumerable escape routes—extenonsed religious practice, making scapegoats of other minority groups or individuals, rigid belief in a political system or philosophy, search for samadhi or God as a final solution, suicide. This aspect of our matunng process shows itself as a paradox (common to maturity) of becoming more sceptical, and yet finding a deeper sense of self in its connec­tions with the cosmos. We lose God and the beliefs of humanity’s childhood, yet realise we are the God we searched for. This meeting with self, in all its deep feeling of connec­tion, its uncertainty, its vulnerable power, is not without pain and joy. Example: ‘On the railway platform milled hundreds of people, all men I think. They were all ragged, thin, dirty and unshaven. I knew I was among them. I looked up at the mountainside and there was a guard watching us. He was cruel looking, oriental, in green fatigues. On his peaked cap was a red star. He carried a machine gun. Then I looked at the men around me and I realised they were all me. Each one had my face. I was looking at myself. Then I felt fear and terror’ (Anon).

The last of the great themes of individuation is summed up in William Blake’s words ‘1 must Create a System, or be en- slav’d by another Man’s; I will not Reason and Compare: my business is to Create.’ A function observable in dreams is that of scanning our massive life experience (even a child’s life experience has millions of bits of information) to see what it says of life and survival. Out of this we unconsciously create a working philosophy of what life means to us.

It is made up not only of what we have experienced and learnt in the gen­eral sense, but also from the hidden information in the cul­tural riches we have inherited from literature, music, art, the­atre and architecture.

The word hidden” is used because the unconscious ‘reads’ the symbolised information in these sources. It is, after all, the master of imagery in dreams. But unless we expand the boundaries of our awareness we may not know this inner philosopher.

If we do get to know it through dreams, we will be amazed by the beauty of its in­sight into everyday human life.

In connection with this there is an urge to be, and perhaps to procreate oneself in the world. Sometimes this is experi­enced as a sense of frustration—that there is more of us than we have been able to express, or to make real. While physical procreation can be seen as a physical survival urge, this drive to create in other spheres may be an urge to survive death as an identity. Dreams frequently present the idea that our sur­vival of death only comes about from what we have given of ourself to others. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Lucidity, Awake In Sleep

Sometimes in the practice of deep relaxation, meditation or sensory deprivation, our being enters into a state akin to sleep, yet we maintain a personal waking awareness. This is like a journey into a deep interior world of mind and body where our senses no longer function in their waking manner, where the brain works in a different way, and where awareness is introverted in a degree we do not usually experience. It can be a frightening world, simply because we are not accustomed to it. In a similar way a measure of waking awareness can arise while dreaming. This is called lucid dreaming. During it we can change or wilfully direct what is happening in the dream in a way not usual to the dream state.

Example: 4I had backed my car into a big yard, a commer­cial area. My wife, two of my sons and I got out of the car. As we stood in the yard talking I realised there was a motorbike where my car should be. I said to everyone, “There was a car here a moment ago, now it’s a motorbike. Do you know what that means? It means we are dreaming.” Mark my son was now with us, and my ex-wife. I asked them if they realised they were dreaming. They got very vague and didn’t reply. I asked them again and felt very clearly awake’ (William V). William’s is a fairly typical lucid dream, but there are features which it does not illustrate. During the days or weeks prior to a lucid dream, many people experience an increase in flying dreams.

The next example shows another common feature.

Example: In many of my dreams I become aware that I am dreaming. Also, if anything unpleasant threatens me in the dream I get away from it by waking myself (Alan). Lucidity often has this feature of enabling the dreamer to avoid un­pleasant elements of the dream.

The decision to avoid any unpleasant internal emotions is a common feature of a per­son’s conscious life, so this aspect of lucidity is simply a way of taking such a decision into the dream. Some writers even suggest it as a way of dealing with frightening dreams. Avoid­ance does not solve the problem, it simply pushes the emo­tion deeper into the unconscious where it can do damage more surreptitiously. Recent findings regarding suppressed gnef and stress, which connects them with a higher incidence of cancer, suggests that suppression is not a healthy way of dealing with feelings.

Another approach to lucidity is that it can be a son of playground where one can walk through walls, jump from high buildings and fly, change the sofa into an attractive lover, and so on. True, the realisation that our dream life is a differ­ent world and that it does have completely different principles at work than our waking world is imponant. Often people introven into their dream life the morals and fears which are only relevant to being awake in physical life.

To avoid a charging bull is cenainly imponant in waking life. In our dream life, though, to meet its charge is to integrate the enor­mous energy which the bull represents, an energy which is our own but which we may have been avoiding or running away’ from previously. Realising such simple differences revolutionises the way we relate to our own internal events and possibilities.

To treat lucid dreams as if they offered no other attainable expenence than to manipulate the dream en­vironment, or avoid an encounter, is to miss an amazing fea­ture of human potential.

Example: ‘In my dream I was watching a fern grow. It was small but opened out very rapidly. As I watched I became aware that the fern was simply an image representing a pro­cess occurring within myself which I grew increasingly aware of as I watched. Then I was fully awake in my dream and realised that my dream, perhaps any dream, was an expres­sion of actual and real events occurring in my body and mind. I felt enormous excitement, as if I were witnessing something of great importance’ (Francis P).

It is now acceptable, through the work of Freud, Jung and many others, to consider that within images of the dream lie valuable information about what is occurring within the dreamer, perhaps unconsciously. Strangely, though, it is almost never considered that one can have direct perception into this level of internal ‘events’ with­out the dream. What Francis describes is an experience of being on the cusp of symbols and direct perception. Consider­ing the enormous advantage of such direct information gath­ering, it is surprising it is seldom mentioned except in the writings of Corriere and Han, The Dream Makers.

Example: After defining why I had not woken in sleep recently, i.e. loss of belief, I had the following experience. I awoke in my sleep and began to see, without any symbols, that my attitudes and sleep movements expressed a feeling of restrained antagonism or irritation to my wife. I could also observe the feelings were arising from my discipline of sexual­ity. Realising I did not want those feelings I altered them and woke enough to turn towards her’ (Francis P). After the first of his direct perception dreams, Francis attempted to use this function again, resulting in the above, and other, such dreams. Just as classic dream interpretation says that the dream symbols represent psychobiological logical processes which might be uncovered by dream processing, what we see in Francis’ lucidity is a direct route to self insight, and through it a rapid personal growth to improved life experience. Such dreams provide not only psychological insight, but very fre­quently a direct perception of processes occurring in the body, as the following example illustrates.

Example: ‘Although deeply asleep I was wide awake with­out any shape or form. I had direct experience, without any pictures, of the action of the energies in my body. I had no awareness of body shape, only of the flow of activities in the organs. I checked over what I could observe, and noticed a tension in my neck was interfering with the flow and ex­change of energies between the head and trunk. It was also obvious from what I could see that the tension was due to an attitude I had to authority, and if the tension remained it could lead to physical ill health’ (Tony C).

An effective way to develop lucidity is frequently to con­sider the events of waking life as if they were a dream. Try to see events as one might see dream symbols. What do they mean in terms of one’s motivations, fears, personal growth? What do they suggest about oneself? For instance a person who works in a photographic darkroom developing films and prints might see they were trying to bnng to consciousness the latent—unconscious—side of themselves.

A banker might feel they were working at how best to deal with their sexual and personal resources. In this way one might actually apply what is said in this dream dictionary to one’s outer circumstances.

The second instruction is, on waking, at a convenient mo­ment, imagine oneself standing within one’s recent dream. As you get a sense of this dream environment, realise that you are taking waking awareness into the dream. From the standpoint of being fully aware of the dream action and events, what will you now do in and with the dream? Re-dream it with con­sciousness.

For example the things you run from in your nor­mal dreaming you could now face. See dream processing for fun her suggestions. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Nightmares

Many dreams lead us to feel an intensity of emotion we may seldom if ever feel in waking life.

If the emotions felt are frightening or disgusting we call the dream a nightmare. One of the common features of a nightmare is that we are desperately trying to get away from the situation; feel stuck in a terrible condition; or on waking feel enormous relief that it was just a dream. Because of the intensity of a nightmare we remember it long after other dreams; even if we seldom ever recall other dreams, even worry about what it means.

As so many dreams have been investigated in depth, using such varied approaches as hypnosis, exploration of associa­tions and emotional content, and LSD psychotherapy, in which the person can explore usually unconscious memories, imagery and feelings, we can be certain we know what night­mares are. They arise from six main causes.

Unconscious memories of intense emotions, such as those arising in a child being left in a hospital without its mother. Example: see second example in dark.

Intense anxiety produced—but not fully released at the time—by external situations such as involvement in war scenes, sexual assault (this applies to males as well as females, as they are frequently assaulted). Example: ‘A THING is marauding around the rather bleak, dark house I am in with a small boy.

To avoid it I lock myself in a room with the boy.

The THING finds the room and tries to break the door down. I frantically try to hold it closed with my hands and one foot pressed against it, my back against a wall for leverage. It was a terrible struggle and I woke myself by screaming’ (Terry F). When Terry allowed the sense of fear to arise in him while awake, he felt as he did when a child—the boy in the dream—during the bombing of the Second World War. His sense of insecurity dating from that time had emerged when he left a secure job, and had arisen in the images of the nightmare. Un­derstanding his fears, he was able to avoid their usual paralysing influence.

Childhood fears, such as loss of parent, being lost or abandoned, fear of attack by stranger or parent, anxiety about own internal drives.

Many nightmares in adults have a similar source, namely fear connected with internal drives such as aggression, sexuality and the process of growth and change, such as encounter with adolescence, loss of sexual characteristics, old age and death. Example: see third example in doors under house, buildings.

Serious illness. Example: ‘I dream night after night that a cat is gnawing at my throat’ (male from Landscapes of the Night).

The dreamer had developing cancer of the throat. These physical illness dreams are not as common as the other classes of nightmare.

Precognition of fateful events. Example: My husband, a pilot in the RAF, had recently lost a friend in an air crash. He woke one morning very troubled—he is usually a very positive person. He told me he had dreamt his friend was flying a black jet, and wanted my husband to fly with him.

Although a simple dream, my husband could not shake off the dark feelings. Shortly afterwards his own jet went down and he was killed in the crash’ (Anon.).

Understanding the causes of nightmares enables us to deal with them.

The things we run from in the nightmare need to be met while we are awake. We can do this by sitting and imagining ourselves back in the dream and facing or meeting what we were frightened of. Terry imagined himself opening the door he was fighting to keep closed. In doing this and remaining quiet he could feel the childhood feelings arising. Once he recognised them for what they were, the terror went out of them.

A young woman told me she had experienced a recurring nightmare of a piece of cloth touching her face. She would scream and scream and wake her family. One night her brother sat with her and made her meet those feelings de­picted by the cloth. When she did so she realised it was her grandmother’s funeral shroud. She cried about the loss of her grandmother, felt her feelings about death, and was never troubled again by the nightmare.

The techniques given in dream processing will help in meeting such feelings. Even the simple act of imagining ourselves back in the nightmare and facing the frightening thing will begin the process of changing our relationship with our internal fears. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Paralysis

Example: ‘It starts as a dream, but I gradually become aware that I cannot move.

The harder I try to move the worse it gets and I become very fnghtened. I can neither move nor wake myself up. Sometimes I feel as if I am leaving my body. But to deal with the fear I have learnt—it’s a recur­ring thing—to stop struggling, knowing that I will eventually wake’ (Susan Y). This is a common experience which may be due to the fact the body is paralysed during periods of the dream process; all brain signals to the voluntary muscles are inhibited. This is not sensed as a problem if we are uncon­sciously involved in a dream.

If enough self awareness arises in the dream state, then awareness of the inability to move may occur, along with the anxiety this can arouse. Another factor is illustrated by what Susan says—the harder she tries to move the worse it gets. Our unconscious is very open to suggestion.

If this were not so we would lack necessary sur­vival responses. In a dimly lit situation we may mistake a shape for a lurking figure. Our body reactions, such as heart­beat, react to the mistake as if it is real, until we gain fresh information. Whatever we feel to be real becomes a fact as far as our body reactions are concerned.

The fear that one cannot move becomes a fact because we believe it. When Susan re­laxes, and thereby drops the fear of paralysis, she can be free of it. This applies to anything we feel is true—we create it as an internal reality. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Penis

For a man the penis represents more than simply his sexual appetite. It depicts the whole drive of life through his glandular system which develops the body type he has, pre­disposes his body towards male sexual characteristics; brings a cenain creative explosiveness to his personality, creates urges towards fatherhood and loving his woman, with con­nected desires to supply the needs of family if he is emotion­ally healthy.

The positive aspect of the penis/masculinity is for him to demand his woman meets his maleness, his canng aggression, his sexual desire, with her own fiery energy and strength. In general, direct reference to sexual feelings, fears, or problems. As these can be quite complex several examples are given below.

Example: ‘So for the third time I held the woman and made love.

The woman’s vagina was like a flower, I don’t mean to look at, but in physical sensation. My penis felt like it was penetrating petals of flesh and touching with great plea­sure a central receptive area I was left with the feeling of being able to make love again and again without any negative effects. It was a very positive and healthy feeling’ (John T). John is feeling confident about his sexual drive. Although a powerful drive, subtle feelings and fears have an intense influ­ence not only on the pleasure of sex, but also the response of the physical organs.

The relationship with the penis and sex act in one s dream shows what fears, hurts or attitudes are influencing the sexual flow. See castration.

In a woman’s dream, one’s relationship with, desire for, a mate; relationship with one’s own male self—ambition, work capability, aggression, intellect; depicts the relationship with, genital sexuality with, one’s panner. As with Sally in the next example, the events in the dream define the problem or rela­tionship. Example: ‘My lover Terry, myself and another woman are all on our bed.

The other woman seemed very sure of herself and kissed Terry in a very intimate way, he doing the same to her as I lay very near to both of them. Then Terry stuck his bottom in the air and staned to lick my chest and breast. I found myself licking around the penis, felt I was under some kind of pressure from both the other two to do so but didn’t feel too shattered as I did it with love for Terry, but I had a bitter taste in my mouth’ (Sally P). In talking about this dream Sally said she often struggled with what she wanted and what her panner wanted in sex. She might go along with his needs, but not find it palatable. Even if she did do it with some love, it might have a bad taste in her mouth*.

Example: T felt as if I were as one with Terry and I realised he was trying to make a journey into his mother s vagina, as his penis. Her vagina looked like a long dark tunnel and was threatening to him. I said, “You haven’t given your mother satisfaction and you say you will not.” Then he was really smashed up in body. Withdrawing into a garden with a high green hedge. I took a leaf from the hedge and began to pull it apan with my hands. Terry said, “Look what you are doing, teasing me.” I felt withdrawal wasn’t the way and staned to follow him, walking alongside the hedge. I said, “It feels like you are strangling me, so why don’t you do it and kill me?” (We have been going through a lot of sexual withdrawal, Terry saying his sexuality was his to do with as he wanted.)(Sally P). This second dream of Sally’s is a shrewd summing up of Terry’s sexual fears. In fact Terry suffered a great deal of anxi­ety about sex, and later uncovered the son of fear and desire to avoid giving his mother satisfaction in becoming a full blooded man shown in the dream. Our unconscious is a very capable psychologist, and while Terry in Sally’s dream repre­sents her insights regarding him—and must not be seen as a statement of fact about Terry—such insights are often enor­mously useful in dealing with relationship difficulties.

Example: ‘Was in a house with my wife. Outside the door was something which wanted to come into her—an invisible being. We were frightened and it said “Do not be afraid, I want you to put your penis in your wife and wait for me to activate you. In that way you will form a body for me.” I woke and realised the dream was moving me to parenthood. Al­ready having three children I realised this would mean an­other 20 years of responsibility. Nevertheless my wife and I made love. Two weeks later I dreamt my wife was pregnant with a son. In fact nine months later she bore a son’ (Nigel I). In this interesting dream sequence the penis is Nigel’s drive to be a father. See castrate; bed; knob; pole; reptiles; sausage; examples in flower and tunnel. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Rape

Example: \ tried to turn but my legs were like lead.

The man caught me and I fought. He tried to rape me but couldn’t do it. As I talked to him I began to feel sorry for him and not frightened. I realised that inside he was a nice person. In the end I found I liked him so much I began to kiss him myself (Mrs JB). Rape in dreams is very different from rape in real life, as we create our own dream, so why introduce rape? Perhaps in the above example Mrs JB discovers her own power in the situation as she realises the weakness of the male.

Example: A man is trying to make love and at the last moment I repel him as I know it will cause a pregnancy. When I was about 10 I was raped and for many years had a fear of men’ (Anon.). This is the other side of rape. Rape in this dream may be memories, the effects of which are still visible in the life of this dreamer, causing her difficulties in warm sexuality.

Example: The devil attacked a woman. He was invisible.

The woman turned black as he raped her. She didn’t die. At this point I woke and went to the toiler. On returning to bed I continued the dream, particularly wondenng what I was in conflict with in the image of the devil. I found it disturbinr and frightening to be confronted by such a powerful oppo­nent. Partly because of the rape, I realised it was repressed sexuality. I then approached the “black” woman with tender­ness and this transformed the devil into available sexual or emotional energy. I tried this again and again. Each time it worked, and I could observe the devil was my sexual warmth and love which had become negative through restraint’ (Neil V). In this male dream, it is the conflict with his sexuality which causes the devilish’ rape. When he can find tender­ness, the negative aspect disappears. Rape also depicts the real evil of another person disregarding our personal needs and feelings, abusing not only the body, but particularly the ‘person’. Being raped by someone known: feeling anxious about sex with them, fighting off desire for them. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Recurring Dreams

If we keep a record of our dreams it will soon become obvious that some of our dream themes, charac­ters or places recur again and again. These recurrences are of various types.

A cenain theme may have begun in childhood and continued throughout our life—either without change, or as a gradually changing series of dreams. It might be that the feature which recurs is a setting, perhaps a house we visit again and again, but the details differ. Sometimes a senes of such dreams begin after or dunng a particular event or phase of our life, such as puberty or marriage.

Example: ‘This dream has recurred over 30 years. There is a railway station, remote in a rural area, a central waiting room with platform going round all sides. On the platform mill hundreds of people, all men I think. They are all ragged, thin, dirty and unshaven. I know I am among them. I looked up at the mountainside and there is a guard watching us. He is cruel looking, oriental, in green fatigues. On his peaked cap is a red star. He carries a machine gun. Then I looked at the men around me and I realise they are all me. Each one has my face. I am looking at myself. Then I feel fear and terror (Anon.).

The theme of the dream can incorporate anxious emotions, such as the above example, or any aspect of experi­ence. One woman, an epileptic, reports a dream which is the same in every detail and occurs every night. In general such dreams recur because there are ways the dreamer habitually responds to their internal or external world. Because their attitude or response is unchanging, the dream which reflects it remains the same.

It is noticeable in those who explore their dreams using such techniques as described under dream pro­cessing that recurring themes disappear or change because the attitudes or habitual anxieties which gave rise to them have been met or transformed.

A recurring environment in a dream where the other fac­tors change is not the same. We use the same words over and over in speech, yet each sentence may be different.

The envi­ronment or character represents a particular aspect of oneself, but the different events which surround it show it in the changing process of our psychological growth. Where there is no such change, as in the examples above, it suggests an area of our mental emotional self is stuck in a habitual feeling state or response.

Some recurring dreams can be ‘stopped’ by simply receiv­ing information about them. One woman dreamt the same dream from childhood. She was walking past railings in the town she lived in as a child. She always woke in dread and perspiration from this dream. At 40 she told her sister about it.

The response was ‘Oh, that’s simple. Don’t you remember that when you were about four we were walking past those railings and we were set on by a bunch of boys. Then I said to them, ‘Don’t hurt us, our mother’s dead!” They left us alone, but you should have seen the look on your face.’ After realis­ing the dread was connected with the loss of her mother, the dream never recurred. Another woman who repeatedly dreamt of being in a tight and frightening place, found the dream never returned after she had connected it to being in the womb.

Recurring dreams, such as that of the railings, suggest that pan of the process underlying dreams is a self regulatory (homocostatic) one.

The dream process tries to present trou­blesome emotions or situations to the conscious mind of the dreamer to resolve the trauma or difficulty underlying the dream.

An obvious example of this is seen in the recurring nightmare of a young woman who felt a piece of cloth touch her face, and repeatedly woke her family with her screams. Her brother, tiring of this, one night woke her from her screams and made her talk about her feelings. His persistence gradually revealed that she associated the cloth with the burial shroud of her grandmother. This brought to the surface grief and feelings about death she had never allowed herself to feel before.

The nightmare never returned. See nightmares; dream processing. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Red

Example: ‘An old woman with a very pink, lined face, and wearing a clashing red hat, knelt close to my face.

The woman leaned forward to poke my hand, and I recoiled, screaming myself awake (Joy S). Even where red appears quite casually in a dream, as with the hat in the example, there is frequently fear, screaming, horror or a sense of danger in the same dream. Less frequently, red represents blood, menstruation; the biological life force; conception; death. Red face: anger; high emotion. Red bnck building : homeliness, warmth. Red furniture or decor plush; richness. Red flowers: love, passion, dangers of passion. Red clothes or motif: sexu­ality, passion; strong emotions. Red and grey together : emo­tions connected with depression. Rose pink, love. Pale pink: baby feelings; weakness. Idioms: see red; in the red; red car­pet; red light district; red faced. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Reptiles, Lizards, Snakes

Our basic spinal and lower brain reactions, such as fight or flight, reproduction, attraction or repulsion, sex drive, need for food and reaction to pain. This includes the fundamental evolutionary ability to change and the urge to survive—very powerful and ancient processes. Our relationship with the reptile in our dreams depicts our relat- edness to such forces in us, and how we deal with the im­pulses from the ancient pan of our brain.

Modern humans face the difficulty of developing an inde­pendent identity and yet keeping a working relationship with the primitive, thus maturing/bringing the primitive into an efficiently functioning connection with the present social world.

The survival urge at base might be kill or run, but it can be transformed into the ambition which helps, say, an opera singer meet difficulties in her career. Also the very primitive has in itself the promise of the future, of new aspects of human consciousness. This is because many extraordinary human functions take place unconsciously, in the realm of the reptile/spine/lower brain/right brain/autonomic nervous sys­tem. Being unconscious they are less amenable to our waking will. They function fully only in some fight or flight, survive or die, situations.

If we begin to touch these with consciousness, as we do in dreams, new functions are added to conscious­ness. See The dream as extended perception under ESP and dreams.

frog

Unconscious life or growth processes which can lead to transformation (the frog/prince story); the growth from child­hood vulnerability—tadpole to frog—therefore the process of life in general and its wisdom. Frogspawn: sperm, ovum and reproduction.

lizard

Example: ‘My wife and I saw a large lizard on the wall near a banana. It was there to catch the flies.

The lizard turned so it was facing away from us—head up the wall. We then were able to see it had large wing-like flaps which spread from its head in an invened V. With amazement we saw on these flaps wonderful pictures, in full colour, of birds. In fleet­ing thoughts I wondered if the bird “paintings” were to attract birds, or were some form of camouflage. But I felt cenain the lizard had “painted” these wonderful pictures with its uncon­scious an’ (David T). Generally, a lizard is very much the same as a snake, except it lacks the poisonous aspect; aware­ness of unconscious or instinctive drives, functions and pro­cesses. In the above dream, the banana is both David’s plea­sure and sexuality, while the lizard is the creativity emerging from his unconscious through the attention he is giving it—he is looking at the lizard. Chameleon: either one’s desire to fade into the background, or adaptability.

snake

Example: A small snake about a foot long had dropped down my shirt neck. I could feel it on the left side of my neck Fearing it was poisonous and might bite me, I moved very slowly. At one point I put my head on the ground, hoping the snake would wish to crawl away. It did not. Then I was near an elephant I loved, and hoped it would remove the snake. It did not. Even as I slept I felt the snake was an expression of the attitude of not shanng myself with anybody except family’ (David T).

For months prior to the above dream David had experienced a great deal of neck pain. After dis­cussing the dream with his wife, and realising much of his thinking and feeling was intumed, the pain disappeared. So the snake was both poisoner’ and ‘healer’. This may be why snakes are used as a symbol of the medical profession.

The Hebrew word for the serpent in the Garden of Eden is Nahash, which can be translated as blind impulsive urges, such as our instinctive drives.

So, generally, snakes depict many different things, but usu­ally the life process.

If we think of a person’s life from con­ception to death, we see a flowing moving event, similar in many ways to the speeded up films of a seed growing into a plant, flowering and dying.

The snake depicts the force or energy behind that movement and purposiveness—the force of life which leads us both to growth and death. That energy —like electricity in a house, which can be heat, power, sound and vision—lies behind all our functions. So in some dreams the snake expresses our sexuality, in others the rising of that energy up our body to express itself as digestion—the intesti­nal snake; as the healing or poisonous energy of our emotions and thoughts.

Example: ‘I was in a huge cathedral, the mother church. I wanted to go to the toilet/gents. As I held my penis to urinate it became a snake and reached down to the urinal to drink. It was thirsty. I struggled with it, pulling it away from the un­clean liquid. Still holding it I walked to a basin and gave it pure water to drink’ (Bill A). Here the connection between snake and sexuality is obvious. But the snake is not just Bill’s penis.

It is the direction his sexual urges take him he is strug­gling with. Out of his sense of love and connection with life— the cathedral—he wants to lift his drive towards something which will not leave him with a sense of uncleanness. Snake in connection with any hole: sexual relatedness.

A snake biting us: unconscious worries about our health, frustrated sexual impulse, our emotions turned against our­selves as internalised aggression, can poison us and cause very real illness, so may be shown as the biting snake. Snake biting others: biting remarks, a poisonous tongue.

A crowned or light-encircled snake: when our ‘blind impulses’ or instinctive or unconscious urges and functions are in some measure inte­grated with our conscious will and insight, this is seen as the crowned snake or even winged snake. It shows real self awareness and maturity. In coils of snake: feeling bound in the ‘blind impulses’ or habitual drives and feeling responses. Instincts and habits can be redirected, as illustrated by Hercu­les’ labours. Snake with tail in mouth: sense of the circle of life—binh, growth, reproduction, aging, death, rebirth; the eternal. Snake coiling up tree, pole, cross: the blind instinctive forces of life emerging into conscious experience—in other words the essence of human expenence with its involvement in pain, pleasure, time and eternity; the process of personal growth or evolution; healing because personal growth often moves us beyond old attitudes or situations which led to inner tension or even sickness. Snake in grass: sense or intuition of talk behind your back; danger, sneakiness. Colours: green, our internal life process directed, perhaps through satisfied feelings, love and creativity, into a healing process or one which leads to our personal growth and positive change; white, eternal aspect of our life process, or becoming con­scious of it; blue, religious feelings or coldness in relations. See colours; anxiety dreams; death and rebirth, the self under archetypes; dreams and Ancient Greece; cellar under house, buildings; hypnosis and dreams; jungle; paralysis. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Sex

in dreams Although sex is symbolised in many dreams, where it appears directly it shows that the dreamer is able to accept their sexual urges and hurts more easily. What is then imponant is to attempt an understanding of what setting or drama the sexual element occurs in. Our psychological and sexual natures, like our physical, never stand still in develop­ment unless a pain or problem freezes them at a particular level of maturity. Therefore our sexual dreams, even if our sex life is satisfactory, show us what growth, what new challenge, is being met.

Example: My lover was standing behind me, and John, my husband, was standing in front of me. I was asking John to have sex with me and at the same time thinking, “Oh, hell, if he does he will think we have something going between us.” I felt no flow towards John but felt somehow I was trying to tell my lover that I was desirable’ (Sally A). Sally’s dream needs no interpretation. Such clear dreams show that Sally is ready to be directly aware of what she is doing in her relationships.

If the sex in the dream is deeply symbolised, it suggests the dreamer is less willing to be aware of their motivations or connected painful feelings. Even though Sally’s dream was clear, it was still dealing with an area of her sexuality she was not clearly conscious of.

If she had been aware, it is doubtful whether she would have dreamt it.

Example: ‘I was in a farmyard.

A small boy climbed all over the bull. It became terribly angry. It had been chained without attention too long. Now it tore away and sought the cows.

The gates were closed, but the bull smashed through the enclosing fence. I rushed to the fence and sat astride it, but on seeing that the bull smashed it like match wood, I looked around for some safe place.

The bull charged the first cow to mount it, but so terrible was its energy and emotion that it could not express as sex. It smashed the cow aside as it had done the fence. Then it rushed the next and tossed it over its head, charging and smashing the next. I climbed into somebody’s garden, trying to get out of the district’ (Arthur J). Although this dream depicts Arthur’s chained’ sexual drive using the bull, it is still fairly obvious.

If we consider the setting and plot of the dream, as suggested above, we see that Arthur is desperately trying to avoid responsibility for, or try­ing to escape, his own sexual drive—figuratively ‘sitting on the fence’.

Example: ‘My husband and I were walking down a road. We were going in the same direction together. I started to sing with a very happy feeling but then felt I should stop because he would say the happiness was because I had had sex. I sensed he knew what I was thinking as I walked along. He then quietly began to sing and the dream ended with me smiling to myself. We had sexual cut off for four weeks but had made love that afternoon’ (Joan W). In talking about this dream Joan said she felt it slightly embarrassing to admit that sex gave her feelings of happiness. She liked to believe she was perfectly happy without it.

It is probably out of the slight conflict between her conscious attitude and her feeling of well-being after sex that the dream was produced. See ani­mals; adolescent; affair; devil, Christ, Shadow under arche­types; bag; banana; bed; example in bite; black person; breasts and penis under body; bud; candle; cane; castration; ceremony, ritual; clothes; compensatory theory; cuckoo; cup; dam; dance; third example in danger; defence mecha­nisms; dragon; drum; emotions, mood; ejaculation; second example under evil; founh example under husband in family; feelings; homosexuality; horns; hostility; example in door under house, buildings; hypnosis and dreams; insects; jun­gle; kiss, left, right; lift; second example under light; man; masturbation; mirror; murder; nest; oval; pole; prostitute; purse; rape; refrigerate; religion and dreams; first example under reptiles; sadism; sex while asleep; wordplay, puns. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Sex While Asleep

Example: Many times in my adult life I have woken to find I have made love to my wife while asleep. Or I wake to discover myself in the middle of the sexual act. At such times I have usually been avoiding my sexual drive and it has burst through to fulfil itself while I was asleep or under the sway of dreams.

For instance most times this hap­pened I have been in the middle of a dream in which there is a sense of absolute imperative that I must make love/have sex.

It is like being lost in a storm of glamour and fantasy or vision in which I am totally involved.

The whirl of the “dream” is towards the wonder, totality of the need to have sex. As this imperative is expressed in my still spontaneous, dreaming physical action, the experience of sex is also visionary and enormous’ (Charles W).

This fairly common dreaming experience demonstrates powerfully how dreams are an expression of a self regulatory or compensatory action in the psyche and body. Charles says that he had been restraining his sexual activity. This shows the enormous gulf which can exist between what we will to do as a conscious personality, and what our being needs to do or wishes to do outside conscious decision making.

The ‘glamour and fantasy’ Charles describes are regular features of how these deeper needs make themselves known, or attempt to coerce the conscious mind, into fulfilling the need.

If we reject the fantasy, the unconscious processes will attempt a more radical approach, as in actual physical movement while we sleep. This may have given rise to ideas about possession or devils in past ages, when it was not understood that we can split our mind by such conflicts. Fear of the possessing’ influ­ence actually heightens its power through suggestion.

It is much better to understand what one’s needs are, and seek an acceptable fulfilment. See abreaction. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Spiral

Things we repeat over and over, like habits; move­ment towards greater awareness or insight.

Example: We walk around, go upstairs, and I notice a staircase leading to a room or rooms.

The stairs are painted in the green too, and they go up square, about eight steps in a flight, but round and round—spiral. I am scared by them, don’t want to go up, but am curious. We move in and nobody but myself has really taken any notice of the stairs. Nobody has been up. Half way up I can see there is a glass roof, the wooden frames painted green. I am terrified but have to go on. Then I wake. Next dream I got up there. It smelt very musty. Lots of draw sheets covering things. I bent to lift a sheet. It was raining. I could hear it thrashing on the glass. Then I woke (Ann H). In this example we have the spiral and the square combined in the stairs. In this way the dream manages to combine many different ideas such as climbing to the un­known, spiralling or circling something, and the squareness or down-to-eanh nature of what is being discovered. There arc things we have learnt, yet not realised consciously. Like a jigsaw puzzle, we have all the pieces, and we sense the con­nection, but we have never formed it into a conscious thought or verbal idea. It therefore remains as a feeling sense or hunch, but not a rational idea. Ann is spiralling towards, or circling around, such a realisation. She is frightened because it may be difficult—one may realise that all the years of mar­riage point to having been used as a doormat. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Touching

Being aware of, becoming conscious; meeting and becoming intimate; contacting. Touching also sometimes shows a linking up with something, as when a person touches a power line and gets shocked. This suggests we have ‘touched’ feelings or drives which are a shock to us.

Example: ‘Now I sit on a bed. Near me, looking at a book I am holding is a woman I know. I realise as we talk that her foot is touching mine. As my wife is on my left across the room I feel uncomfortable about this. Now the woman has her left hand on my penis.’ (Anthony B). Often directly or indirectly sexual, as in the example.

The absence of touching in otherwise intimate scene: can suggest lack of ability to rcach out or express one’s needs for contact; a passive attitude in which you want the other person, or a more automatic aspect of oneself, to take responsibility and risks.

Active avoidance of touching: as illustrated in the following example, shows feelings of anger.

The anger may be passive, but such avoidance of contact is as vicious as hitting.

The dreamer moves towards a healthier state by expressing her anger. Example: ‘My husband came over to me with his arm out to touch me but I was so angry I put my arm up to shield myself from his touch and then began to throw things at him to express how angry I was feeling’ (Susie R).

Example: The man was so superior in his attitude, and patronisingly arrogant about the lost children, that I cursed him with a touch, saying “May you lose children of your own” ‘ (Albie G). Touching is also a means of communicating our emotions or intentions. This can be love, anger, sympathy or, as with Albie. a statement which attempts to break down insularity. Albie’s dream also shows another aspect of touch­ing, which is its use to produce a change. Albie wanted to leave a mark, make a change in the man, who is an aspect of himself. Idioms: get in touch; keep in touch; lose touch, lose one’s touch, out of touch, touch and go, touch someone, touched up, touch something off, touch upon, common touch; Midas touch; touch bottom; soft touch, touch wood. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Trapped

Example: ‘After our first baby was born I had such nightmares my doctor gave me a tranquilliser to take before going to sleep. I have taken one at bedtime for 36 years! I am too afraid not to take it. But I still have dreams’ (Margaret S-W). Although this is not a dream about being trapped, Mar­garet is trapped by fears which she never faces. Such fears can stay with us a lifetime, so it is much more economical and satisfying to meet the difficulties they represent. In a dream, Margaret’s fears might be represented by a trapped dream, such as the next example.

Example: I am trapped in a small brick room with no way out. I shout for someone to help me. Then either a huge bird or creature with arms tries to catch me and I scream myself awake’ (Karen S). Karen had lived through a divorce, an un­happy love affair, the loss of a baby. In the dream the figure who comes after she has called for help might save her, but her fears make her reject it. Perhaps Karen’s feelings about men paint them as monsters. Whatever her past males may have been like, with such feelings it is Karen herself who is the prisoner and suffers loneliness. Trapped dreams can also depict feelings we have about work, about lack of opportunity, and so on. It must be remembered that the dream puts into images one’s own feelings about the situation, not the external thing itself. See imprisoned; cage; cell; wolj under animal; escape; holding. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Wanting

Wanting is a primal drive which, through social­isation, we may crush and thereby lose contact with what we want from our own feelings and needs. In doing so we may also lose much of our decisiveness and creativity.

Example: ‘1 still want him all to myself. We never touch or kiss or anything in the dreams, and I want him to, but would never let on I wanted this. I am a bit coy in my dreams’ (Pauline B). Pauline is dreaming about a past lover whom she has tried to forget, but when we pick out the wants’ we see how strong her feelings are. Looking at dreams in this way helps us define what our desires are.

Example: The older man still wanted something from me. I didn’t want to be involved with him at all and yet had to be polite, etc., so he wouldn’t hit out at me/us. We needed some kind of contact with this man, I lent forward and kissed him on his face and drew back quickly as I didn’t want to give any more than that, I had a fear that he would want more’ (Sandra O). Sandra had divorced an older husband, and was living with a younger man.

The complication of her wants’ is shown in the dream. When it is a ‘don’t want’ in the dream, it is helpful to change it to a positive. ‘I didn’t want to go with my mother’ could become ‘I wanted to do my own thing.’

Because what we want is complex and often in conflict, our dream characters may want something which we oppose, as in the following example. Example: To escape from a man chasing me, I decided I must get a taxi home. Got in one driven by a woman who wanted to take me to the man who was chasing me. Woke up sweating’ (Ann G).

The urge to integrate the male pan of herself, seen as the taxi driver, is in conflict with Ann’s fear of it. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Water

Emotions, moods and flow of feeling energy. Because of the nature of water it lends itself to depicting aspects of how we relate to emotions; for instance, one can drown’ in or feel swept away by some emotions, at other times we can feel cleansed and refreshed. It also represents our potential to ex­perience many emotions because water can take any shape or move in so many ways. How we relate to the water shows how we are meeting our emotions and moods.

Example: ‘I am in deep water, no evidence that it is the sea. I am wearing my heavy brown coat. I have no fear, no feeling of cold and I pleasantly just sink’ (Mrs B). Mrs B is in her 80s, and is preparing for death in her dreams.

The water in her dream has the feeling of being womblike, suggesting that she senses death as a return to a womblike feeling state, with possible rebirth.

Example: ‘I was then standing in front of a senes of glass water tanks. I had apparently written an article about the balance between intellect and emotion, which had presented emotion in a way to show its equal value with intellect.

The tanks had water flowing through them with a series of valves. This demonstrated the different relationships between intel­lect and emotion. Some tanks were beautifully clear and col­ourful, showing the right balance.

The unbalanced ones had weed growing in them. I was then in a lift with a young woman. We moved close together and kissed. This moved my feelings so much I felt a great melting feeling in my abdomen, and a lot of body sensation against her body’ (Anthony F). Anthony’s dream perfectly illustrates how water refers to the emotions and flowing body feelings.

Example: ‘I was in a hospital ward—maybe for children. I was there to help them. In the ward was a large oblong tank full of water. I got into the water. I realised all the sick people in the ward bathed in the water—not soap, just immersion. This produced feelings of revulsion. I felt I would take into myself their sickness. I also thought that if I drank the water it would show the patients a positive attitude towards their sick­ness. They would no longer be afraid, and this would be a factor in their healing’ (Anthony F). Another of Anthony’s dreams in which he is looking at how to meet anxious feelings about his health. He sees that a more positive conscious atti­tude heals the childhood fears.

Entering water: entering into strong feelings such as might arise in a relationship or new job, sexual relationship, emo­tions which might stand in one’s way—as a deep lake might, or turgid water. Deep water: the deeps of one’s inner life. Hot water: strong emotions—see example in Introduction. Elec­tricity and water: emotions which can generate very powerful reaction to a situation, such as jealousy or anger. Idioms: make water, muddy the waters; tread water, water something down; turn on the waterworks; water under the bridge; hold water, in hot water, head above water; pour cold water onto something. See fluid; river; rain.

water creatures See fish, sea creatures. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Word Analysis Of Dreams

Having written a dream down, by using highlighting pens to make all matching words the same colour, one can immediately see the main issues in some dreams.

Example: ‘We walk around, go upstairs, and I notice a staircase leading to a room or rooms. It goes up square, about eight steps in a flight, but round and round—spiral. I am scared by them, don’t want to go up, but am curious. We move in and nobody but myself has really taken any notice of the stairs. Nobody has been up . In one dream I try to go up but the children are scared for me. They plead, ‘Don’t go up Mum, just forget them”. Then I wake. In the next dream I wait till they are asleep. Half way up_ I am terrified but have to go on. Then I wake. Next dream I got up there. Then I woke’ (Ann H). Ann’s dream theme recurs, so is important to her. In marking just some of the words we see that the ‘up’ or go up’ is important. Childhood fears hold Ann back for a while, but she dares to climb.

If we look at the entries for climb and stairs, we see they depict taking steps towards ex­ploring the unknown, daring to explore one’s potential or opportunities.

By marking the words in this way we might also highlight certain statements otherwise hidden in the dream. Particularly watch out for the connections with the word T, such as I want, I do, I will, I have, I know, I cannot, etc. Example: ‘1 want to withdraw.’ I was full of sadness but was trying not to show it.’ ‘1 felt keyed up and ready to fight.’ Taking such statements out of context and looking for connections with everyday feelings oi situations often throws considerable light on the dream.

If what you realise is then considered in con­nection with the plot of the dream, the viewpoint your uncon­scious has on the situation might become evident.

For in­stance, the statement ‘I felt keyed up’ occurred within a classroom, and helped the dreamer understand the anger gen­erated at school. See amplification; plot of the dream; the comments on dream processing in the Introduction; dream processing; postures, movement, body language; settings; symbols and dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Highway

On life’s journey, are you moving along fast, or are you stuck in a traffic jam? Are you rushing or taking a leisurely trip? As a traffic symbol, as in Driving a Car and Auto, it almost always has sexual undertones. Is the highway crowded (I must defend myself against many rivals) or is it empty (I am going my own way)? Are there any complications during the trip, like accidents, breakdowns, or difficult traffic situations? This would always correspond to problems in the present.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

Betrayal

We dream of disappointment and anger when we have been let down in life or our trust has been betrayed in some way.

If you dream of your partner committing adultery explore your own feelings of vulnerability and insecurity. In dreams we project onto other characters our own issues so if this dream theme occurs ask yourself “where am I betraying myself and ignoring my own needs?”... The Premier in Dream Dictionary

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The Premier in Dream Dictionary

Eagle

General Meaning: A picture of the Holy Spirit and His ability to protect us and do warfare on our behalf.

Dreams Positive:

There are so many positive connotations for the eagle, that you might have many of your own in addition to this book.

• My favorite is a personal revelation the Holy Spirit gave me concerning hiding in the shadow of His wings.

• I saw myself standing alone, facing the many attacks and pressures that I am used to facing daily. Then I saw a huge eagle come and stand behind me and extend its wings. As it stood behind me, I was covered by its shadow.

• When I stood alone, I looked very small when others looked at me. But when that eagle was behind me, the size of His very shadow made them stop dead in their tracks! • Alone I was helpless, but as I stood in His shadow, they saw His magnificence, and so I was protected! • Psalms 63:7 Because you have been my help, therefore in the shadow of your wings I will rejoice.

• Here is another passage that describes the Lord as an eagle: • Deuteronomy 32:11 As an eagle stirs up her nest, flutters over her young, spreads abroad her wings, takes them, bears them on her wings:

Negative:

In a negative light, an eagle can also speak of destruction.

The eagle is a bird of prey, and it tears that prey apart with its powerful beak and claws.

• Here is a passage that indicates that an eagle in a vision or external dream, can indicate destruction and an attack from the enemy: • Habakkuk 1:8 ...and their horsemen shall come from far; they shall fly as the eagle [that] has to eat.

See also: Birds, Dove.... The Way of Dreams and Visions

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The Way of Dreams and Visions

Rope

General Meaning: Rope, like chain, speaks of bondage and of being restricted. In a positive context though, it is a picture of strength and security.

(As in the threefold cord that cannot be broken) • Positive: To dream of being tied to your spouse or to someone you love speaks of unity with the Lord.

• A ship is tied to the dock with a rope, representing security.

• A threefold cord speaks of strength and unity. It can be a very positive thing if it is tying a couple together in marriage.

• I recall a vision when my husband Craig and I were receiving ministry about being married. Apostle Les saw a vision of us tied together with strong ropes that could not be broken.

• Because my parents had been divorced, I feared the same thing in my own life.

The Lord made me a strong promise that I had nothing to fear. I am glad to say that our marriage is going stronger than ever! • With my husband, myself and the Lord, we are a picture of a threefold cord that could not be broken.

• Ecclesiastes 4:12 And if a one is overwhelmed, two can stand together; a threefold cord is not quickly broken.

Negative: To dream of having your hands tied is a picture of being restricted and unable to do the things you need to do.

• Being tied by rope to something could also indicate that you are being bound by whatever that object or person represents in your dreams.

• Being bound by a rope can speak of the work of the enemy to bind you and prevent you from doing what the Lord wants you to do, just like Delilah bound Samson.

• Judges 15:13 ...And they bound him with two new cords, and brought him up from the rock.

• A rope attaching you to someone else could speak of a spiritual bond that needs to be broken. In the spirit, you might see a person tied with cords that are in turn attached to various people.

• If the people you see are family members, then that rope is a picture of generational bondage.

• You can also see this in relation to past mentors or friends that you have not fully let go yet.

If you see this vision, then the Lord is telling you to let those people go and to move on.

• For more on how to break spiritual links, read The Way of Blessing. See also: Cords, Chains.... The Way of Dreams and Visions

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The Way of Dreams and Visions

Do Your Dreams Have A Meaning?

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter. The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us. A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general. In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‘one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm’), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2] As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction. The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated. To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject. But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature -- for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked. In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds: I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‘research workers on dreams’, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‘Les savants ne sont pas curieux’, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it! And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes: Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‘interpretation of dreams’ is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

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About Dream Interpretation

Do Your Dreams Mean Anything?

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems

I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter.

The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us.

A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general.

In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‰_÷one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm‰_ª), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2]

As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction.

The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated.

To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject.

But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature - for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked.

In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds:

I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‰_÷research workers on dreams‰_ª, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‰_÷Les savants ne sont pas curieux‰_ª, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it!

And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes:

Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‰_÷interpretation of dreams‰_ª is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

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About Dream Interpretation

10 Common Dreams

TEETH

My most popular requests for dream interpretation are by far, dreams about teeth falling out. Apparently this is quite disturbing to people who have this dream...they simply MUST know what it means! In my experience, a dream about one’s teeth falling out usually symbolizes that the dreamer is having a challenge getting their voice heard, or feelings acknowledged. This may be referring to their conversations with a particular person such as their significant other, boss or friend; or can be generalized for people who are shy; to include almost everyone they come in contact with. The dreamer needs to brush up on conversational skills, believe in the value of their own opinion, learn how to be less intimidated by aggressive people, and become more assertive in making their voice heard. Once they do that, this dream (which is a common recurring dream) should evolve, show improvement or disappear altogether.


PEOPLE

Every person that appears in a dream is supposed to represent an aspect of One’s Self, and not actually be about that other person at all. Rather, it is a quality or characteristic about that person that your dream is focusing on, and how it applies to YOU.

Try to think about what aspect(s) this could be. It can be something you admire and wish to follow or incorporate into your own personality. It could be a more negative characteristic that you may dislike intensely in your waking life, but which is telling you something about yourself and your beliefs, judgments or attitude. It could be a call to alter your thinking in some manner, in order to be more open-minded and accepting of this aspect in others and your own personality, because it is hampering your spiritual growth & making life harder for yourself. The other person in your dream is always mirroring something back to you about YOURSELF.

Try to discover what that something is, and go from there. Once you get it through your head that the other person’s appearance in your dream is NOT about them, but really about YOU, then you will be much more successful interpreting your own dreams. This takes constant reinforcing - I still find myself wanting to think it’s about that other person instead of me.

FLYING

usually represents freedom from the physical body, as we experience in sleep & while dreaming where we don’t use our physical bodies but instead use our mental & spiritual bodies to experience our dreams. Everybody seems to have a natural inclination to want to fly, unless that is changed by a fear of flying due to a frightening incident in his or her waking lives. Flying = freedom. This could mean a desire for freedom, an “escape” from restraints in your physical life (like a mini-vacation for the mind) or any number of possibilities. Tie it in with the context of your dream...what were you doing in your dream besides flying? How did it make you feel? Also, the type of flying I’m referring to here is the person flying on their own without an airplane or any aircraft at all. Airplanes & other aircraft are different symbols dealing with spiritual awareness, among other things.


SCHOOL

This type of dream relates to your current “lesson in life,” and if you learn how to interpret it, you’ll find out how you are progressing...yes, folks, you’re still taking tests and getting graded! Our “true selves” are our souls, and not our physical bodies. You are a spirit / soul having a physical dream, not the other way around. Ever feel like your life is like a play, and you are acting out some role that you don’t even understand, even surprising yourself with your actions sometimes? Bingo! When we sleep, that proverbial “Veil of Forgetfulness” that prevents us from “cheating on the test” is lifted, and we are shown what type of progress we are making (or, GULP, not making) and given guidance on what to do next. We always have free will in our waking physical lives, though.

If we stubbornly refuse to finish our tests, then we have that right - but we are doomed to repeat it until we pass it. And each time we turn away from the test, the next time it will be more unpleasant until finally we are forced to acknowledge it’s importance for our growth. The things we consider vitally important in our waking physical lives are not nearly as important as the TRUE reason we are here, which is to overcome our shortcomings so that we may get closer to our Source / God / Higher Power. To avoid learning the lesson is like forcing your soul to a fate similar to the mythical Greek god named Sisyphus who was doomed to keep rolling a boulder uphill for eternity, only to watch it roll back down & have to repeat the same tedious hard chore again & again. That sounds like school to me! So pay attention to the messages in dreams about schools, and you may advance faster. Do you really want to repeat kindergarten again?


CAR or VEHICLE

This is supposed to symbolize you in your waking life, in your physical body. Your physical body is used by the soul pretty much like we use a car...it’s driven for awhile and we give it gas / nourishment & repairs as needed until it stops running, and then we go back home. Pay attention to your car, which symbolizes your physical body. Are you behind the wheel, or is someone else in control? You want to be in charge of your life, naturally. What is the color & condition of this vehicle? Do you seem to be driving it the right way, on a safe road in good condition, or is the road rocky, winding, or suddenly ends at a cliff? That would signal that you need redirection. The bigger the vehicle, the more energy you may be successfully using for your daily lessons, depending on the context of your dream. Note all clues as to how you are faring, and make adjustments accordingly.


HOUSE

You drive a car, but typically you LIVE in a house/apartment. Dreams about a house symbolize a larger aspect of your Self, and the aspects of self, which make us whole. Each room is said to symbolize a different aspect of your Self, for example:

An Attic symbolizes your Higher Self, and your spiritual development & progress. Look at other symbols in the attic of your dream, and try to evaluate what they mean. Also pay attention to the feeling(s) you experience in your dream...is it serious, enlightening or what, exactly? All these things are clues for you.

A Bathroom would symbolize the need for cleansing / purging / elimination of something in your life that isn’t quite working, or that has served it’s purpose and now it’s time to move on.


A Kitchen would symbolize the need or act of supplying nourishment or food for the body / mind / soul...whatever is currently “cooking” or developing in your life.

If the food is plentiful, you have what you need.

If the cupboard is bare, time to go shopping for new nourishment, and you need to figure out what is needed for that “shopping list.”

A Dining Room is similar to the kitchen, but has more to do with immediate needs for supplying & utilizing nourishment, and less with the preparation or taking stock of those needs.

The Main Room or Living Room symbolizes your daily interactions with others, and often you will have other people appearing in your dreams in this room. Remember, they represent aspects of YOUR Self, and not themselves.

(See PEOPLE, above)

Bedrooms symbolize the unconscious mind aspect of your self, rest, dreams, sometimes and sexuality issues in your life.

The Upstairs symbolizes your spiritual awareness aspect of self, or the Higher Self that holds all the keys or knowledge to this life’s role you are acting out, and always has your higher good looked after, no matter how it might seem otherwise.

The Downstairs / Basement symbolizes your subconscious mind / aspect of self, which deals with habits, old coping skills, self-regulation, ego.

That’s usually the part of our Selves that makes us feel “torn” between knowing we should do one thing, and inexplicably ending up doing the opposite.

(Don’t you HATE that?)

Old belief patterns & fears have to be corrected, if that is the case. Tackle & overcome it, and you will feel much more peaceful about your life.

The Ground Floor of a house represents your daily agenda; what’s currently going on in your life.

Revisiting Old Houses from Childhood or Earlier Times: this points to issues that probably are resurfacing in your current life, and need to be looked at, analyzed, and healed so you can move forward and not backward.

If you find yourself repeating the same old tired mistakes, or dealing with the same old tired fears, chances are you will have this dream.

A Hallway symbolizes that you have reached an area that is necessary to journey through in order to get to the other side, and it may be a narrow path that has to be traversed with care and awareness.

If you have that “closed in, claustrophobic feeling” then you need to expand your awareness/open your mind to more possibilities for completing this phase of your journey.

TORNADO

This symbol points to emotional turmoil, as in a “whirlwind of emotions”; and / or rapid or sudden changes in your life.

It is a sign to “get a grip” on what is possibly spinning out of control & deal more effectively with your emotions. Meditation and finding some private “thinking time” for yourself might be a good idea.


COLORS

Pink: the color of love in all its forms. Often used to show healing through love.

Red: passion or anger.

Black: the unconscious mind; void; death of the old.

Grey: fear or confusion. White: truth, “coming clean,” purity; can also be symbolic of death & new beginnings.

Green: healing, growth, newness.

Blue: spirituality; could be a metaphor for “being blue” (look at context of dream).

Yellow: peacefulness, hope (as in “sunny disposition”); could be a cowardice metaphor.


NUMBERS

I am not a numerologist, but I will put a few basic numbers here

One: unity, completeness.

Two: balance of yin-yang principles, or male / female energies-either it’s needed or it’s achieved.

Three: (common dream symbol) the trinity of the Father, Son & Holy Spirit, and the 3 principles uniting in harmony, as in body-mind-spirit harmony. This dream has an important spiritual message for you - pay attention!

Five: changes!


BABY or PREGNANCY

Newness or creation in your life, a new aspect of self is being formed and coming into being!... Common Dreams

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Common Dreams

Sacrifice

(1) If you are being sacrificed in the dream, there are at least three possibilities.

The dream may be drawing your attention to a martyr complex, habitual and compulsive self-punishment, self-denial or self-denigration. Such negative conditioning can be got rid of only by reconditioning, by making positive affirmations every day: for example, ‘I love myself dearly5, ‘I accept myself totally5, ‘I have a unique value5, and ‘I desen e all the good things life offers me.5

Your unconscious may be telling you it is time to let the old you die, to make way for the new and truer you. The self-image you have accepted and conformed to in the past is probably too lopsided and needs to be supplemented by utilizing capacities or qualities that have till now lain dormant; or it may have led you completely astray from your true self, in which case it needs to be removed altogether.

Perhaps the dream is expressing a feeling that you are being abused or undervalued by other people.

(2) Arc you doing the sacrificing? If so, what is being sacrificed will usually represent some aspect of vour personality - desire, ambition, habit, prejudice - that you have given up or are being urged (by your unconscious) to give up. (If an animal is being slain, it will probably symbolize an instinctual impulse or emotion.) This is one of many cases where you have to decide whether a dream is descriptive or prescriptive: showing what you have done (and asking you to stop doing it), or showing what you ought to do. You should have no difficulty in

knowing whether you have done what the dream depicts.

If you have, the dream is asking you not to do it.

If you have not done it, the dream is asking you to do it, for the sake of personal fulfilment.

It is important to remember that sacrifice is meant to be creative: it is the giving up of something in order to achieve and enjoy something better. And if you think ‘better’ has nothing to do with enjoyment but means simply what duty requires, then you need to remember that making a sacrifice either resentfully or merely for duty’s sake is bound to be destructive in its effects both on you and on those you are in relationship with.

It is also important to remember that ‘To everything there is a season... a time to seek, and a time to lose; a time to keep, and a time to cast aways (Ecclesiastes 3:1, 6). There comes to us all a time for transcending animality (e.g. making sex a vehicle for love and adoration) but to attempt such things before the proper time can only breed resentment and end in disaster. Your dreams will tell you the time!

(3) Is your act of sacrifice a violent one? If so, it would suggest that some (partly unconscious) mechanism of self-punishment is at work in you and you urgently need to ask yourself why you feel guilty. Almost certainly the cause will lie in early childhood and will be an entirely innocent desire.... A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

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A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

Burial

Although dreaming of your own funeral is really unpleasant, the meaning that lies behind this image is positive. It indicates that you must move away from the past and look to the future. In contrast, dreaming of someone else’s burial announces that, probably, a radical change is about to happen in your life. Something has come to an end and you have to forget about it; or in other words you need to bury it. When it comes to the funeral of a loved one, it shows that you should not cling to your possessions. Dreaming that you are buried alive warns you against a mistake you are about to make; your opponents will use it to harm you.

If you are saved from this situation your efforts will correct the mishap over time. (See CEMETERY and DEATH)

BURIAL - analysis of the dream

Joseph dreamed: “I was sitting in front of a black coffin, surrounded by strangers who were weeping and mourning the death of... I did not know who it was. I felt no sorrow, no pain, but the fact of not knowing who we were burying made me anxious, and still I did not dare to ask. Suddenly, I noticed that the coffin was open and I just had to get up from my chair to see noticed that the coffin was open and I just had to get up from my chair to see inside. My surprise was great when I saw myself dressed as a clown with a stupid grin on my face.”

Dreams about death announce changes or the end of a phase. Before this dream Joseph was a joker... too much! His friends and coworkers were always berating his heavy and tasteless jokes; however, he did not seem willing to change. Joseph took a few days to understand the message of his dream; a few months before, a friend of his had had a really hard time because of his jokes. The dream was announcing to Joseph a change of attitude, it was warning that: “If you do not want to lose all your friends and end up surrounded by strangers—like in the dream—you better bury your joker side.” After this, he knew he had to give way to a more staid Joseph and, of course, it was not fair that others will have a hard time because of his inappropriate attitude.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

Door

It is a beautiful symbol full of meaning, especially if it is opening. In that case, it generally represents personal development and desire to explore your inner world, or it suggests that you are about to cross the threshold of a new life stage or to begin an important new project.

If in the dream they shut the door in your face, you may have the feeling of being excluded or ignored by others.

If you are not able to open it, it is a reminder that, right now, you should not try to alter the situation in which you are.

If the door is too narrow you may have to give up some of your demands in order to succeed. For Freud, this dream has a clear sexual reading: door represents the vagina. Consequently, if it is narrow it is a symbol of sexual difficulties, and the act of opening and closing it continuously is a clear allusion to intercourse.

The doorknob predicts unexpected good luck; its hinges, family problems. A closed door predicts lost opportunities; an open one, fortune; a revolving one, the arrival of a monotonous period; and a trapdoor, shocking news.

DOOR - analysis of the dream

Mireia dreamed: “I dreamed I was in a dark hallway surrounded by rooms on either side. Hanging on the walls there were old portraits of people who seemed to follow me with their eyes. I was terrified. I knew it was a test and needed to choose a door and walk through it, but I was afraid to be wrong; I was afraid that if I chose wrong I could fall into the void. Suddenly, one of the doors opened. I decided to go in. I found myself on a light and airy corridor; at the end I could see another golden door. I walked toward it, this time without fear and with confidence that something wonderful was waiting for me inside. I opened it, confident, and realized it was in my own room. I felt safe and calm but very tired. I laid on my cozy bed and gave myself up to a peaceful sleep. Then I woke up.”

Mireia’s dream reflects a very specific time in her life when she had to make important decisions that would affect her future. Her company had offered her a promotion that involved a transfer across the world: Australia. The dark and gloomy corridor reflects the situation at the moment of her dream, full of doubts and fears. The ancient portraits of people who seemed to be looking at her signal the pressure she was under. However, the door opening represented the opportunity that fate was offering to her; suggesting that she was about to cross the threshold of a new phase of her life.

The golden gate was the confirmation that her decision to leave would be the right one. Her unconscious was encouraging her to accept it. The fact that the door led her to her own room is a message that she did not have be afraid of changes, because home was also waiting for her over there.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

Flying

Imagining that you are flying signals the arrival of change that will be very beneficial for you. The action of flying, however, implies the desire to evolve, to connect with the essence of yourself to progress spiritually. Further, it denotes that you have undone something that was worrying you.

It is a dream from which you leave with optimism and renewed strength, with a stimulating sensation of liberty. It also indicated the need to discover, to invent, and to do new things. This type of image foretells success, the completion of objections and overcoming difficulties, and encourages the dreamer to action (it is the time to fly by one’s self). However, you should not forget the Greek myth from Icarus; he who tried to go too high, his ambition brought him to a fatal destination. Further, if the protagonist is a young woman, it announces the break from relations in her couple.

In antiquity, if a person dreamt of flying, it was considered that he had entered into the sphere of the immortal gods. The Native Americans, the Babylonians, the Hindus, the Tibetan Buddhists, and many other peoples believed that the world had the ability to abandon the physical body during sleep. During these astral voyages, the psychic body could fly to other dimensions, communicate with people of a certain spiritual belief or learn of the souls that once were angels and divinities. Some scientists believe that these voyages are factual and that there exists the possibility to verify them empirically.

Flying

analysis of a dream

Montse dreamed: “I discovered with astonishment that I could fly. I just had

Montse dreamed: “I discovered with astonishment that I could fly. I just had to move three steps ahead and push myself a little forward; I didn’t even have to swing my arms. The wind marked my direction and I was able to feel the incredible sensation, I felt happy, free, powerful... Around me there were no birds, nor sounds; I was on my own in the immensity of the blue sky, flying over a sea in calm blue, yet brighter. Suddenly, I saw a group of dolphins jumping joyfully over silver waves. I awoke smiling, with a very pleasant sensation.”

Dreaming that you are flying is associated with liberty, the desire to elevate yourself from the earthly bindings and conquer the heaviness of reality.

It is a dream of evolution, which reveals you need to freely express yourself, to create... Montse, by profession a designer, had this dream a few days before completing a design for an important magazine, very artistic and vanguardist, renowned with many awards... A few days before she had felt very pressured and tired; however, her dream calmed her and revealed her creative capacity and her strength of expression. Dolphins are a symbol of intelligence that s related to clarity and purity of thought. The face that there were jumping through the water (entering and leaving) indicated the level of connection Montse had established between her conscious and subconscious.

Dreams of flights also match an interest in spiritual evolution. Curiously, through this period, Montse had given some tries in this direction, with courses on growth and personal overcoming, in which she learned much about herself.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

Forest

The forest symbolizes the unconscious, anxieties, instincts, and secret passions.

If it is accompanied by a sense of peace, completeness, or exuberance, it indicates that you are self-confident and proud of your personality. But if you feel fear and anxiety, or if you get lost in the forest, it is a sign of fear, repression, and complexes. On the other hand, birds and animals found in the forest represent your instincts and emotions. Finally, if you dream of being in a dark forest and try to find the way back, it denotes that you want to take a decisive step in life.

The plot of many fairy tales like Hansel and Gretel and Snow White takes place in the forest. Like dreams, these stories symbolize the exploration of the unconscious. According to an esoteric interpretation, to get lost in a forest is an omen of alterations; to hide in it, of impending disasters; to cross it, promise of inheritance; to go for a walk in the forest, joy. A felled forest, however, is a sign of wealth.

FOREST - analysis of the dream

Ana dreamed: “I was on my way to the office, on the same streets as always, but the smoke of the city would not let me breathe and I could barely see the path I was walking over. I suddenly found myself surrounded by a lush forest. I knew that if I followed the trail I would reach my destination, so I decided to enjoy the scenery while walking confident and happy, at a medium pace. In the dream I could identify the different species of trees and flowers. Birds were coming to me with their joyous trills. I felt full of vitality. I woke up with a very nice feeling of peace, as if I had enjoyed a comfortable vacation.”

Ana had this dream two days before she was diagnosed with a chronic respiratory condition. Besides being prophetic—the smoke of the city would not let her breathe—Ana’s dream was warning her against a need for her body: healthy and fresh air. The confident and safe walk passage reflects the Ana’s strength and the fact that the problem would be easily solved. Months later she was granted a transfer to a mountain village with a very suitable climate for her health.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

Karaoke

Being at a karaoke bar and not singing means the dreamer wants to establish more open and spontaneous relationships with others, but is too timid. On the contrary, to see yourself singing is a sign that you desire such an exaggerated starring role that you run the risk of alienating those around you from imposing your opinions. (See SINGING)

Karaoke

analysis of a dream

Rosa dreamed: “We were celebrating my birthday in a karaoke bar. At first I didn’t want to go up to sing. I know that I’m bad at it, so I was very embarrassed to go off key and that everyone would laugh at me. But my friends insisted so much that finally I felt I had to. After all, everyone was there for me. By luck, I could chose my favorite song and I began to sing the there for me. By luck, I could chose my favorite song and I began to sing the first lines and I did it really well! People clapped enthusiastically, while I followed the lyrics on the screen. I surprised myself with my voice. I was signing a really tough Mariah Carey song and I did it better than her!”

When Rosa had this dream she was very worried about an important business meeting she had scheduled the following week. She hadn’t worked at the company very long and she was worried what her bosses and colleagues would think of her. The fact that she didn’t want to sing in karaoke reveals her fear of public speaking and being judged; however, her unconscious was calming her and encouraging her to do her best.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

Swing

Psychoanalysis tend to relate the swing with auto-eroticism, and interprets the fear of rolling or of seasickness, produced by the swing, as inhibitions from childhood.

Dreaming that you swing with your partner predicts a happy marriage and a large family; if you swing alone it denotes selfishness and infidelity; and if the chain is broken a birth of a child will be coming soon. A stationary swing is indicative of intense but brief joy.

SWING - analysis of the dream

Joana dreamed: “I was ten and I swung on a swing in the park. My father pushed me and I drove myself forward strongly, stretching my legs. With my toes I could almost touch the clouds. I was happy. I felt light and powerful. Suddenly, I turned around and I no longer saw my father. I felt fear and dizziness. I called him with all my might, but he did not appear.”

Joana had this dream two days after receiving a marriage proposal. She was still undecided. She knew her boyfriend very well and was truly in love, but the idea of marriage made her feel too grown up, despite her youth—she was only 20 years old. This also made her long for her childhood. Swinging on the swing and the pleasant feeling from getting high up are related to her desire for freedom. But the fact that it was her father who pushed her and watched her closely, so that she would not fall, revealed her insecurity and her desire for protection.

In dreams, swinging yourself in the swing is also interpreted as a symbol of indecision; your issues are on the tightrope and sway from side to side without ever landing on site. Joana’s unconscious was encouraging her to be in charge of her life and to decide for herself, breaking family ties—her father disappears in the dream—and accepting her maturity.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

Leg

To see your legs in your dream suggests that you have gained enough confidence to stand up for yourself.

If your legs are weak, then you may be feeling emotionally vulnerable.

If you see the legs of someone else in your dream, this may indicate your admiration for them. Perhaps you need to adopt some of the attitudes of this person.

If your legs are wounded or crippled, this signifies an inability to stand up for yourself. Perhaps you are lacking courage and refuse to make a stand.

If one leg is shorter than another in your dream, this suggests some kind of imbalance in your life. You are placing too much emphasis on one thing and ignoring other important aspects of your life.

If you have three legs in your dream, then perhaps you have taken on too many responsibilities.

According to ancient dream lore, if you have a wooden leg in your dream, you will have many new worries. Bear in mind leg-related idioms such as: legless, didn’t have a leg to stand on, can’t stand up for myself, ball and chain on my legs.

To see thighs in your dream indicates strength and endurance, and it refers to your ability to make things happen. To dream of your knees indicates feelings of inadequacy and vulnerability. You may have taken on more than you can handle. To see your calves in your dream suggests movement and versatility, and your ability to jump from situation to situation. It can also suggest that you are involved with someone who is needy and over-dependent. To dream about your ankles indicates that you are seeking support and direction in your life. Ask yourself where you want to be headed. Bear in mind the phrase ‘Achilles heel’; could dream of heels be referring to your vulnerability or a particular weakness?... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

Famous People

If some celebrity or famous person appears in your dream, they may be there to express something about you or someone close to you.

According to Freudians, such dreams are pure wishfulfillment, with the celebrity representing either what you want to be or your desire for more recognition in waking life. By contrast, Jungians consider that dreams of celebrities represent archetypes and aspects of your personality that are still buried in your unconscious.

If so, your dreaming mind is encouraging you to incorporate those desired qualities that you see in the famous person into your conscious life, because they are already present—latent—in you. On the other hand, the famous person may represent your shadow or hidden side: a part of your personality, or a behavior pattern, that you have refused to acknowledge—for example, aggressiveness or a will to dominate.

In short, celebrities in dreams often symbolize those hidden qualities upon which you need to turn the spotlight. Whenever you dream of becoming famous, or meeting someone famous or powerful, quickly write down a couple of positives and a couple of negatives about that person. Don’t think too much.

Then ask yourself, ‘Do I see any of these qualities in myself right now? Are they qualities that I want to develop? What can I learn from the dream about myself and my life from this person?’ See also ARCHETYPES; PEOPLE.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia