Dream Interpretation Instance | Dream Meanings


Concerning the literal time schedule

Dream Dictionary Unlimited | Margaret Hamilton


Instance | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Instance

Broth

Broth denotes the sincerity of friends. They will uphold you in all instances.

If you need pecuniary aid it will be forthcoming.

To lovers, it promises a strong and lasting attachment.

To make broth, you will rule your own and others’ fate. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Ladder

To dream of a ladder being raised for you to ascend to some height, your energetic and nervy qualifications will raise you into prominence in business affairs.

To ascend a ladder, means prosperity and unstinted happiness.

To fall from one, denotes despondency and unsuccessful transactions to the tradesman, and blasted crops to the farmer.

To see a broken ladder, betokens failure in every instance.

To descend a ladder, is disappointment in business, and unrequited desires.

To escape from captivity, or confinement, by means of a ladder, you will be successful, though many perilous paths may intervene.

To grow dizzy as you ascend a ladder, denotes that you will not wear new honors serenely. You are likely to become haughty and domineering in your newly acquired position. See Hill, Ascend, or Fall.... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Pocketbook

To find a pocketbook filled with bills and money in your dreams, you will be quite lucky, gaining in nearly every instance your desire.

If empty, you will be disappointed in some big hope.

If you lose your pocketbook, you will unfortunately disagree with your best friend, and thereby lose much comfort and real gain. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Prison

To dream of a prison, is the forerunner of misfortune in every instance, if it encircles your friends, or yourself.

To see any one dismissed from prison, denotes that you will finally overcome misfortune. See Jail. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Rubber

To dream of being clothed in rubber garments, is a sign that you will have honors conferred upon you because of your steady and unchanging stand of purity and morality.

If the garments are ragged or torn, you should be cautious in your conduct, as scandal is ready to attack your reputation.

To dream of using ``rubber’’ as a slang term, foretells that you will be easy to please in your choice of pleasure and companions.

If you find that your limbs will stretch like rubber, it is a sign that illness is threatening you, and you are likely to use deceit in your wooing and business.

To dream of rubber goods, denotes that your affairs will be conducted on a secret basis, and your friends will fail to understand your conduct in many instances. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Grave

(Burial; Tomb; Sepulcher) A grave in a dream represents a prison and a prison in a dream represents a grave. Ifone sees himself living in a grave in a dream, it means that he will be incarcerated in a prison. Building a grave in a dream means building a house.

If one enters a grave but does not witness a funeral in his dream, it means that he will buy a house. Digging a grave in a dream means getting married, though through tricking the woman to get her consent. Standing over a grave in a dream means committing a sin. Ifone sees himself digging a grave and upon completing his work, ifhe discovers that what he has dug is standing on the surface of the earth and has no walls in the dream, such ground represents the abode of the hereafter.

If he then enters it in his dream, it signifies that his life term in this world has come to its conclusion.

If he does not enter it in the dream, then there are no consequences to his dream. Seeing a known grave in a dream is a proof of what is true and a sign of what will unfailingly come.

An unknown grave in a dream represents a hypocrite. Building a tomb on the roof of one’s house means longevity. Visiting the graveyard in a dream means visiting people in prison. Raining over the graves in a dream means blessings from God Almighty upon the people of the graves. Graves in a dream also represent distant travels, bewilderment, a wife, or they could mean a prison. Filling a grave with dirt in a dream means longevity and living a healthy life. Seeing oneself buried alive in a dream means a calamity, tightening of one’s means or imprisonment. Seeing oneself buried alive and wearing one’s shroud in a dream also could mean marriage.

To unearth someone’s grave in a dream means seeking to pursue his trade.

If it is the grave of a scholar, then it means wanting to acquire his knowledge.

If it is the grave of a rich person in the dream, then it means becoming rich or receiving an inheritance.

If one sees the deceased person alive in his grave in a dream, it means that such money will constitute unlawful earnings, while in the first instance, the knowledge or wisdom one is seeking will be true, except if the person in the grave is dead in the dream.

A stone tomb or a sarcophagus in a dream means profits, a war prisoner, a booty or exposing one’s personal secrets.

(Also see Burial; Cemetery; Exhume; Sarcophagus; Shrine; Tower)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Masjid

(arb. God’s House; Mosque; Place of worship) In Arabic, the word masjid means a place of prostration, while the word Jami means a place of gathering.

A masjid or a mosque in a dream represents a scholar and its gates represent men of know ledge and the guardians, or the attendants of God’s House. Building a masjid in a dream means emulating the traditions of God’s Prophet, upon whom be peace, fostering the unity of one’s family, or becoming ajudge, should one qualify for such an office.

A masjid filled with people in a dream represents a gnostic, a man of knowledge and wisdom, or a preacher who invites people to his house, advises them, brings their hearts together, teaches them the precepts oftheir religion and explains the wisdom behind the divine revelations. Seeing a masjid being demolished in a dream means that such a gnostic, or religious scholar and devout believer will die in that locality. In a dream, if the roof of a masjid caves in, it means that one will indulge in an abominable action.

If one sees a stranger performing his prayers in a masjid in a dream, it means that the Imam of that masjid will dies from a terminal illness.

If one enters a masjid in the company of a group of people, and if they dig a small hole for him inside the masjid in the dream, it means that he will get married.

If one’s house becomes a masjid in a dream, it means that he will attain piety, purity of heart, escetic detachment and an honor he will receive from his brethren. He will also call upon them to follow what is true and to abstain from what is false. Ifa masjid is transformed into a bathhouse in a dream, it means that a chaste person will turn corrupt or become heedless.

A masjid in a dream also represents a marketplace or a business. Ifone has to climb up a staircase to reach the masjid in a dream, then the masjid represents a thrifty person who does not like to share what he has.

If one has to climb down a staircase to reach the masjid in a dream, it means that his needs will be satisfied. Ifa masjid in the city is moved to a remote village in a dream, it means stagnation of one’s business, being ostracized from one’s community, or it could mean legal complications related to one’s inheritance.

If a ruler builds a house for God Almighty or a masjid in a dream, it means that he will be ajust ruler and he will govern his subject by the divine laws.

If a religious scholar builds a masjid in a dream, it means that he will author a book that will benefit others, or delivers a commentary on a complex religious issue, or if he is wealthy, it means that he will pay the alms tax due on his assets. Building a masjid in a dream also means getting married, or conceiving a child who will grow to become a righteous and a knowledgeable scholar, or if one is poor, it means that he will become rich. Otherwise, it means that one will serve God’s House and fill it with invocations, supplications, serving the interest of the community, leading the people to unity and love, and teaching them to value obedience to God’s commands. Building a masjid in a dream also could mean becoming a real estate agent, or repenting from one’s sins, or receiving guidance on God’s path, or to die as a martyr, hence, what one builds for God Almighty in a dream, represents his house in paradise. Such interpretation applies if one builds a masjid following the proper procedures and with lawfully earned money, and using proper materials. Otherwise, building it with what is unlawful of money or materials in the dream, or changing the direction ofthe prayer niche, etcetera, then one’s dream will carry the opposite meaning.

If one builds a masjid or a fellowship house in a dream, it means that he will seek the path of knowledge and wisdom, or that he will attend a pilgrimage during that same year, or establish a permanent business, such as a hotel, a bathhouse or a shop, etcetera. Building the roof of a masjid in a dream means taking care of orphans, or sponsoring homeless children. Expanding a masjid in a dream means increase in one’s good deeds, repentance from a sin, adopting good conduct, or being just. Seeing oneself inside a new masjid one does not recognize in a dream means attending the pilgrimage to God’s House in Mecca during that same year, orjoiningreligious circles to learn about one’s religion.

If one’s shop becomes a masjid, or if the masjid becomes a shop in the dream, it denotes lawful earnings, or it could mean mixing lawful and unlawful earnings.

A forsaken masjid or mosque in a dream means intentionally ignoring the value of gnostics and religious scholars, or denying the necessity to command what is good and to eschew what is evil.

A forsaken masjid in a dream also denotes the presence of ascetics who have renounced the world and its people and care less about their material possessions.

A known mosque in a dream represents the city where it is erected.

For instance, the AlUia mosque in a dream represents Jerusalem, the Sacred mosque represents Mecca, the Prophet’s Mosque (uwbp) represents Medina, the Omayyad mosque represents Damascus, Al-Azhar mosque represents Cairo and the Blue mosque represents Istanbul, etcetera.

A known mosque in a dream also could represent the renowned scholars who live in that place, or the ruler of that country, or any of his ministers.

If one enters a mosque and immediately after crossing the entrance gate, he prostrates himself to God Almighty in the dream, it means that he will be given the opportunity to repent for his sins.

If one comes to a masjid and finds its doors locked, then if someone opens the door to him in a dream, it means that he will help someone in paying his debt, then extol his good virtues in public. Ifone enters a mosque riding on an animal in a dream, itmeans that he will cut off his connection with his relatives, leave them behind and forbid them to follow him.

If one dies in a masjid in a dream, it means that he will die as a true penitent.

If the carpet or the straw mat of a mosque becomes a shredded rag in the dream, it means that the community of that masjid is divided and corrupt. Building a masjid in a dream also means overcoming one’s enemy. Entering the Sacred Mosque in Mecca in a dream means arriving with one’s bride to their new home and it could mean fulfillment of a promise, being truthful, dispelling one’s fear and reaching the shore of safety.

(Also see Minaret; Minbar; Mosque)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Treasure

(Hidden treasure; Knowledge; Wheel) Discovering a treasure in a dream means acquiring knowledge.

If one is a merchant, then it means profits from his business, or spending money generously on God’s path. Ifone is a ruler, it means expansion of his powers and it denotes his justice. Seeing a treasure in a dream is interpreted in relation to one’s type of trade.

A treasure in a dream also represents a business. Discovering a hidden trunk with little money inside it in a dream means a short lived difficulty, but if the trunk is stashed with money, then it means distress, sadness and sorrow. In many instances, discovering a treasure in a dream may mean death, or it could mean becoming rich, or complying with a court order. Discovering a great treasure in a dream means martyrdom. Discovering a treasure and rejoicing in the dream means loss of one’s money or business. Discovering a treasure in a dream also could mean ease in one’s life, receiving an inheritance, distress, trouble, wearing a new garment, a wife, cheating on one’s taxes, or it could mean avoiding to pay alms tax, or hindering the distributions of charitable endowments.

A treasure in a dream also represents a profitable business, or it could represent a money changer, a jeweler, or remembering something. Discovering a treasure that is difficult to reach in a dream represents a stingy person who hinders the distribution of charities, or if he is a scholar, it means that he does not like to share his knowledge with others, and if one is a judge, it means that he is unjust.

If a woman discovers a treasure in her dream, it means that she is careful about spending money and managing her household.

If the trunk has no cover or lid in the dream, then it means the opposite.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Guides / Guidance

A character that offers you advice or who appears to be an authority figure or just someone with a smile that may not particularly fit into dream is most likely one of your guides.

For instance you dream of coming out of an undesirable house where there are shadowy people cooking raw stakes that remain raw even after cooked and are intended for you to eat, and you are a vegetarian. Suddenly and out of context to the rest of the dream you find yourself in the outside of the house and getting onto a bus with your best friend, the bus is not moving, but you feel relieved not to be around the cooks. You specifically notice and remember the bus driver, but he/she does not seem to be playing a part of your dream subject – which is you and your friend on a bus that is not moving.

The driver is your guide here. You were taken from an unpleasant dream that you got involved with in the psychic plain by your guide and put in a protected area, the bus.

The guide realizes that things experienced in the psychic realm can be designed to cause you problems in the awaken state and even cause unpleasant physical manifestations to occur. Most likely your guide will also take an opportunity such as this to give you a message.

A guide will always be kind and loving to you or sometimes just silent but always positive.

A guide can be just a voice you hear.

The voice will be a pleasant rather than an unpleasant or frightening one. This is not to say it can’t be a stern and authoritive voice if that is what you need to get the message being given. Government-Control, internal and external law making and enforcing.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

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The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Idiot

To dream of being turned idiot and going mad augurs favor with princes, also gain and pleasure through things of the world (Artemidorus). An instance of the philosophical basis of certain interpretations.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

Muff

A dream forecasting a harsh wmter, lack of money (Gypsy). In this instance the subconsciousness has probably recorded weather signs of which the consciousness has taken no note.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

Naked

A dream of sickness, poverty, affront, fatigue. Invariably ominous according to older interpreters. Modern students, however, attribute to it a-totally different significance; holding it in some instances as a wish dream, in others as an erotic dream and again as a dream symbolizing freedom from social restraint.

The theory of the subconscious and its warnings, etc., is, however, in accord with the older school, for the dream of nakedness might readily originate in fear, especially with women who habitually devote a large amount of thought to clothes.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

Tower

To ascend a tower signifies reverses of fortune (Gypsy). Interpretation corresponds with the aversion of the Hebrews for towers, an example of which is instanced in the Tower of Babel.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

Bull

With Taureans, may depict their innate charactenstics and how they are dealing with them. Sex drive, the basic drives towards parenthood, and caring and providing via sex.

The aggressive bull often shows the frustration ansing from these basic drives being taunted or thwarted; for instance a person may wish for a family, yet be frustrated by a form ol sexuality in their partner which does not care for the instinc­tive drive for children.

The killed bull is a killing of these drives; if sacrificed, though, it may show self-giving.

The rid den bull in dreams shows a harmony between self awareness and its decision making, and the basic ‘animal’ drives. Idi­oms: like a bull at a gate, bull in a china shop, red rag to a bull; score a bull’s eye; take the bull by the horns. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Categories Of Dreams

Gnffith, Miyago and Tago give 34 types of dream themes, from falling to being hung by the neck.

For the lay dreamer it is more useful to put dreams into much broader categories such as psychological. ESP, body, sexual, spiritual and problem solving. In researching the data for this book, some special cluster of dream themes were no­ticed.

For instance a cluster was noted in women past middle age, they dreamt of walking in a town and losing their hus­band. Description of these clusters can be seen in son and husband under family; losing teeth under body; flying; secret room under house; dead people; individuation. See also dream as meeting place; dream as spiritual guide; dream as therapist and healer; sex in dreams; ESP in dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Centre, Middle

Emphasises the importance of the thing, per­son or animal in that position; conflict, where the middle is between opposites; obstruction when something might be in the middle of the road, corridor, etc.; feelings of being in­volved, when in the middle of a crowd for instance. When something is in the middle of a circle or square can represent the self. Idioms: middle of the road; piggy in the middle, centre of attention. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Doctor

Our dependence upon authority figure for a sense of wholeness, or to deal with anxiety, the healing process within us—or the unconscious wisdom we have concerning our body’s needs and well being.

The doctor might give us advice, for instance; anxiety about health; desire for intimacy or to be looked at. Idioms: doctor something, have an animal doctored; doctor the accounts. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Door

Example: 41 find my way to a door and knock.

It is at the end of a cul de sac.

An old woman of about 60 comes to the door. Although old, she is healthy and well preserved. Without a word I grab her in my arms and have sex with her’ (Patrick S). Freud felt that a door, a keyhole, a handle, a knocker, all depicted sex and sexual organs.

The example shows this clearly. Knocking refers to the sex act, the cul de sac is the woman’s legs. But the image of a door has so many other ways of being expressed in dreams and is used very frequently. In the next example it represents the experience of discovenng a new feeling state.

For instance, if one had al­ways been apologetic and now became affirmative, ‘new doors’ of expenence could well open. Example: I come up to a door which I d never seen before, and on opening it, I came across another house fully furnished’ (Mrs R F).

General meanings, depending on the dream, are a bound­ary; the difference between one feeling state and another; such as depression and feeling motivated; the feelings or attitudes, such as aloofness, we use to shut others out of our life to remain independent or private; being open or inviting; a sense of leaving an environment or relationship—escape; entering into new work or relationships. Someone at a door: opportu­nity, the unexpected; new experience. Front door: public self; confidence; our relationship with people in general; a vagina. Back door: our private, family life; our more secret activities; the anus. Side door : escaping from a situation, or being indi­rect. Shutting a door: privacy; trying to find ‘space’ for oneself, the dismissing attitudes or tension we use to shut others out of intimate contact; end of a relationship. Door to strange land­scape or world: finding entrance into unconscious. Doorknob: see knob.

Example: 4I am being strangled from behind by a faceless man! I had gone down to lock my flat door for the night when I noticed the door was open. I hastily bolted it and ran up­stairs, but unknown to me the intruder was already in the flat’ (Miss H). Here the door represents the censorship the dreamer places between her conscious self and her sexual drives. In strangling’ our own life drive, we ourselves feel cut off from life. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Analysis

Sigmund Freud was the founder of modern therapeutic analysis of dreams. Freud encouraged clients to relax on a couch and allow free associations to arise in con­nection with aspects of their dream. In this way he helped the person move from the surface images (manifest content) of the dream to the underlying emotions, fantasies and wishes (latent content), often connected with early childhood. Be­cause dreams use condensation—a mass of different ideas or experiences all represented by one dream image or event— Freud stated that the manifest content was meagre’ compared with the ‘richness and variety’ of latent content.

If one suc­ceeds in touching the feelings and memories usually con­nected with a dream image, this becomes apparent because of the depth of insight and experience which arises. Although ideally the Freudian analyst helps the client discover their own experience of their dream, it can occur that the analyst puts to the client readymade views of the dream. Out of this has occurred the idea of someone else ‘analysing or telling us about our dream.

Carl Jung used a different approach. He applied amplifica­tion (see entry), helped the client explore their associations, used active imagination (see entry) and stuck to the structure of the dream. Because amplification also put to the client the information and experience of the therapist, again the dreamwork can be largely verbal and intellectual, rather than experiential.

In the approach of Fritz Perls (gestalt therapy) and Moreno (psychodrama), dream analysis is almost entirely experiential.

The person exploring the dream acts out or verbalises each role or aspect of the dream.

If one dreamt of a house, in gestalt one might stan by saying I am a house’ and then go on to describe oneself just as one is as the particular house in the dream.

It is important, even if the house were one existing externally, not to attempt a description of the external house, but to stay with the house as it was in the dream. This is like amplification, except the client gives all the information. This can be a very dramatic and emotional experience because we begin consciously to touch the immense realms of experience usually hidden behind the image. When successful this leads to personal insights into behaviour and creativity. See dream processing; amplification; gestalt dream work.

dream as a meeting place Any two people, or group of people who share their dreams, particularly if they explore the associated feelings and thoughts connected with the dream images, achieve social intimacy quickly. Whether it is a family sharing their dreams, or two fnends, an environment can be created in which the most profound feelings, painful and wonderful, can be allowed. Such exposure of the usually pri­vate areas of one s feelings and fears often presents new infor­mation to the dreamer, and also allows ventilation of what may never have been consciously expressed before. In doing so a healing release is reached, but also greater self under­standing and the opportunity to think over or reconsider what is discovered.

Herbert Reed, editor of the dream magazine Sundance, and resident in Virginia Beach, Va., initiated group dreaming ex­periments. It started because Reed noticed that in the dream groups he was running, when one of the group aired a prob­lem, other members would subsequently dream about that person’s problem. He went on to suggest the group should attempt this purposely and the resulting dreams shared to see if they helped the person with the problem.

The reported dreams often formed a more detailed view of the person’s situation. In one instance the group experienced many dream images of water. It aided the woman who was seeking help to admit she had a phobia of water and to begin thinking about learning to swim. In another experiment, a woman presented the problem of indecision about what college to transfer to and what to study. Her group subsequently said they were confused because they had not dreamt about school. Several had dreams about illicit sex. though, which led the woman to admit she was having an affair with a married man. She went on to realise that it was the affair which was underlying her indecision. She chose to end the affair and further her career.

Whatever may be underlying the results of Reed’s expen- ments, it is noticeably helpful to use the basic principles he is working with. They can be used by two people equally as well as a group—by a parent and child, wife and husband, busi­nessman and employee. One sets out to dream about each other through mutual agreement. Like any undertaking, the involvement, and therefore the results, are much more pro­nounced if there is an issue of reasonable importance behind the experiment. It helps if one imagines that during sleep you are going to meet each other to consider what is happening between you. Then sleep, and on waking take time to recall any dream. Note it down, even if it seems far removed from what you expected. Then explore its content using the tech­niques in dream processing.

Example: My wife and I decided to attempt to meet in our dreams. I dreamt I was in a room similar to the back bedroom of my previous marnage. My present wife was with me. She asked me to help her move the wardrobe. It reminded me of, but did not look like, the one which had been in that bed­room. I stood with my back to it, and reached my hands up to press on the top, inside. In this way I carried it to another wall. As I put it down the wood broke. I felt it ought to be thrown away’ (Thomas B). Thomas explored the dream and found he connected feelings about his first marriage with the wardrobe and bedroom. In fact the shabby wardrobe was Tom’s feelings of shabbiness at having divorced his first wife. In his first marriage, represented by the bedroom, he always felt he was married for life. In divorcing, he had done some­thing he didn’t like and was carrying it about with him. He says ‘1 am carrying this feeling of shabbiness and second best into my present relationship, and I need to get rid of it.’

dream as a spiritual guide Dreams have always been con­nected with the spiritual side of human experience, even though today many spiritual leaders disagree with consider­ation of dreams. Because dreams put the dreamer in touch with the source of their own internal wisdom and certainty, some conflict has existed between authoritative priesthood and public dreaming.

A lay person finding their own ap­proach to God in a dream might question the authority of the priests. No doubt people frequently made up dreams about God in order to be listened to. Nevertheless, despite opposi­tion, Matthew still dreamt of an angel appearing to him, Jo­seph was still warned by God to move Jesus; Peter still dreamt his dream of the unclean animals.

The modern scientific approach has placed large question marks against the concept of the human spirit. Study of the brain’s functions and biochemical activities have led to a sense of human personality being wholly a series of biological and biochemical events.

The results of this in the relationship between doctor and patient, psychiatrist and client, some­times results in the communication of human personality be­ing of little consequence. It may not be put into words, but the intimation is that if one is depressed it is a biochemical prob­lem or a brain malfunction.

If one is withdrawn or autistic, it is not that there is a vital centre of personality which has for some reason chosen to avoid contact, but that a biochemical or physiological problem is the cause—it’s nothing personal, take this pill (to change the biochemistry, because you are not really a person). Of course we have to accept that human personality must sometimes face the tragedy of biochemical malfunction, but we also need to accept that biochemical and physiological process can be changed by human will and courage.

In attempting to find what the human spirit is by looking at dreams, creativity stands out.

The spiritual nature may not be what we have traditionally considered it to be.

An overview of dreams and how dreamers relate to them suggests one amaz­ing fact. Let us call it the ‘seashell effect’. When we hear sounds in a shell that we hold to our ear, the noises heard seem exterior to oneself, yet they are most likely amplification of sounds created in our own ear, perhaps by the passage of blood. Imagine an electronic arcade machine which the player could sit in and, when running, the player could be engulfed in images, sounds, smell and sensation. At first there is shim­mering darkness, then a sound, and lights move. Is it a face seen, or a creature. Like Rorschach’s ink blots, the person creates figures and scenes out of the shapeless light and sound.

A devil appears which terrifies the player. People, de­mons, animals, God and angels appear and fade. Scenes are clearcut or a maelstrom of movement and ill-defined activity. Events arise showing every and any aspect of human experi­ence. Nothing is impossible.

If, on stepping out, we told the player that what occurred was all their own creation due to unconscious feelings, fears, habits, thoughts and physiological processes occurring within them, like the seashell effect, they might say ‘Good God, is that all it was, and I thought it was real. What a waste of time.’

Whether we can accept it or not, as a species we have created out of our own longings, fears, pain and perhaps vi­sion, God, with many different names—politics, money, dev­ils, nationalism, angels, an, and so on and on. All of it has flowed out of us. Perhaps we even deny we are the authors of the Bible, wars, social environments. Responsibility is diffi­cult.

It is easier to believe the source is outside oneself. And if we do take responsibility for our amazing creativity, we may feel ‘is that all it is—me?’ Yet out of such things, such fears, such drives, such unconscious patterns as we shape our dreams with, we shape our life and fonune, we shape our children, we shape the world and our future.

The shadow of fear we create in our dream, the situation of aloneness and anger, becomes a pattern of feelings, real in its world of mind. We create a monster, a Djinn, a devil, which then haunts and influences us. Or with feelings of hope, of purposiveness and love, create other forces in us and the world. But we are the creator. We are in no way separate from the forces which create our existence. We are those creative forces. In the deep­est sense, not just as an ego, we create ourselves, and we go on creating ourselves. We are the God humanity has looked so long for.

The second aspect of the human spirit demonstrated by dreams is consciousness.

The unconscious mind, if its func­tion is not clogged with a backlog of undealt with painful childhood experience and nonfunctional premises, has a pro­pensity to form gestalts. It takes pieces of experience and fits them together to form a whole. This is illustrated by how we form gestalts when viewing newsprint photographs, which are made up of many small dots. Our mind fits them together and sees them as a whole, giving meaning where there are only dots. When the human mind is working well, when the indi­vidual can face a wide range of emotions, from fear and pain to ecstasy, this process of forming gestalts can operate very creatively. This is because it needs conscious involvement, and if the personality is frightened of deep feeling, the uniting of deeply infantile and often disturbing cxpcrience is cut out. Yet these areas are very rich mines of information, containing our most fundamental learning.

If the process is working well, then one’s expenence is gradually transformed into insights which transcend and thereby transform one s personal life.

For instance, we have witnessed our own binh in some manner, we also see many others appeanng as babies. We see people ageing, dying. We see millions of events in our life and in others.

The uncon­scious, deeply versed in imagery, ritual and body language, out of which it creates its dreams, picks up information from music, architecture, traditional rituals, people walking in the street, the unspoken world of parental influence.

The sources are massive, unbelievable. And out of it all our mind creates meaning. Like a process of placing face over face over face until a composite face is formed, a synthesis of all the faces; so the unconscious scans all this information and creates a world view, a concept of life and death.

The archetypes Jung talks of are perhaps the resulting synthesis of our own expenence, reaching points others have met also.

If so, then Chnst might be our impression of humanity as a whole.

If we dare to touch such a synthesis of experience it may be seanng, breathtaking.

It breaks the boundaries of our present personality and con­cepts because it transcends. It shatters us to let the new vision emerge. It reaches, it soars, like an eagle flying above the single events of life. Perhaps because of this the great hawk of ancient Egypt represented the human spirit.

Lastly, humans have always been faced by the impossible.

To a baby, walking and not wetting its pants is impossible, but with many a fall and accident it does the impossible.

It is a god in its achievement.

To talk, to fly heavier-than-air planes, to walk on the Moon, were all impossible. Humans challenge the impossible every day. Over and over they fall, back into defeat. Many lie there broken. Yet with the next moment along come youngsters with no more sense than grasshoppers, and because they don’t know what the differ­ence is between right and left, do the impossible. Out of the infinite potential, the great unknown, they draw something new. With hope, with folly, with a wisdom they gain from who knows where, they demand more. And it’s a common everyday son of miracle. Mothers do it constantly for their children—transcending themselves. Lovers go through hell and heaven for each other and flower beyond who they were. You and I grow old on it as our daily bread, yet fail to see how holy it is. And if we turn away from it, it is because it offers no certainties, gives no authority, claims no reward.

It is the spir­itual life of people on the street. And our dreams remember, even if we fail.

For this is the body and blood of the human spirit.

dream as a therapist and healer There is a long tradition of using dreams as a base for both physical and psychological healing. One of the earliest recorded incidents of such healing is when Pharaoh’s ‘spirit was troubled, and he sent for all the magicians of Egypt and all its wise men; and Pharaoh told them his dream, but there was none who could interpret it’. Then Joseph revealed the meaning of the dream and so the healing of Pharaoh’s troubled mind took place (Genesis 41).

The Greek Temples of Asclepius were devoted to using dreams as a base for healing of body and mind (see dreams and ancient Greece).

The Iroquois Amerindians used a social form of dream therapy also (see Iroquoian dream cult).

The dream process was used much more widely throughout his­tory in such practices as Pentecostal Christianity, shaktipat yoga in India, and Anton Mesmer’s groups (see sleep move­ments).

Sigmund Freud pioneered the modern approach to the use of dreams in therapy, but many different approaches have developed since his work. Examples of the therapeutic action of gaining insight into dreams are to be found in the entnes on abreaction, recurring dreams, reptiles.

The entry on dream processing gives information about using a dream to gain insight and healing. See also dream as meeting place.

A feature which people who use their dreams as a thera­peutic tool mention again and again is how dreams empower them. Many of us have an unconscious feeling that any impor­tant healing work regarding our body and mind can only be undertaken and directed by an expert, the expert might be a doctor, a psychiatrist, psychotherapist, or osteopath. Witness­ing the result of their own dream process, even if helped by an expert, people feel in touch with a wonderful internal process which is working actively for their own good. One woman, who had worked on her dream with the help of a fnend (non expert), said It gave me great confidence in my own internal process. I realised there was something powerful in myself working for my own good. It was a feeling of cooperating with life.’ One is frequently amazed by one’s own resources of wisdom, penetrating insight and sense of connection with life, as met in dreamwork. This is how dreams play a pan in helping one towards wholeness and balance.

The growing awareness of one’s central view of things, which is so wide, piercing and often humorous, brings developing self respect as the saga of one’s dreams unfolds.

There may be no hint of this, however, if a person simply records their dreams without attempting to find a deeply felt contact with their contents.

It is in the searching for associ­ated feelings and ideas that the work of integrating the many strands of one’s life begins. Gradually one weaves, through a co-operative action with the dream process, a greater unifica­tion of the dark and the light, the painful and transcendent in one’s nature.

The result is an extraordinary process of educa­tion. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Processing

Below are described simple techniques which make it possible to gain information quickly from dreams. They have been put as a series of questions.

What is the background to the dream? The most imponant aspects of your everyday life may have influenced the dream or feature in it. Briefly consider any aspects of your life which connect with what appears in the dream. Example: ‘1 have a plane to catch. I get to the plane but the suitcase is never big enough for my clothing which I have left behind. I am always anxious about stuff left behind. I wake still with the feeling of anxiety’ (Jane). When asked, Jane said plane flights had been a big feature of her life. She had moved home often, travelling to different pans of the world, leaving friends and loved ones behind.

What is the main action in the dream? There is often an over­all activity such as walking, looking, worrying, building some­thing, or trying to escape. Define what it is and consider if it is expressive of something you are doing in waking life. Activi­ties such as walking or building a house need to be seen as generalisations; walking can simply represent taking a direc­tion in life. When you have defined the action, look for fur­ther information under the other headings in this book, such as swimming or sitting.

What is your role in the dream? Are you a friend, lover, sol­dier, dictator, watcher or participant in the dream? Consider this in relationship with your everyday life, especially in con­nection with how the dream presents it. Where possible, look for the entry on the role in this book. See dreamer.

Are you active or passive in the dream? By passive is meant not taking the leading role, being only an observer, being directed by other people and events, If you are passive, consider if you live in a similar attitude in your life. See active/passive.

What do you feel in the dream? Define what is felt emotionally and physically. In the physical sense are you tired, cold, re­laxed or hungry? In the emotional sense do you feel sad, angry, lost, tender or frightened anywhere in the dream? This helps clarify what feeling area the dream is dealing with.

It is important also to define whether the feelings in the dream were satisfyingly expressed or whether held back.

If held back they need fuller expression. See emotions and mood.

Is there a because’ factor in the dream? In many dreams something happens, fails to happen, or appears . . . be­cause! For instance, trapped in a room you find a door to escape through. All is dark beyond and you do not go through the door ‘because’ you are frightened of the dark. In this case the ‘because’ factor is fear.

The dream also suggests you are trapped in an unsatisfying life through fear of opportunity or the unknown.

Am I meeting the things I fear in my dream? Because a dream is an entirely inward thing, we create it completely out of our own internal feelings, images, creativity, habits and insights. So even the monsters of our dream are a pan of ourself.

If we run from them it is only aspects of ourself we are avoiding. Through defining what feelings occur in the dream you may be able to clarify what it is you are avoiding. See nightmares; dream as spiritual guide.

What does the dream mean? We alone create the dream while asleep. Therefore, by looking at each symbol or aspect of the dream, we can discover from what feelings, thoughts or expe­rience, what drive or what insight we have created the drama of the dream. In a playful relaxed way, express whatever you think, feel, remember or fantasise when you hold each symbol in mind. Say or write it all, even the seemingly trivial or dan­gerous’ bits. It helps to act the pan of each thing if you can; for instance as a house you might describe yourself as ‘a bit old, but with open doors for family and friends to come in and out. I feel solid and dependable, but I sense there is something hidden in my cellar’. Such statements portray one­self graphically. Consider whatever information you gather as descriptive of your waking life. Try to summarise it, as this will aid the gaining of insight.

Try amplifying your dream You will need the help of one or two friends to use this method.

The basis is to take the role of each part of the dream, as described above. This may seem strange at first, but persist. Supposing your name is Julia and you dreamt you were carrying an umbrella, but failed to use it even though it was raining, you would talk in the first person present—I am an umbrella. Julia is carrying me but for some reason doesn’t use me.’ Having finished saying what you could about yourself, your friend(s) then ask you questions about yourself as the dream figure or object. These questions need to be simple and directly about the dream symbol. So they could ask Are you an old umbrella?’ Does Julia know she is canying you?’ ‘What is your function as an umbrella? ‘Are you big enough to shelter Julia and someone else?’ And so on.

The aim of the questions is to draw out information about the symbol being explored.

If it is a known person or object you are in the role of—your father for instance—the replies to the questions need to be answered from the point of view of what happened in the dream, rather than as in real life. Listen to what you are saying about yourself as the dream symbol, and when your questioneKs) has finished, review your statements to see if you can see how they refer to your life and yourself.

If you are asking the questions, even if you have ideas regarding the dream, do not attempt to interpret. Put your ideas into simple questions the dreamer can respond to. Maintain a sense of curiosity and attempt to understand, to make the dream plain in an everyday language sense. Lead the dreamer towards seeing what the dream means through the questions. When you have exhausted your questions ask the dreamer to summarise what they have gathered from their replies. See postures, movements and body language for an example of how to work with body movement to explore a dream meaning.

Can / alter the dream to find greater satisfaction? Imagine yourself in the dream and continue it as a fantasy or day­dream. Alter the dream in any way that satisfies. Experiment with it, play with it, until you find a fuller sense of self expres­sion.

It is very imponant to note whether any anger or hostil­ity is in the dream but not fully expressed.

If so, let yourself imagine a full expression of the anger. It may be that as this is practised more anger is openly expressed in subsequent dreams. This is healthy, allowing such feelings to be vented and redirected into satisfying ways, individually and socially. In doing this do not ignore any feelings of resistance, pleasure or anxiety. Satisfaction occurs only as we leam to acknowl­edge and integrate resistances and anxieties into what we ex­press. This is a very important step. It gradually changes those of our habits which trap us in lack of satisfaction, poor cre­ativity or inability to resolve problems.

Summary To summarise effectively gather the essence of what you have said about each symbol and the dream as a whole and express it in everyday language. Imagine you are explaining to someone who knows nothing about yourself or the dream. Bnng the dream out of its symbols into everyday comments about yourself.

A man dreamt about a grey, dull office. When he looked at what he said about the office he realised he was talking about the grey, unimaginative world he grew up in after the Second World War, and how it shaped him.

Further information on using these techniques can be found in Tony Crisp s work The Instant Dream Book, published by C.W. Daniel. See amplification; plot of dream; adventure of the dream world; dreamer; postures, movement and body language; settings; symbols and dreaming; word analysis of dreams; wordplay and puns. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dwarf, Malformed Figure

A pan of our personality left un­developed or not integrated.

For instance we may have musi­cal ability which was suppressed by the need to bnng up children. Also a pan of self malformed by painful childhood experience or lack of emotional nourishment. It may therefore be a link with our unconscious. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Embryo

An extremely vulnerable aspect of us; our own prenatal experience; or our feelings connected with our pre­natal life—for instance we may have been told our mother tned to abort us. Even if this is not so, the idea acts as a focus for our feelings of rejection and infantile pain.

The embryo or foetus would therefore symbolise such feelings. See baby. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Emotions, Mood

There is a level of human experience which is typified by intense emotional and physical response to life. Such emotions and bodily drives may remain almost entirely unconscious until touched by exploring our dream content in the right setting. When such feelings and bodily movements arise, as they do in dreams, we may be amazed at their power and clarity. See dream processing; sleep move­ments.

If we take away the images and events occurring in a dream and simply look to see what feelings or emotions are evident, the dream is often more understandable than if we try to interpret the symbols. Feelings in dreams are nearly always undistoned. We therefore do not need to interpret them, sim­ply to acknowledge them and see if we can recognise where they occur in waking life.

The images in a dream may be the way we unconsciously pictorialise our flux of feelings and the play of internal energy flows.

For instance love or sexual drive can give rise to physical movement—as in sexual intercourse. Repression of sex or love also represses such physical move­ments, leading to tension and conflict, which might be pre­sented in the drama of a dream.

Example: ‘I was with my wife, walking along a street, on holiday with her. But I felt awful tension. It was the son of stress I feel when I have turned off my sexual flow—as I have at the moment’ (Brian V). Brian can easily see the connection between the dream feelings and his everyday life, although sometimes we need to practise this. But the situation could as easily be expressed as a dream image of a blocked river.

The underlying feelings would then be less easy to grasp.

Example: ‘I was in a very ancient crumbling building, con­fronted by a large stone door, deeply engraved with many designs and creatures. I began to open the door and felt high feelings of anxiety. I realised this was an initiation and I must calm my feelings in order to pass beyond the door, i.e. if I were controlled by my feelings I would run away’ (Derek F). How we meet the emotions in our dreams illustrates our ha­bitual method of dealing with them.

The feelings of anxiety in Derek’s dream were met and moved beyond, but this is un­usual. This is because most of us change our direction as soon as there is a hint of fear.

The amount of nicotine and alcohol human beings consume suggests how poorly we meet anxiety. Going beyond fear or pain is an initiation which opens doors for us. We might now apply for the job, ask for the date, raise the issue, express the creativity, make the journey abroad, which anxiety previously kept us from. We see this in the next example: I had a ring on my marriage finger. It was a thin band of gold. I woke up frightened’ (Angela). Angela is not married and feels anxiety about the commitment.

Dreams give us a safe area to express emotions which might be difficult or dangerous to release socially. Anger in a dream may be expressing what we failed to express in a wak­ing encounter, or it might be our habitual response. It may also be directed against ourself. Dreams also contain many positive emotions. Sometimes they present a new aspect of feeling which is life enhancing.

A person who habitually felt at odds with her father and relatives experienced a dream in which she felt forgiveness for the first time. This was entirely new for her and led to a reconciliation with her family.

Some feeling states in a dream are subtle, and may be more evident in terms of the symbols than the feelings.

A grey drear environment suggests depression and lack of pleasure.

A sunny light environment with flowers and colour shows plea­sure and good feelings.

A country landscape depicts quite a different feeling state to a smoky busy city street. We can define these for ourself using the techniques described under dream processing.

Whatever feelings or emotions we meet in our dreams, many of them are bound to be habitual responses we have to life. Where these habits are negative we can begin to change them by working with the dream images as described in the last question under dream processing. See love; hostility. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Enclosed, Enclosure

The defences we use, such as pnde, beliefs, anger, to protect ourselves from deeply feeling the impact of the world, relationships, love, anxiety or pain. These are often felt as traps or restraints, even though they are parts of our own personality.

For instance one may feel trapped by one’s own feelings of dependence upon family.

Example: ‘1 am trapped in a bricked room with no way out and I shout for somebody to help me. Then either a big bird or a creature with long arms tries to catch me, and I scream’ (Karen S). Karen had previously lost a baby, been divorced, had an unsatisfying relationship with a man. She feels trapped by the defences she has herself built ‘brick by brick’, but is frightened of the opportunity of change represented by the bird. What encloses or traps us in our dream gives a clue to what constrains us in waking.

Example: ‘As I go through a tunnel it either gets smaller so I can’t get through, or it goes on so far there is no end to it. I am trapped and terrified’ (Don M). This son of enclosed dream is typical of trauma relating to a difficult binh. In fact Don’s mother was in labour for four days, and never had another child because of the pain. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Hat

Opinions, beliefs, mental attitudes—for instance a Jew­ish skull cap would represent the religious beliefs of the wearer. Idioms: at the drop of a hat; brass hat, eat one’s hat; hang on to one’s hat; under one’s hat, old hat. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Information Processing

According to modem theory, the amount of information the human brain can hold is more than is held in all the books in the Library of the British Museum. Gradually it is becoming recognised that informa­tion gathered is not simply what we ‘learn’ from vocal com­munication, or read, or set out to leam. In fact an unimagin­able amount of information gathering has gone on prior to speech, and goes on at an unimaginable speed prior to school years. Consider a small preschool child walking into the gar­den It has learnt gradually to relate to muscular movement, balance and its own motivations and feeling reactions in a way enabling it to walk. It has already grasped thousands of bits of ‘information’ about such things as plants in the garden, the neighbour’s cat, the road outside, possible dangers, safe areas. Stupendous amounts have already been absorbed about interrelationships.

An idea of ‘reality’ in the sense of what is probable, and what would be dangerously out of norm, has been formed. We gather information in ways little recognised. How our parents relate to their environment and to other people is all recorded and leamt from, bringing about enor­mous ‘programming’ affecting how we act in similar circum­stances.

As explained in the entry on the dream as spiritual guide, we have great ability in ‘reading’ symbols, ritual, an, music, body language, architecture, drama, and extracting ‘meaning’ from them. So we have immense stores of information from these sources. Work done with people exploring their dreams over a long period suggests that some of these information resources are never focused on enough to make conscious what we have actually learnt. Sometimes it is enough simply to ask oneself a question to begin to focus some of these resources. Such questions as what social attitude and response to authority did I learn at school? What feeling reaction do I get when I am in the presence of someone I know well? These may help to bring to awareness aspects of information gath­ered but remaining unconscious. These unfocused, or uncon­scious, areas of information can explain why we have appar­ently irrational feeling responses to some people or situations.

the body A lot of what we call the unconscious are basic physiological and psychological functions.

For instance in a modern house, when we flush the toilet, we do not have to bring a bucket of water and fill the cistern again.

A self regu­lating mechanism allows water to flow in and switches it off when full. This is a clever built-in function that had to be done manually at one time. Nowadays we have built into some dwellings fire sprinklers or burglar alarms. Through re­peated actions over thousands or millions of years, many ba­sic functions, or functions only switched on in emergencies, have been built into our being. We do not need to think about them, just as we do not have to give awareness to the fire sprinkling system or toilet each time we walk through a room or flush the toilet. They are therefore unconscious.

Research with animals in connection with rewards and conditioned reflexes has shown that by gradually leading an animal towards a certain performance by rewarding it each time it gets nearer to the goal, it can do the most amazing things. It can increase the circulation of blood to its ear, slow its heart, and in fact influence body functions which were thought to be completely involuntary. Where human beings have learnt to use some of these techniques—such as raising the temperature of an arm at will, or helping to increase the efficiency of the immune system—the actual processes still remain unconscious. In general, however, the body’s func­tions are thought to be outside our awareness, and so are one of the areas of the unconscious. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Jewels

Things we, or our unconscious, treasures, our integ­rity or sense of wholeness, the lasting pans of our nature, even the eternal aspect of self or the essential core of our life.

For instance, ability to work creatively with others is not just valu­able in general, it also expresses the powerful symbiotic force in nature, it connects one with the universal. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Loiry

Similar to car—drives such as ambition, what moti­vates one—but usually connected with work or our more commercial relationship with people.

For instance, one s per­sonal motivations meeting the influence of big unified groups such as the police or large businesses.

Example: ‘I was a passenger in a very large eight-wheeled lorry, my husband being the driver. We stopped at a pedes­trian crossing in our town and my husband got out of the driving seat and went into the local town hall near a crossing. I waited in the lorry for what in my dream seemed hours.

The next thing I remember is that I was then riding a bicycle on the other side of the crossing and cycled away up the road’ (Diann R). Her husband’s involvement with social and work activities—the lorry and hall—make Diann decide to become more independent rather than wait for her husband to be ‘with her’. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Lucidity, Awake In Sleep

Sometimes in the practice of deep relaxation, meditation or sensory deprivation, our being enters into a state akin to sleep, yet we maintain a personal waking awareness. This is like a journey into a deep interior world of mind and body where our senses no longer function in their waking manner, where the brain works in a different way, and where awareness is introverted in a degree we do not usually experience. It can be a frightening world, simply because we are not accustomed to it. In a similar way a measure of waking awareness can arise while dreaming. This is called lucid dreaming. During it we can change or wilfully direct what is happening in the dream in a way not usual to the dream state.

Example: 4I had backed my car into a big yard, a commer­cial area. My wife, two of my sons and I got out of the car. As we stood in the yard talking I realised there was a motorbike where my car should be. I said to everyone, “There was a car here a moment ago, now it’s a motorbike. Do you know what that means? It means we are dreaming.” Mark my son was now with us, and my ex-wife. I asked them if they realised they were dreaming. They got very vague and didn’t reply. I asked them again and felt very clearly awake’ (William V). William’s is a fairly typical lucid dream, but there are features which it does not illustrate. During the days or weeks prior to a lucid dream, many people experience an increase in flying dreams.

The next example shows another common feature.

Example: In many of my dreams I become aware that I am dreaming. Also, if anything unpleasant threatens me in the dream I get away from it by waking myself (Alan). Lucidity often has this feature of enabling the dreamer to avoid un­pleasant elements of the dream.

The decision to avoid any unpleasant internal emotions is a common feature of a per­son’s conscious life, so this aspect of lucidity is simply a way of taking such a decision into the dream. Some writers even suggest it as a way of dealing with frightening dreams. Avoid­ance does not solve the problem, it simply pushes the emo­tion deeper into the unconscious where it can do damage more surreptitiously. Recent findings regarding suppressed gnef and stress, which connects them with a higher incidence of cancer, suggests that suppression is not a healthy way of dealing with feelings.

Another approach to lucidity is that it can be a son of playground where one can walk through walls, jump from high buildings and fly, change the sofa into an attractive lover, and so on. True, the realisation that our dream life is a differ­ent world and that it does have completely different principles at work than our waking world is imponant. Often people introven into their dream life the morals and fears which are only relevant to being awake in physical life.

To avoid a charging bull is cenainly imponant in waking life. In our dream life, though, to meet its charge is to integrate the enor­mous energy which the bull represents, an energy which is our own but which we may have been avoiding or running away’ from previously. Realising such simple differences revolutionises the way we relate to our own internal events and possibilities.

To treat lucid dreams as if they offered no other attainable expenence than to manipulate the dream en­vironment, or avoid an encounter, is to miss an amazing fea­ture of human potential.

Example: ‘In my dream I was watching a fern grow. It was small but opened out very rapidly. As I watched I became aware that the fern was simply an image representing a pro­cess occurring within myself which I grew increasingly aware of as I watched. Then I was fully awake in my dream and realised that my dream, perhaps any dream, was an expres­sion of actual and real events occurring in my body and mind. I felt enormous excitement, as if I were witnessing something of great importance’ (Francis P).

It is now acceptable, through the work of Freud, Jung and many others, to consider that within images of the dream lie valuable information about what is occurring within the dreamer, perhaps unconsciously. Strangely, though, it is almost never considered that one can have direct perception into this level of internal ‘events’ with­out the dream. What Francis describes is an experience of being on the cusp of symbols and direct perception. Consider­ing the enormous advantage of such direct information gath­ering, it is surprising it is seldom mentioned except in the writings of Corriere and Han, The Dream Makers.

Example: After defining why I had not woken in sleep recently, i.e. loss of belief, I had the following experience. I awoke in my sleep and began to see, without any symbols, that my attitudes and sleep movements expressed a feeling of restrained antagonism or irritation to my wife. I could also observe the feelings were arising from my discipline of sexual­ity. Realising I did not want those feelings I altered them and woke enough to turn towards her’ (Francis P). After the first of his direct perception dreams, Francis attempted to use this function again, resulting in the above, and other, such dreams. Just as classic dream interpretation says that the dream symbols represent psychobiological logical processes which might be uncovered by dream processing, what we see in Francis’ lucidity is a direct route to self insight, and through it a rapid personal growth to improved life experience. Such dreams provide not only psychological insight, but very fre­quently a direct perception of processes occurring in the body, as the following example illustrates.

Example: ‘Although deeply asleep I was wide awake with­out any shape or form. I had direct experience, without any pictures, of the action of the energies in my body. I had no awareness of body shape, only of the flow of activities in the organs. I checked over what I could observe, and noticed a tension in my neck was interfering with the flow and ex­change of energies between the head and trunk. It was also obvious from what I could see that the tension was due to an attitude I had to authority, and if the tension remained it could lead to physical ill health’ (Tony C).

An effective way to develop lucidity is frequently to con­sider the events of waking life as if they were a dream. Try to see events as one might see dream symbols. What do they mean in terms of one’s motivations, fears, personal growth? What do they suggest about oneself? For instance a person who works in a photographic darkroom developing films and prints might see they were trying to bnng to consciousness the latent—unconscious—side of themselves.

A banker might feel they were working at how best to deal with their sexual and personal resources. In this way one might actually apply what is said in this dream dictionary to one’s outer circumstances.

The second instruction is, on waking, at a convenient mo­ment, imagine oneself standing within one’s recent dream. As you get a sense of this dream environment, realise that you are taking waking awareness into the dream. From the standpoint of being fully aware of the dream action and events, what will you now do in and with the dream? Re-dream it with con­sciousness.

For example the things you run from in your nor­mal dreaming you could now face. See dream processing for fun her suggestions. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Numbers

Numbers can have a personal or symbolic signifi­cance.

For instance we may have had three children, so the number three in a dream about children could be connected with our feelings or fears about them—although three has generally been seen as the troublesome triangle in love, or the child, mother, father threesome. So a number may refer to a particular year of one’s life, the number of a house, the months or years that have passed since an important event, your family group, or merely have a general significance. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Out Of Body Experience

Example: ‘At about two or three in the morning my wife Brenda and I were suddenly awoken from sleep by a noise. As we lifted our heads to listen we identified it as the handle on our children’s bedroom door being turned.

The house only had two bedrooms, and the children’s room was directly opposite ours. Both of us had had the same thought—”Oh no, it’s the children again.” Much to our annoyance they had been waking in the middle of the night claiming it was morning and time to play. We had tried to suppress it, but here it was again.

As these thoughts went through our minds we heard the sound of feet clomping down the stairs. This was strange as the children usually stayed in their room. Brenda got up, de­termined to get whoever it was back into bed. I heard her switch the light on, go down the stairs, switch the sitting room light on, and I followed her via the sounds of her movement as she looked in the kitchen and even toilet—we didn’t have a bathroom. Then up she came again and opened the children’s door—strange because we had assumed it had been opened. When she came back into our room she looked puzzled and a little scared. “They’re all asleep and in bed ‘ she said. ‘We talked over the mystery for some time, trying to under­stand just how we had heard the door handle rattle then foot­steps going down the stairs, yet the door wasn’t open. Also, the door handles on our doors were too high for the children to reach without standing on a chair. There was a stool in the children’s bedroom they used for that, yet it wasn’t even near the door when Brenda opened it.

Having no answer to the puzzle we stopped talking and settled to wait for sleep again. Suddenly a noise came from the children’s bedroom. It sounded like the stool being dragged and then the door handle turning again but the door not opening. “You go this time” Brenda said, obviously disturbed.

‘I opened our door quickly just in time to see the opposite door handle turn again. Still the door didn’t open. I reached across, turned the handle and slowly opened the door. It stopped as something was blocking it. Just then my daughter Helen’s small face peered around the door—high because she was standing on the stool. Puzzled by what had happened, I was careful what I said to her. “What do you want love?” I asked.

‘Unperturbed she replied, “I want to go to the toilet.” The toilet was downstairs, through the sitting room, and through the kitchen.

‘Now I had a clue so asked, “Did you go downstairs be­fore?”

“Yes,” she said, “but Mummy sent me back to bed.” * (Tony C).

This is an unusual example of an out of body experience (OBE). Mostly they are described from the point of view of the person projecting, and are therefore difficult to corroborate. Here, three people experience the OBE in their own way. From Tony and Brenda’s point of view what happened caused sensory stimuli, but only auditory. Helen’s statement says that she was sure she had physically walked down the stairs and been sent back to bed by her mother. Tony and Brenda felt there was a direct connection between what they were think­ing and feeling—get the children back to bed—and what Helen experienced as an objective reality.

OBEs have been reported in thousands in every culture and in every period of history.

A more general experience of OBE than the above might include a feeling of rushing along a tunnel or release from a tight place prior to the awareness of independence from the body. In this first stage some people experience a sense of physical paralysis which may be fright­ening (see paralysis). Their awareness then seems to become an observing point outside the body, as well as the sense of paralysis. Then there is usually an intense awareness of one­self and surroundings, unlike dreaming or even lucidity. Some projectors feel they are even more vitally aware and rational than during the waking state. Looking back on one’s body may occur here. Once the awareness is independent of the body, the boundaries of time and space as they are known in the body do not exist. One can easily pass through walls, fly, travel to or immediately be in a far distant place, witnessing what may be, or appears to be, physically real there.

Sir Auckland Geddes, an eminent British anatomist, de­scribes his own OBE, which contains many of these features. Example: Becoming suddenly and violently ill with gas­troenteritis he quickly became unable to move or phone for help. As this was occurring he noticed he had an A and a B consciousness.

The A was his normal awareness, and the B was external to his body, watching. From the B self he could see not only his body, but also the house, garden and sur­rounds. He need only think of a friend or place and immedi­ately he was there and was later able to find confirmation for his observations. In looking at his body, he noticed that the brain was only an end organ, like a condensing plate, upon which memory and awareness played.

The mind, he said, was not in the brain, the brain was in the mind, like a radio in the play of signals. He then observed his daughter come in and discover his condition, saw her telephone a doctor friend, and saw him also at the same time.

Many cases of OBE occur near death, where a person has died* of a hean attack for instance, and is later revived. Be­cause of this there are attempts to consider the possibility of survival of death through study of these cases. In fact many people experiencing an OBE have a very different view of death than prior to their experience.

Early attempts to explain OBEs suggested a subtle or astral body, which is a double of our physical and mental self, but able to pass through walls. It was said to be connected to the physical body during an OBE by a silver cord—a son of life­line which kept the physical body alive. This is like the con­cept that the people we dream about are not creations of our own psyche, but real in their own right. Whatever one may believe an OBE to be, it can be observed that many people in this condition have no silver cord, and have no body at all, but are simply a bodiless observer, or are an animal, a geo­metric shape, a colour or sound (see identity and dreams).

The person’s own unconscious concepts of self seem to be the factor which shapes the form of the OBE. If, therefore, one feels sure one must travel to a distant point, then in the OBE one travels.

If one believes one is immediately there by the power of thought, one is there.

If one cannot conceive of existing without a body, then one has a body, and so on.

This approach explains many aspects of the OBE, but there is still not a clear concept of what the relationship with the physical world is.

The many cases of OBE which occur during a near-death experience also suggest it may be connected with a survival response to death; not necessarily as a way of trying to transcend death, but perhaps as a primeval form of warning relatives of death.

If there is survival of death, then the OBE may be an anticipatory form, or a preparatory condition lead­ing to the new form. See hallucinations, hallucinogens. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Parcel, Package

Something we have experienced but not explored the impon of.

A parent may die, for instance, but we may not ‘unwrap’ the feelings evoked enough to see we have taken something to hean.

If we did we might find a regret at not expressing the love we felt while Mum or Dad was still alive, and we now want to be more daring in giving love. Also, one’s potential or latent skills; impressions or ‘gifts’ re­ceived from others—such as support, love, their example— but not made fully conscious. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Precognition

As a pan of the human survival ability, the capacity to predict the future is a well-developed everyday pan of life—so much so we often fail to notice it. When crossing a road we quickly take in factors related to sounds, car speeds and our own physical condition, and predict the likelihood of being able to cross the road without injury. Based on informa­tion gathered, often unconsciously, we also attempt to assess or predict the outcome of relationships, job interviews, busi­ness ventures, and any course of action imponant to us.

If detailed observations were made of the habits of ten people, one could predict fairly accurately what they would be doing for the next week, perhaps even pinpointing the time and place.

For instance some would never visit a pub, while others would be frequently there.

Because the unconscious is the storehouse of millions of bits of observed information, and because it has a well-devel­oped function enabling us to scan information and predict from it, some dreams forecast the future. Such predictions may occur more frequently in a dream rather than as waking insight, because few people can put aside their likes and dis­likes, prejudices and hopes sufficiently to allow such informa­tion into the consciousness. While asleep some of these barri­ers drop and allow information to be presented.

Ed Butler’s dream is about his work scene. Each detail was real and horrifying. Shonly afterwards, Rita was burnt just as in the dream. Example: ‘I was stanled by the muffled but unmistakable sound of a nearby explosion. While unex­pected, it wasn’t entirely unusual—the high energy propel- lants and oxidisers being synthesised and tested in the chem­istry wing were hazardously unstable. When I heard the screams I froze for an instant, recognising that they could only be coming from Rita, the one woman chemist in the all male department. I rushed to the doorway of her laboratory. Peer­ing through the smoke and fumes I saw a foot sticking out of the surrounding flames. I was only in my shirt sleeves, unpro­tected, not even wearing my lab coat, but I had to go into the flames. I grabbed Rita by the foot and noticed with horror that her stockings were melting from the heat. I pulled her back into the doorway and tugged at a chain which released gallons of water on her flaming body. When satisfied the fire was quenched, even though my own clothes still smouldered, I ran for the emergency phone’ (from Dream Network Bulletin, June 1985).

Some precognitive dreams appear to go beyond this ability to predict from information already held. So far there is no theory which is commonly accepted which explains this.

A not too bizarre one, however, is thai our unconscious has access to a collective mind. With so much more information available, it can transcend the usual limitations when predict­ing from personal information.

The next examples are all from Shirley G. Because of space, only three of the dreams are quoted. Nevertheless, they are typical of dreams which do not seem to fall into the category of precognitive dreams arising from unconscious scanning or information already known. Example: ‘1 set out to dream the winner of a horse race each day for a week. I was driving down a country road and sud­denly saw a glimpse of Emmerdale Farm down a side road. Following day: chosen horse Emmerdale Farm came in first. 2 Was working in a room when a man popped his head around the door and shouted excitedly “John, John, your uncle’s here” and disappeared. I carried on working. Chosen horse: Uncle John. Came in first. 3 Was walking down a road, called into a house by a friend to have a chat. On the way out she opened the door and I saw a completely empty room except for a huge black fireplace. Door closed and I left the house. Chosen horse Black Fire—which I insisted would only be placed due to a fireplace. Came in 2nd.* See ESP in dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Premenstrual Tension

Dr Ernest Hartmann carried out studies in connection with people who have stable sleep pat­terns. His aim was to define whether waking events influ­enced people’s need for sleep.

For instance, a loss of boy­friend or stress caused many young women to have an increased need for sleep. Some people who had undergone successful psychotherapy for their emotional difficulties, and some meditators, found their sleep need was decreased.

Wanting to know more about why these situations changed sleep need, Hartmann went on to study dream sleep in a group of women who suffered premenstrual tension (PMT). This group were prone to depression and irritability during PMT—records show there is an unusually high rate of mur­der, suicide and admission to psychiatric hospitals during this time. Although Hartmann found this group needed a little more sleep time than a control group, the main feature of change was their increased need for dreaming. Their length of time spent in dreaming increased in relationship to their de­pression.

The conclusion reached was that one of the func­tions of dreaming is to help deal with difficult states of emo­tion or anxiety. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Room

A particular feeling state—for instance the room might feel sinister, warm, spacious, cold, etc., so depicts such. Sometimes a room, because of its spaciousness, represents the amount of potential or opportunity one has.

The ‘containing’ quality of a room may also depict involvement in one’s mother. Finding extra rooms: a common dream theme—rec­ognition or discovery of previously unnoticed aspects, abili­ties, fears, or traits in oneself. Example: There was a room in my house I had never been in before. It was filled with water and had three kittens submerged in it. While in the room I didn’t need to breathe’ (Audrey P).

The room here represents Audrey’s childbearing function—her womb.

The room can therefore depict mother or qualities of mothering. See descrip­tions of various rooms under house in this entry. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Sex While Asleep

Example: Many times in my adult life I have woken to find I have made love to my wife while asleep. Or I wake to discover myself in the middle of the sexual act. At such times I have usually been avoiding my sexual drive and it has burst through to fulfil itself while I was asleep or under the sway of dreams.

For instance most times this hap­pened I have been in the middle of a dream in which there is a sense of absolute imperative that I must make love/have sex.

It is like being lost in a storm of glamour and fantasy or vision in which I am totally involved.

The whirl of the “dream” is towards the wonder, totality of the need to have sex. As this imperative is expressed in my still spontaneous, dreaming physical action, the experience of sex is also visionary and enormous’ (Charles W).

This fairly common dreaming experience demonstrates powerfully how dreams are an expression of a self regulatory or compensatory action in the psyche and body. Charles says that he had been restraining his sexual activity. This shows the enormous gulf which can exist between what we will to do as a conscious personality, and what our being needs to do or wishes to do outside conscious decision making.

The ‘glamour and fantasy’ Charles describes are regular features of how these deeper needs make themselves known, or attempt to coerce the conscious mind, into fulfilling the need.

If we reject the fantasy, the unconscious processes will attempt a more radical approach, as in actual physical movement while we sleep. This may have given rise to ideas about possession or devils in past ages, when it was not understood that we can split our mind by such conflicts. Fear of the possessing’ influ­ence actually heightens its power through suggestion.

It is much better to understand what one’s needs are, and seek an acceptable fulfilment. See abreaction. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Vitamin

Intuition about health needs; anxiety about health —hypochondria; thoughts or feelings which are healthy, for instance the confidence which one might gain by taking vita­mins might be healthier for one than the vitamins themselves. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

War

Internal conflicts. There might be a bloody battle be­tween one’s moral code and sexual needs, for instance; or between what we allow ourselves to feel and the self healing process which attempts to release childhood pain; or between intellect and body needs or emotions. Idioms : in the wars; on the warpath; war of nerves; declare war. See attack; fight; soldier under roles; bomb; air raid; unofficial Christ in Christ under archetypes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Water

Emotions, moods and flow of feeling energy. Because of the nature of water it lends itself to depicting aspects of how we relate to emotions; for instance, one can drown’ in or feel swept away by some emotions, at other times we can feel cleansed and refreshed. It also represents our potential to ex­perience many emotions because water can take any shape or move in so many ways. How we relate to the water shows how we are meeting our emotions and moods.

Example: ‘I am in deep water, no evidence that it is the sea. I am wearing my heavy brown coat. I have no fear, no feeling of cold and I pleasantly just sink’ (Mrs B). Mrs B is in her 80s, and is preparing for death in her dreams.

The water in her dream has the feeling of being womblike, suggesting that she senses death as a return to a womblike feeling state, with possible rebirth.

Example: ‘I was then standing in front of a senes of glass water tanks. I had apparently written an article about the balance between intellect and emotion, which had presented emotion in a way to show its equal value with intellect.

The tanks had water flowing through them with a series of valves. This demonstrated the different relationships between intel­lect and emotion. Some tanks were beautifully clear and col­ourful, showing the right balance.

The unbalanced ones had weed growing in them. I was then in a lift with a young woman. We moved close together and kissed. This moved my feelings so much I felt a great melting feeling in my abdomen, and a lot of body sensation against her body’ (Anthony F). Anthony’s dream perfectly illustrates how water refers to the emotions and flowing body feelings.

Example: ‘I was in a hospital ward—maybe for children. I was there to help them. In the ward was a large oblong tank full of water. I got into the water. I realised all the sick people in the ward bathed in the water—not soap, just immersion. This produced feelings of revulsion. I felt I would take into myself their sickness. I also thought that if I drank the water it would show the patients a positive attitude towards their sick­ness. They would no longer be afraid, and this would be a factor in their healing’ (Anthony F). Another of Anthony’s dreams in which he is looking at how to meet anxious feelings about his health. He sees that a more positive conscious atti­tude heals the childhood fears.

Entering water: entering into strong feelings such as might arise in a relationship or new job, sexual relationship, emo­tions which might stand in one’s way—as a deep lake might, or turgid water. Deep water: the deeps of one’s inner life. Hot water: strong emotions—see example in Introduction. Elec­tricity and water: emotions which can generate very powerful reaction to a situation, such as jealousy or anger. Idioms: make water, muddy the waters; tread water, water something down; turn on the waterworks; water under the bridge; hold water, in hot water, head above water; pour cold water onto something. See fluid; river; rain.

water creatures See fish, sea creatures. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Agent / Spy

Points to too much fantasizing. Wanderlust, being shallow. Make inquiries before coming to a decision; search for the truth first. This is a frequent dream symbol when life is boring and has no excitement. But this symbol may also be a general sign of searching. Ask yourself what it is that you are looking for (and what it is that you want to find).

Also addressed here may be a life lived intensely and dangerously.

It is the image of the male hero that appears when the dreamer is showing little masculinity, and in rare instances, also, when much masculinity is present in a woman or man).

On the other hand, this dream image also appears when the dreamer has an unconscious suspicion that, in most cases, is unfounded.

It is helpful in such cases to adopt a positive attitude to life (positive thinking).... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Apple

Health and naturalness; also renewal of life and the symbol of immortality (the golden apple). Seduction and sexual symbol for breast.

(The ideal in the Middle Ages was to have breasts like little apples.) Something that turns into something good (and deservedly so—for instance, William TelPs apple) or, less frequently, something that turns into something bad (see the Apple of Paris).

According to Freud, the apple, like almost every other Fruit, is the symbol for breasts, particularly when there is more than one apple. In psychoanalysis apples are generally considered a typical sexual symbol. According to C. G. Jung, they are a symbol of life, an ancient fertility symbol, as are the pomegranate, fig, and quince).... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Arm

Basics for action, reaching for or getting something. Wanting to accomplish something (“the arm of the state,” for instance). Also see Beggar.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Bird Woman

A creature of myth, symbolic of excitement and temptation, the anima in her heavenly and at the same time animalistic role threatening and destroying. Also a symbol of the wise woman (for instance, night owl) and a symbol of death.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Dog

The animalistic.

A symbol of instincts to be used and guided by conscience.

The dog may also appear as a guard to protect property and defend against attack. He may symbolize a true friend.

The dog is the closest creature that humans come to call “brother.” It may also represent part of the dreamer—for instance, the shadow.

The dog as a pet almost always points to our instinct or loss of instinct, particularly when it is a trained dog, which in this case does not imply cultivation, but rather the destruction of instincts.

The dog is also one who needs to inspect its environment, who looks for and finds information. In the Tarot the two images of “the Fool” and “the Dog” always appear together.

A vicious dog means envy and unscrupulousness. According to Jung, the dog is the undertaker who buries the Corpse.

The dog with its instincts is seen as aiding the process of dying and resurrection (like Anubis in ancient Egyptian mythology). According to Greek mythology, the dog from hell, Cerberus, stands on the border between life and death.

Also may point to fear of rejection—”dog” as an unattractive female.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Earth

Being rooted, grounded, protected. Everything grows from the womb of the earth, symbol of motherli- ness and fertility.

The type of earth may also point to the dreamer (for instance, clay, sand, humus, etc.) Memories and ancestors are residing deep within the earth. Also a symbol of a difficulty in digesting reality.

In the I Ching, earth represents the dedication to conception, the mother.

The food for the people of the Babylonian underworld was earth.

According to Jung, earth and clay are the food of the underworld, because as the earth accepts the dead, the dead eat the earth.

Basis and foundation of a subject.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Eyebrows

Vanity. Eyebrows joined above the nose are, according to folklore, a sign that physical urges dominate. During the Middle Ages, it was seen as revealing a pact with the devil. Important is the motion of the eyebrows as, for instance, raised eyebrows.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Food

Physical and emotional strength and energies. You are feeding the animal side in you.

Nourishment for body and soul.

The kind of food you see is urgently needed for your soul.

For instance, dreaming about Meat refers to drives and animalistic needs. Chocolate, on the other hand, or other sweets suggest being more open to love.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Forest

See Tree.

A frequent dream symbol of the unconscious. Walking the forbidden path in the forest might cause us to be swallowed up and swept away by drives and instincts.

The forest is a scary, potentially dangerous place where mysterious beings roam.

It is also a place of transition (in Dante’s Divine Comedy, for instance, a forest is found in front of the gates of Inferno, as well as at the end of Purgatorio and at the beginning of Paradiso). On the other hand, this symbol indicates the attempt to make contact with the unconscious. See also Hiding Place.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Four

A symbol of wholeness, according to Jung.

The four seasons, the phases of the moon, the four directions on a compass, particularly also the four elements—fire, air, earth, and water—the four limbs, the four functions of the conscience. Four creates order in chaos.

It is the symbol for becoming whole and becoming one, in contrast to Multiplicity.

For some Native Americans four is a holy number, the number for everything beautiful (for instance, in some traditions a prayer must be spoken four times). In alchemy the process of transformation happens in four stages. According to legend, the river in paradise separates into four rivers.

According to Jung, four always points out that we are on the way to becoming what we really are. Four symbolizes completeness and totality: the four temperaments and, in Christianity, the four directions of the Cross and Christ surrounded by four apostles.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Glass Wall

A frequent dream symbol when feeling cut off from others or objects; lack of contact. Something is seen as being unattainable. Re-examine your goals or ask if you have the necessary energies. In some instances, opposite image to Mirror.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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