insomnia

Dream Interpretation Insomnia | Dream Meanings


see Introduction

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary | Pamela Ball

(See Sleeplessness)

Islamic Dream Interpretation | Ibn Seerin

Dreaming of and actual insomnia is an affirmation of a need for peace of mind

Dream Dictionary Unlimited | Margaret Hamilton


Insomnia | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Insomnia

Sleeplessness

(Insomnia) In a dream, sleeplessness means loss of a beloved, the death of a child, separation between lovers, or leaving one’s family and travelling to a foreign country.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Bed, Mattress

Example: ‘I sit on a bed. Near me, looking at a book I am holding is a woman I know, Jane. I realise as we talk that her foot is touching mine. As my wife is on my left across the room I feel uncomfonable about this. Now Jane has her left hand on my penis. I have only underpants on.

The contact is pleasant and undemanding, but I feel more and more ill at ease. I feel Jane is not having any respect for my relationship with my wife and stan to tell her so’ (Mr BS). In the example the bed is the environment in which the action takes place.

The bed is an opportunity to explore the dream­er’s decisions about sex.

Bed is one of the commonest symbols in dreams. It repre­sents, depending on the dream context, marriage; sex, rest, giving up and taking to one’s bed, passivity; sensual rather than sexual contact; sickness, intimacy, privacy. Sometimes it represents sleep and meeting or unconscious—or torture, be­cause in bed we may be tortured by insomnia, worries, physi­cal pain. Also our lives—you’ve made your bed, now lie on it. Bed is an important symbol to understand. It so often shows exactly what we are doing in our subtle areas of relationship. In the example, the man is wrestling with his desire for plea­sure and his sense of commitment; but also, whether he will keep his pleasure for himself, or share it with his wife. See example in contraceptive. Idioms: bed of nails; bed of roses; go to bed with; make one’s bed and lie on it. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Black

(1) A black hole or dark depths - for example, an unlit cellar or a deep well or oceanic depths - may represent the unconscious. This blackness mav be frightening, so long as the unconscious remains alien and unfamiliar. However, black can also be warm and comforting - which is whv insomniacs arc sometimes advised to close their eyes and imagine themselves wrapped.round in black velvet.

If you begin to trust your unconscious (which means trusting Nature), each previously horrifying or disgusting part of your unconscious will show itself in a new light, as something vou need for personal fulfilment. Putting vour consciousness

into the unconscious - becoming aware of it - means putting more and more light into the darkness.

If a star or other bright light appears in the blackness, this may be seen as a ‘light at the end of the tunnel’, that is, as a symbol of the ‘illumination’ - new wisdom or insight - that may be achieved by dwelling a while in the unconscious and making its better acquaintance.

(2) Black (particularly for white people) may symbolize evil.

If so, bear in mind that, as a general rule, what appears in your dreams is always some part of you, and that the so-called ‘evil’ (and therefore repressed) parts of you are really evil only if, because of neglect, they become rebellious, or if you let them take control away from your conscious self. These ‘evil’ things are transformed into good things - creative, and bringing fuller life, happiness and wholeness - when conscious and unconscious interact and establish a harmonious working relationship.

NB It is only Judaism, Christianity and Islam that have a thoroughgoing dualism of good and evil, and a matching moral dogmatism. In the earliest known forms of religion, and in traditions (such as the Hindu, Buddhist and Taoist traditions) that have not cut themselves off from their early roots, good and evil are opposite but equally necessary’ components of reality; and in mystical traditions (including Jewish, Christian and Islamic mysticism) even God is described as a coming together of opposites - good and evil, but also masculine and feminine.

(3) A person dressed in black may represent vour shadow.

(4) A black-skinned person (if you are white-skinned) may represent either the shadow or closeness to Nature.

(5) A black animal probably represents some unconscious repressed drive or emotion.

If the animal is fierce, this possibly means that something yrou have repressed is now urgently pressing you to give it your conscious attention and let it have some expression in your w aking life.

(6) Blackness (as in a black night, etc.) may simply signify’ diminished visibility, in which case the meaning of the dream may have something to do w ith a loss of orientation in your life. Do vou feel you don’t know’ which w’ay to go; or that you don’t hav e the energy’ or will to go in any direction? If so, make a pact w ith v our unconscious to die effect that, if it will tell you where you have the potential - and the need - to go, you will respond accordingly in your life. Then pav close attention

to the dreams that follow. (If you go the next few nights without dreaming - or, more precisely, without recalling any dreams - this probably means that you are backing out of the pact and setting up a defence against what you fear your unconscious might have to tell you.)

(7) Black may symbolize despair or deep depression.

If so, follow the advice given in (6) above.

(8) In many parts of the world black is associated with death.

It is possible, therefore, that this is what the colour signifies in your dream. Bear in mind, however, that death in a dream may refer to something internal: the ‘death’ - or the giving up - of something within you (for example, some irrational fear, or other negative attitude or emotion). See also Death.... A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

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A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

Dreaming With Crystals

Crystal enthusiasts believe that dreaming with crystals can not only enhance healing and transformation but can also enhance your dream state in many ways, depending on the type of crystal and how it is used. The results can be enlightening, enriching and therapeutic.

Below is a list of some of the crystals you might use. It is important to stress, however, that the following guidelines are based on conjecture and anecdotal experience only:

Love and romance

Rose quartz and jade are thought to be good crystals or stones for dreams in which love is the issue at hand. Place either crystal (or both) under your pillow. The energies of these stones are thought to encourage dreams that are loving and filled with positive vibrations.

Money and prosperity

Citrine is a powerful, healing quartz that is thought to be an excellent crystal for bringing about wealth in body, mind and spirit. Known as the merchant stone, it is believed to attract abundance in ways that fortify balance, whether that balance is sought in the home, the bank account, the body, mind or spirit.

Problem solving

Clear quartz is considered the best crystal for issues you need to work through while sleeping. Before you go to sleep, hold the quartz in your hand and spend a while meditating the issue on your mind, with the express request to solve your issue via your dreams. Then place the quartz under your pillow. You may find that when you awake you will be more focused, grounded and that the issue that was previously bothering you is now crystal clear.

Stress release and insomnia

Amethyst is thought to be an excellent stone for relieving you of the stress of the day. A relaxing crystal, it also helps with insomnia and headaches. Take a glove and place it over your left ‘receiving’ hand before retiring to bed. Slip a small amethyst crystal into the glove to increase your chances of good dream recall, a good night’s rest and stress release.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

The Hows, Whys And Whats Of Sleep And Dreams

‘Sleep is the balm for hurt minds, nature’s great second course.’
William Shakespeare

Sleep is absolutely crucial for our physical, mental and emotional health and well-being. It is during sleep that we abandon conscious control of our physical body and the unconscious mind is allowed to roam free, giving rise to dreams.

Although we now know a lot more about dreams, their real purpose isn’t yet fully understood. It wasn’t until we approached the middle of the twentieth century, with the first electronic monitoring of the brain, that we began to get a clearer idea of the nocturnal adventures of the mind. For centuries it was thought that the purpose of sleep was to rest the body and the mind, but this reasoning was disproved when it was shown that both the body and mind are active during sleep. If sleep doesn’t rest the body or mind, then what is it for?

Sleep researchers may not yet have discovered the exact reason for sleep or dreams but they have discovered some fascinating things. For example, it seems that when we are asleep our brains are a bit like computers that are offline. This J. August Strindberg means they are not idle but are filing and updating the day’s activities. They take stock of your body and release a growth hormone to repair damaged tissues and stimulate growth, while the immune system gets to work on attacking any viral or bacterial infections that may be present. Some experts believe the brain also jettisons trivial information during sleep to prevent it becoming overburdened with unimportant information, but this explanation is perhaps too simplistic, as no memory can be totally eradicated.

The advent of space travel gave scientists the opportunity to prove that resting the body was not the main function of sleep. What they found instead was that prolonged periods of isolation decreased the need for sleep. In other words, the fewer stimuli received from people or external contacts during the day, the less sleep was required. It seems we have a sleep control center at the base of our brain linked with activity during wakefulness. When that gets overloaded we get tired, but if there have not been enough stimuli from the outside world, the sleep mechanism isn’t triggered. It seems, therefore, that boredom and lack of stimuli may account for many cases of insomnia. (Paradoxically, overstimulation also produces insomnia.)... Dreampedia

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Dreampedia