Meaning of Infinite Dreams | Dream Interpretation

Dream interpretations were found from 1 different sources.


Infinity (or something that seems infinite) can represent: The idea of no limits or no end.

Freedom somewhere in your life.

An extreme idea, feeling, or place (such as “the best,” “the most,” or “the brightest”).

See also: Many; Big; Space; Limit or Boundary; Extra; Increasing; God

The Curious Dreamer’s Dream Dictionary | Nancy Wagaman


Infinite | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Infinite

0 dream symbols found for this dream.

Circle

İnfinite, unending promise... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

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Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Rainbow

An infinite promise of protection from god, relative to the present storm in one’s life; see “storm”... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

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Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Sky-light

İnfinite wisdom from god... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

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Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Interpretation According To The Varying Conditions Of People

If a righteous and noble person sees himself as handcuffed or placed in a pillory* It means he will remain safeguarded against mischief and wickedness. But if the observer of such a dream is wicked it suggests that he will commit excessive sins due to which he will be doomed to hell-fire May Allah, through His infinite mercy, save us from hell-fire, Ameen.

(*Pillory: a wooden board with holes for the head and hands in which petty offenders were formerly locked and exposed to public scorn).

.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Interpretation According To The Varying Conditions Of People

If a righteous and noble person sees himself as handcuffed or placed in a pillory* It means he will remain safeguarded against mischief and wickedness. But if the observer of such a dream is wicked it suggests that he will commit excessive sins due to which he will be doomed to hell-fire May Allah, through His infinite mercy, save us from hell-fire, Ameen.

(*Pillory: a wooden board with holes for the head and hands in which petty offenders were formerly locked and exposed to public scorn).... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Dragon

A dream of sudden changes in the worldly condition, riches and treasure (Raphael). In Christian art the dragon symbolizes Satan, or sin. With the Chinese a dragon, or winged serpent, is regarded as the symbol of the Infinite Intelligence, keeping ward over the Tree of Knowledge; a dragon was also the standard of the Welsh, of the West Saxons, of the Phoenicians and of the Chinese Manchu dynasty.

The Celts use the word dragon to signify a chief, a dictator in time of danger, and probably the dream interpretation is de” ... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

Collective Unconscious

Jung describes this as the inherited potentialities of human imagination.

It is the all controlling deposit of ancestral experiences from untold millions of years, the echo of prehistoric world events to which each century adds an infinitesimal small amount of variation and differenti­ation. These primordial images are the most ancient, univer­sal, and deep thoughts of mankind.’

Jung tried to explain his observation of a strata of being in which individual minds have their collective origin in a ge­netic way. This seems unlikely, and Rupert Sheldrake sees it as a mental phenomena. Dr Maurice Bucke called it cosmic consciousness. J.B. Priestley saw it as ‘the flame of life’ which synthesised the experience of all living things and held within itself the essentials of all lives.

If we think of it as a vast collective memory of all that has existed, then we can say the life of Edgar Cayce exhibited a working relationship with it.

Such a collective level of mind would explain many things, such as telepathy, out of body experiences, life after death, which have always been puzzling because they are difficult to explain using presently known principles. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Analysis

Sigmund Freud was the founder of modern therapeutic analysis of dreams. Freud encouraged clients to relax on a couch and allow free associations to arise in con­nection with aspects of their dream. In this way he helped the person move from the surface images (manifest content) of the dream to the underlying emotions, fantasies and wishes (latent content), often connected with early childhood. Be­cause dreams use condensation—a mass of different ideas or experiences all represented by one dream image or event— Freud stated that the manifest content was meagre’ compared with the ‘richness and variety’ of latent content.

If one suc­ceeds in touching the feelings and memories usually con­nected with a dream image, this becomes apparent because of the depth of insight and experience which arises. Although ideally the Freudian analyst helps the client discover their own experience of their dream, it can occur that the analyst puts to the client readymade views of the dream. Out of this has occurred the idea of someone else ‘analysing or telling us about our dream.

Carl Jung used a different approach. He applied amplifica­tion (see entry), helped the client explore their associations, used active imagination (see entry) and stuck to the structure of the dream. Because amplification also put to the client the information and experience of the therapist, again the dreamwork can be largely verbal and intellectual, rather than experiential.

In the approach of Fritz Perls (gestalt therapy) and Moreno (psychodrama), dream analysis is almost entirely experiential.

The person exploring the dream acts out or verbalises each role or aspect of the dream.

If one dreamt of a house, in gestalt one might stan by saying I am a house’ and then go on to describe oneself just as one is as the particular house in the dream.

It is important, even if the house were one existing externally, not to attempt a description of the external house, but to stay with the house as it was in the dream. This is like amplification, except the client gives all the information. This can be a very dramatic and emotional experience because we begin consciously to touch the immense realms of experience usually hidden behind the image. When successful this leads to personal insights into behaviour and creativity. See dream processing; amplification; gestalt dream work.

dream as a meeting place Any two people, or group of people who share their dreams, particularly if they explore the associated feelings and thoughts connected with the dream images, achieve social intimacy quickly. Whether it is a family sharing their dreams, or two fnends, an environment can be created in which the most profound feelings, painful and wonderful, can be allowed. Such exposure of the usually pri­vate areas of one s feelings and fears often presents new infor­mation to the dreamer, and also allows ventilation of what may never have been consciously expressed before. In doing so a healing release is reached, but also greater self under­standing and the opportunity to think over or reconsider what is discovered.

Herbert Reed, editor of the dream magazine Sundance, and resident in Virginia Beach, Va., initiated group dreaming ex­periments. It started because Reed noticed that in the dream groups he was running, when one of the group aired a prob­lem, other members would subsequently dream about that person’s problem. He went on to suggest the group should attempt this purposely and the resulting dreams shared to see if they helped the person with the problem.

The reported dreams often formed a more detailed view of the person’s situation. In one instance the group experienced many dream images of water. It aided the woman who was seeking help to admit she had a phobia of water and to begin thinking about learning to swim. In another experiment, a woman presented the problem of indecision about what college to transfer to and what to study. Her group subsequently said they were confused because they had not dreamt about school. Several had dreams about illicit sex. though, which led the woman to admit she was having an affair with a married man. She went on to realise that it was the affair which was underlying her indecision. She chose to end the affair and further her career.

Whatever may be underlying the results of Reed’s expen- ments, it is noticeably helpful to use the basic principles he is working with. They can be used by two people equally as well as a group—by a parent and child, wife and husband, busi­nessman and employee. One sets out to dream about each other through mutual agreement. Like any undertaking, the involvement, and therefore the results, are much more pro­nounced if there is an issue of reasonable importance behind the experiment. It helps if one imagines that during sleep you are going to meet each other to consider what is happening between you. Then sleep, and on waking take time to recall any dream. Note it down, even if it seems far removed from what you expected. Then explore its content using the tech­niques in dream processing.

Example: My wife and I decided to attempt to meet in our dreams. I dreamt I was in a room similar to the back bedroom of my previous marnage. My present wife was with me. She asked me to help her move the wardrobe. It reminded me of, but did not look like, the one which had been in that bed­room. I stood with my back to it, and reached my hands up to press on the top, inside. In this way I carried it to another wall. As I put it down the wood broke. I felt it ought to be thrown away’ (Thomas B). Thomas explored the dream and found he connected feelings about his first marriage with the wardrobe and bedroom. In fact the shabby wardrobe was Tom’s feelings of shabbiness at having divorced his first wife. In his first marriage, represented by the bedroom, he always felt he was married for life. In divorcing, he had done some­thing he didn’t like and was carrying it about with him. He says ‘1 am carrying this feeling of shabbiness and second best into my present relationship, and I need to get rid of it.’

dream as a spiritual guide Dreams have always been con­nected with the spiritual side of human experience, even though today many spiritual leaders disagree with consider­ation of dreams. Because dreams put the dreamer in touch with the source of their own internal wisdom and certainty, some conflict has existed between authoritative priesthood and public dreaming.

A lay person finding their own ap­proach to God in a dream might question the authority of the priests. No doubt people frequently made up dreams about God in order to be listened to. Nevertheless, despite opposi­tion, Matthew still dreamt of an angel appearing to him, Jo­seph was still warned by God to move Jesus; Peter still dreamt his dream of the unclean animals.

The modern scientific approach has placed large question marks against the concept of the human spirit. Study of the brain’s functions and biochemical activities have led to a sense of human personality being wholly a series of biological and biochemical events.

The results of this in the relationship between doctor and patient, psychiatrist and client, some­times results in the communication of human personality be­ing of little consequence. It may not be put into words, but the intimation is that if one is depressed it is a biochemical prob­lem or a brain malfunction.

If one is withdrawn or autistic, it is not that there is a vital centre of personality which has for some reason chosen to avoid contact, but that a biochemical or physiological problem is the cause—it’s nothing personal, take this pill (to change the biochemistry, because you are not really a person). Of course we have to accept that human personality must sometimes face the tragedy of biochemical malfunction, but we also need to accept that biochemical and physiological process can be changed by human will and courage.

In attempting to find what the human spirit is by looking at dreams, creativity stands out.

The spiritual nature may not be what we have traditionally considered it to be.

An overview of dreams and how dreamers relate to them suggests one amaz­ing fact. Let us call it the ‘seashell effect’. When we hear sounds in a shell that we hold to our ear, the noises heard seem exterior to oneself, yet they are most likely amplification of sounds created in our own ear, perhaps by the passage of blood. Imagine an electronic arcade machine which the player could sit in and, when running, the player could be engulfed in images, sounds, smell and sensation. At first there is shim­mering darkness, then a sound, and lights move. Is it a face seen, or a creature. Like Rorschach’s ink blots, the person creates figures and scenes out of the shapeless light and sound.

A devil appears which terrifies the player. People, de­mons, animals, God and angels appear and fade. Scenes are clearcut or a maelstrom of movement and ill-defined activity. Events arise showing every and any aspect of human experi­ence. Nothing is impossible.

If, on stepping out, we told the player that what occurred was all their own creation due to unconscious feelings, fears, habits, thoughts and physiological processes occurring within them, like the seashell effect, they might say ‘Good God, is that all it was, and I thought it was real. What a waste of time.’

Whether we can accept it or not, as a species we have created out of our own longings, fears, pain and perhaps vi­sion, God, with many different names—politics, money, dev­ils, nationalism, angels, an, and so on and on. All of it has flowed out of us. Perhaps we even deny we are the authors of the Bible, wars, social environments. Responsibility is diffi­cult.

It is easier to believe the source is outside oneself. And if we do take responsibility for our amazing creativity, we may feel ‘is that all it is—me?’ Yet out of such things, such fears, such drives, such unconscious patterns as we shape our dreams with, we shape our life and fonune, we shape our children, we shape the world and our future.

The shadow of fear we create in our dream, the situation of aloneness and anger, becomes a pattern of feelings, real in its world of mind. We create a monster, a Djinn, a devil, which then haunts and influences us. Or with feelings of hope, of purposiveness and love, create other forces in us and the world. But we are the creator. We are in no way separate from the forces which create our existence. We are those creative forces. In the deep­est sense, not just as an ego, we create ourselves, and we go on creating ourselves. We are the God humanity has looked so long for.

The second aspect of the human spirit demonstrated by dreams is consciousness.

The unconscious mind, if its func­tion is not clogged with a backlog of undealt with painful childhood experience and nonfunctional premises, has a pro­pensity to form gestalts. It takes pieces of experience and fits them together to form a whole. This is illustrated by how we form gestalts when viewing newsprint photographs, which are made up of many small dots. Our mind fits them together and sees them as a whole, giving meaning where there are only dots. When the human mind is working well, when the indi­vidual can face a wide range of emotions, from fear and pain to ecstasy, this process of forming gestalts can operate very creatively. This is because it needs conscious involvement, and if the personality is frightened of deep feeling, the uniting of deeply infantile and often disturbing cxpcrience is cut out. Yet these areas are very rich mines of information, containing our most fundamental learning.

If the process is working well, then one’s expenence is gradually transformed into insights which transcend and thereby transform one s personal life.

For instance, we have witnessed our own binh in some manner, we also see many others appeanng as babies. We see people ageing, dying. We see millions of events in our life and in others.

The uncon­scious, deeply versed in imagery, ritual and body language, out of which it creates its dreams, picks up information from music, architecture, traditional rituals, people walking in the street, the unspoken world of parental influence.

The sources are massive, unbelievable. And out of it all our mind creates meaning. Like a process of placing face over face over face until a composite face is formed, a synthesis of all the faces; so the unconscious scans all this information and creates a world view, a concept of life and death.

The archetypes Jung talks of are perhaps the resulting synthesis of our own expenence, reaching points others have met also.

If so, then Chnst might be our impression of humanity as a whole.

If we dare to touch such a synthesis of experience it may be seanng, breathtaking.

It breaks the boundaries of our present personality and con­cepts because it transcends. It shatters us to let the new vision emerge. It reaches, it soars, like an eagle flying above the single events of life. Perhaps because of this the great hawk of ancient Egypt represented the human spirit.

Lastly, humans have always been faced by the impossible.

To a baby, walking and not wetting its pants is impossible, but with many a fall and accident it does the impossible.

It is a god in its achievement.

To talk, to fly heavier-than-air planes, to walk on the Moon, were all impossible. Humans challenge the impossible every day. Over and over they fall, back into defeat. Many lie there broken. Yet with the next moment along come youngsters with no more sense than grasshoppers, and because they don’t know what the differ­ence is between right and left, do the impossible. Out of the infinite potential, the great unknown, they draw something new. With hope, with folly, with a wisdom they gain from who knows where, they demand more. And it’s a common everyday son of miracle. Mothers do it constantly for their children—transcending themselves. Lovers go through hell and heaven for each other and flower beyond who they were. You and I grow old on it as our daily bread, yet fail to see how holy it is. And if we turn away from it, it is because it offers no certainties, gives no authority, claims no reward.

It is the spir­itual life of people on the street. And our dreams remember, even if we fail.

For this is the body and blood of the human spirit.

dream as a therapist and healer There is a long tradition of using dreams as a base for both physical and psychological healing. One of the earliest recorded incidents of such healing is when Pharaoh’s ‘spirit was troubled, and he sent for all the magicians of Egypt and all its wise men; and Pharaoh told them his dream, but there was none who could interpret it’. Then Joseph revealed the meaning of the dream and so the healing of Pharaoh’s troubled mind took place (Genesis 41).

The Greek Temples of Asclepius were devoted to using dreams as a base for healing of body and mind (see dreams and ancient Greece).

The Iroquois Amerindians used a social form of dream therapy also (see Iroquoian dream cult).

The dream process was used much more widely throughout his­tory in such practices as Pentecostal Christianity, shaktipat yoga in India, and Anton Mesmer’s groups (see sleep move­ments).

Sigmund Freud pioneered the modern approach to the use of dreams in therapy, but many different approaches have developed since his work. Examples of the therapeutic action of gaining insight into dreams are to be found in the entnes on abreaction, recurring dreams, reptiles.

The entry on dream processing gives information about using a dream to gain insight and healing. See also dream as meeting place.

A feature which people who use their dreams as a thera­peutic tool mention again and again is how dreams empower them. Many of us have an unconscious feeling that any impor­tant healing work regarding our body and mind can only be undertaken and directed by an expert, the expert might be a doctor, a psychiatrist, psychotherapist, or osteopath. Witness­ing the result of their own dream process, even if helped by an expert, people feel in touch with a wonderful internal process which is working actively for their own good. One woman, who had worked on her dream with the help of a fnend (non expert), said It gave me great confidence in my own internal process. I realised there was something powerful in myself working for my own good. It was a feeling of cooperating with life.’ One is frequently amazed by one’s own resources of wisdom, penetrating insight and sense of connection with life, as met in dreamwork. This is how dreams play a pan in helping one towards wholeness and balance.

The growing awareness of one’s central view of things, which is so wide, piercing and often humorous, brings developing self respect as the saga of one’s dreams unfolds.

There may be no hint of this, however, if a person simply records their dreams without attempting to find a deeply felt contact with their contents.

It is in the searching for associ­ated feelings and ideas that the work of integrating the many strands of one’s life begins. Gradually one weaves, through a co-operative action with the dream process, a greater unifica­tion of the dark and the light, the painful and transcendent in one’s nature.

The result is an extraordinary process of educa­tion. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Learning While Asleep

There have been many claims that one can learn while asleep—possibly with the aid of a re­corded series of suggestions or information being spoken from a speaker under one’s pillow. Different research projects have arrived at a variety of conclusions.

The major scientific con­clusion is that we do not learn from what we hear while asleep. Sleep is important in the process of learning, however.

If one learns a list of nonsense words, memory of them eight or twenty-four hours later is better if we have slept; memory eight hours later without sleep is not as efficient as twenty- four hours later with intervening sleep. This suggests memory traces are strengthened during sleep.

That we do learn, in the sense of creating new information or perception, while we sleep is generally accepted. Albert Einstein suggested that the creative scientists are those who have access to their dreams. He meant that in order to be innovative we must be able periodically to leave behind the practical everyday path of commonsense and rational thought.

The rational tends to move in areas of thought connected with what is already known.

To create something new, to find a new direction, we may need to be capable of retrieving appar­ently irrational ideas, sift them and reconstruct them in practi­cal ways.

Dreams have this ability to fantasise, to look at and experi­ence the irrational, to take an idea and move it completely out of its old setting or viewpoint. Because our mind can do this in sleep, we can touch not only our creativity, but also our ability to problem solve. As a personal test of this, try the following experiment. At the end of this explanation a prob­lem will be set.

It is one that requires no special training or information to solve.

The solution is simple and will be seen as conect when reached. But do not even begin to think about the problem until you go to bed! It would discount the experi­ment if you did. On going to bed, think about the problem for no more than 15 minutes.

If you solve the problem note how long it took.

If not, stop thinking about it and go to sleep, making the resolve to remember any dreams.

It is likely that you will dream the answer.

If not, on waking spend a funher 15 minutes trying to reach the answer.

The letters 0,T,T,F,F,-,-, form the beginning of an intelli­gible series. Add two more letters which make it obvious that an infinite number of letters could be added. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Mandala

If one could produce a graphic image of the whole of human nature, many different forms might be integrated within an overall shape, perhaps a circle or square. Also, if it were possible to have a visual presentation of a person’s inner world of mind, weaknesses, strengths, order, confusion and quality, each person would appear differently. Some would be internally jumbled, divided and ugly, others symmetrical, inte­grated and beautiful.

Because the unconscious produces dreams, and because dreams are imagery which give form to the otherwise abstract elements of internal human nature, there anse in some dreams shapes or patterns which depict an overall view of one s own inner condition. Carl Jung drew attention to the circle and square designs in some dreams, calling them man- dalas, and seeing them as representing the nucleus of the human identity. Although we are, in our everyday life, the magical and mysterious process of life, it is difficult for us actually to answer the question ‘Who am I?’ or ‘What am I?’ with any lasting conviction.

The mysterious essence of ourself is met in dreams as a circular or square object or design, as the sun, a flower, a square garden with a round pond in the middle, or a circle with a square or quartered design within it, a circle with a cross within, a revolving or flying cross-shaped object. Classi­cal symbols from all nations use this theme; and we can find it in the round table of King Arthur, in the centre of which the Holy Grail appeared; the healing sand paintings of the Na- vaho Indians, the zodiac; circle dances; stone circles; the Bud­dhist wheel of birth and death; and so on.

The circle usually symbolises a natural wholeness, our in­ner life as nature has shaped it.

The square shows wholeness we have helped shape by conscious cooperation with our m- neT world. There are two main reasons why one produces this theme in one’s dreams. It occurs in children or people meet­ing internal or external shocks, and produces a strengthening of the vulnerable identity in meeting the vaned influences they face. It arises in people who are meeting and integrating the wider life of their being existing beyond the boundaries of their usual interests, or what they allow themselves to experi­ence.

The contact with the self is then pan of an extending of awareness into what was dark or unknown, not only in our own unconscious, but in external life. In touching the nucleus of one’s being in this way, one becomes aware in some mea­sure of the infinite potential of one’s life. There is often an accompanying sense of existence in eternity and the many different mansions’ or dimensions of experience one has within the eternal. See the self under archetypes; shapes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Plot Of The Dream

In attempting to understand our dreams, it is imponant to honour their drama or plot. Dreams appear to be very specific in the way they use the characters, objects and environs occurring in them.

Example: I was walking up a steep hill on a sunny day when my husband came running down the hill with blood pouring from his right arm. He couldn’t stop running. As he passed me he called to me for help. I was happy and peaceful and ignored him. I calmly watched him running fast down the hill, then continued on my way’ (Joyce C). Out of the infinite number of situations Joyce could have dreamt about, this was the one produced. Why? There are many factors which appear to determine what we dream. How events of the day influ­enced us; what stage of personal growth we are meeting—we might be in the stage of struggling for independence; prob­lems being met; relationships, past business such as child­hood traumas still to be integrated. And so on.

If Joyce had dreamt she and her husband were walking up the hill the whole message of the dream would have been different.

If we can accept that dream images are, as Freud stated, a form of thinking, then the change in imagery would be a changed concept.

If the language of dreams is expressed in its images, then the meaning stated is specific to the imagery used.

In processing our dreams, it is therefore profitable to look at the plot to see what it suggests. It can be helpful to change the situation, as we have done with Joyce s. Imagining Joyce walking up the hill on a sunny day, arm in arm with her husband, suggests a happy relationship. This emphasises the situation of independence and lack of support for her hus­band which appears in the real dream. Seeing our dreams as if they were snatches from a film or play, and asking ourself what feelings and human situations they depict, can aid us to clarify them. As a piece of drama, Joyce’s dream says she sees, but does not respond to, her husband’s plight.

Our internal ‘dream producer’ has an amazing sense of the subtle meanings of movement, positioning, and relationship between the elements used. And some of these are subtle.

A way of becoming more aware of what information our dream contains is to use visualisation. Sit comfonably and imagine yourself back in the dream. Replay it just as it was. Remember the whole thing slowly, going through it again while awake. As you do so, be aware of what it feels like in each scene or event. What do the interactions suggest? What does it feel like in the other roles? We can even practise this with other peo­ple’s dreams.

If we imagine ourself in Joyce’s dream, and replay it just as she describes it, we may arrive at a feeling of detachment from the husband.

If we stand in the husband’s role we may feel a great need which is not responded to as we go down hill fast*. In this way we gather a great deal of unspoken’ information from dreams.

Looking at our own dreams in this way can be more diffi­cult, simply because we do not always want to see what is being said about ourself. See amplification; dream process­ing; postures, movement, body language; word analysis of dreams; settings. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Sea

Most activities which underlie our physical and mental life are beyond our awareness. Occasionally something—an ache in the chest, a strange emotion which unsettles us—may emerge into consciousness, then disappear.

The sea, with its surface and hidden depths, lends itself to depicting this hu­man experience of known and unknown regarding self.

The enormity of the sea is also a visible image of the enormity of our own inner world, most of it unknown, and also the rela­tionship we have with the universe, which we exist in yet know so little about.

The sea holds vast treasures, curiosities, and our history—not simply because life emerged from the sea. or our blood is as salt as the ancient sea, but because so many ships and shorelines are now beneath the waves. Some­times these can be recovered, and this depicts our remember­ing or making conscious.

Example: ‘My husband and I were standing looking at the sea’s surface. It was just falling night. I saw a mass of dark shapes, thought it would be a school of fish. Then we were looking at water birds, maybe ducks, again dark shapes as the light had almost gone. Then there was a hole in the sea, like a belly button, I was wondering what it was, how was it being made, was there something under the water? Something very big was coming up to the surface very close to me. It shot me to wake (Ginny Q). Ginny and her husband had been explor­ing the content of their dreams.

The image of the sea shows Ginny sensing there are enormous depths to her own being, and something big—a previously unconscious complex of in­sights and feelings—is becoming conscious.

So, generally the sea represents the boundary between un­conscious and conscious; our processes of life and the ongins of our life; the wisdom, still unverbalised because locked in process rather than insight, of our existence; source of the huge life drives, such as that which urges us towards indepen­dence, mating and parenthood, a symbol of infinite energy or consciousness, in which human existence is only a tiny pan. Example: A small speed boat was at sea. But the sea dis­solved anybody who fell in. One man fell in but held himself together as a blob of water and jumped back to the speedboat. I remember the words “The sea is a great solvent” (Tim P). Tim is aware of his unconscious sense of being a pan of the huge sea of life or energy. In it one might lose one’s sense of identity. In the end, identity is ‘held together’ by one’s own belief in oneself.

Going under the sea: bringing internal contents to con­sciousness; remembering the womb expenence; letting our ego surrender a little, looking at death.

If there is a sense of hugeness, depth: going beyond the boundaries of experience usually set up by our conscious self or ego. Waves: impulses, feelings and emotions, such as sexuality, anxiety, anger. Tide: rising and falling of feelings such as love, pleasure or sexual­ity; may refer to aging when going out; tide in our affairs. Example: *l am either standing at the edge of the sea or near, when suddenly enormous tidal waves appear in the distance and are coming closer. I know they will engulf me, I turn and run away. Sometimes they do overtake me, other times I wake up’ (Mrs AV). We can run from pleasure and wider insight, just as much as from pain or fear. Idioms: all at sea, plenty more fish in the sea, lost at sea. See beach; fish, sea crea­tures. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Day

Confidence; infinite possibilities (the whole day lies ahead). Increasing awareness.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

Temple

also sec Church Buildings

1- Often in dreams a temple can signify our own body.

It is something to be treated with reverence and care. It has the same significance as a church since it is an object built to honour and pay respect to a god or gods.

2- Psychologically, wherever there is a temple there is a sense of awe associated with creativity. Perhaps the biggest significance in dreams is the fact that it takes many to build one temple. This links with our awareness of Lhe many facets of our personality which go to make a coherent whole.

3- Both as a sanctuary for human beings and as a place where the Divine resides, a temple reflects the bcautv of Heaven.

It is a microcosm (small picture) of what is, after all, infinite.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Fair

Vision: Being at a fair: either a profitable connection or a good business transaction is in the making. You will see an infinite number of things at the fair, but don’t let that confuse you. See Shopping.

Depth Psychology: Dreaming about a fair is a warning either about making unnecessary purchases or about being superficial. Is it hard for you to be alone? Do you need constant diversion or stimulation? Are you addicted to spending money, to shopping?... Dreamers Dictionary

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Dreamers Dictionary

Abundance

Dreams of abundance symbolize that conditions of wealth abound, and that love, success, fortune, and good things are coming into your life. You are awakening to your infinite nature. See Wish Fulfillment Dreams.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Ball

Dreams of a ball are associated with play, games, and friendly competition.

If you have a ball, then it is your turn to make a move.

If the ball is in someone else’s court, then wait until they make a move.

A ball also represents the circular, infinite cyclical nature of life, the world, the globe, wholeness and completion.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Divine

Dreams of something or someone that is divine symbolize being of the spirit, and perhaps able to see the future. You are tapping into your infinite source, supply, and consciousness, seeing beyond your fear and limited views. See Prophetic Dreams or Precognitive Dreams.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

God

Dreams of god represent your connection to your ultimate power source and the infinite, unconditional love intelligence that governs the universe. You are feeling sourced, empowered, filled with grace and miracles as you awaken to your highest nature and creative expression. This dream may be an opportunity for you to process your issues with God, religion, dogma, and your spirituality. See Energy and Light.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Integrity

One of the main purposes of your dreams is to help you to become integrated, so that you ultimately might embrace the infinite, whole being that you are. See Integration Dreams.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Lid

Dreams of a lid symbolize protection, hiding, rigid belief systems, limitation, and preservation. This lid could represent that which keeps you from experiencing your infinite nature and freedom. Consider the feeling tone.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Meditation

If you dream of meditating, this represents objectivity, clarity, lucidity and a desire to become awake and conscious in the dream state. You are in an advanced level of -awareness, and are connecting with your infinite source of guidance, support, direction, and solutions.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Multiplex

If you dream of a multiplex cinema or shopping mall are about your multidimensional self, reminding you of how many opinions are always available to you. Your subconscious mind is telling you to get out of your rut and expand your possibilities in this infinite and abundant universe.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Need

Dreams of needing something or someone indicate issues of -worth. Perhaps it is time to differentiate your “needs” from your “wants”. Keep in mind that the infinite divine source is ever available.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Observatory

Dreams of an observatory signify an objective look at your life, -reflection, and an awareness of your infinite nature and star-like qualities. See Star.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Outer Space

Dreams of outer space symbolize your awareness of the infinite nature of the world, solar system, and universe. This dream is expanding the parameters of your normal, everyday thinking, and offering you solutions, inspiration and a higher vision.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Rich

If you dream of being rich then you are coming into your natural inheritance, your true abundance, and infinite, expansive nature. You are in the process of preparing for material and spiritual success in your life. See Wish Fulfillment Dreams.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Secret Society

Dreams of a secret society represent power, mystery, and that you are being initiated into deeper realms of your infinite nature. This dream may be cautioning you to be mindful of how you use your personal power. Also, you are being cautioned to be responsible of your part in the collective power that is generated when you participate with a zealous group of individuals. See Brotherhood and Ceremony.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Shaman

Dreaming about a wise, interdimensional healer/medicine man represents your desire to evoke more of your own innate healing wisdom. You are connecting with your own inner spiritual source and infinite wellspring of talent, power and passion. See Prophetic Dreams.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Solar Power

Dreams of solar power represent that you are maximizing your personal resources and tapping into your infinite spiritual source that doesn’t run out.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Sunrise

A dream of a sunrise symbolizes a new beginning, infinite opportunity, and that new ideas are beginning to dawn upon you. See Sun and Light.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Water

Dreams about water are associated with emotions, sexuality, cleansing, healing and that you are exploring the infinite depth of your unconscious mind. You are connecting with the essence of your being, and are going with the flow. Because water is associated with the cycles of the tides, it is also associated with your feminine energy. So, if you dream of water spilled all over the floor, then this represents that your feminine side, emotions or creativity are feeling out of control.

If water is contained in a glass or jar, then you may be feeling that your feminine side, emotions or creativity is being suppressed.

If water is flowing, as in through a hose or river, then this symbolizes that you feminine side, emotions and creativity is in full flow. Keep in mind, that you are, after all, comprised of 90% water. See Moon or Ocean.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Chaos

Before the universe began it was thought there existed a disordered state of unformed matter and infinite space. Spiritually therefore in dreams chaos is a representation of source and the beginning of all things. There is, though, an underlying pattern, which may not be immediately apparent.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

Temple

Both as a sanctuary for human beings and as a place where the divine resides, a temple reflects the beauty of heaven.

It is a microcosm (small picture) of what is, after all, infinite.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

Mansion

Tremendous potential within the self. “In my Father’s house are many mansions,” many talents, abilities and levels of consciousness you have not even begun to explore. As you learn to know yourself, the infinite nature of being, your true gifts, you will begin to utilize creative potential. Most of us are living in log cabins. Would you believe ant hills?... The Dream Books Symbols

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The Dream Books Symbols

Fetus

A fetus is a developmental stage in the life of any animal whose young are gestated inside the mother’s body. In this stage, all creatures resemble one another, so one of the significant distinctions about a fetus is that it contains a sense of infinite possibility in terms of what it is going to become. In this way, a fetus is an idea, a direction, a new path, or a concept that has yet to even be birthed. An aborted fetus is such an idea that is terminated before it can even reveal what it might have grown into.

(See Abortion.)... Complete Dictionary of Dreams

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Complete Dictionary of Dreams

Holy Grail

The Holy Grail is a sacred object from the Christian tradition that is thought to have been the goblet used by Christ at the Last Supper.

The metaphysical emphasis on this as a symbol connects to the feminine shape of any goblet as a container for the energy of the Divine.

If this appears in your dream, you may be experiencing a connection to powerful spiritual impulses.

If your personal religious affiliations are in this direction, such an image may have more meaning for you. At the heart of this symbol is the idea that a human being is a vessel for God’s infinite love.... Complete Dictionary of Dreams

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Complete Dictionary of Dreams

Horizon

The horizon is expansive and limitless as well as finite and constricted.

It is the fixed point that is not fixed at all but ever changing, even as it seems to remain the same.

The horizon is a symbol of the experience of nature as infinite and limited at the same time, which is why in life it inspires such awe and wonder. As a symbol in a dream, it reminds you of this part of your existential nature.

A dream that features the horizon is asking you to consider the higher elements of your nature.... Complete Dictionary of Dreams

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Complete Dictionary of Dreams

Infinity

The principle of infinity is something that is a feature of a particular sort of dream that can take many different forms. In a general sense, a dream of infinity features a landscape that feels extremely large and infinitesimally small at the same time. Such a dream is a spiritual calling that is asking you to wake up to the mystical nature of life.... Complete Dictionary of Dreams

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Complete Dictionary of Dreams

Numbers

You are tapping into your structural thinking and getting a glimpse of the building blocks of all reality. Math and numbers are behind all of how life is constructed.

The movements of the earth, moon, and other planets are geometrical in nature. Music is simply math expressed as tone. Digital technology reduces various data to numeric sequences and then converts it back to its original form. Our need to describe physical phenomena led us to create nine whole numbers that, in different sequences, can express anything from gravity, to the speed of light, to the way visitors can identify which house on the block is yours. When a number is featured in a dream, there is a rich symbolic meaning hidden in it. You can use the fundamentals of numerology as a way to understand what a dream with numbers might mean.

If there is more than one digit involved, add all the values together until you arrive at a final single number. For example, if an address is 115 Main Street, you would add one plus one plus five and get seven. There is an elegant evolution present in the archetypal interpretation of the numerical sequence, which can be considered a sort of journey. We started the journey alone in the infinite (one), discovered opposites and relativity (two), invented creativity (three), built a foundation (four), expressed freedom (five), partnered with another (six), went inward to find spirituality (seven), and expressed and enjoyed the rewards of the outside world (eight), and now we come to a close (nine). Each of these numbers is elaborated upon in the individual entries.... Complete Dictionary of Dreams

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Complete Dictionary of Dreams

Playing Cards

Dreams that contain cards are related to working with patterns and all the permutations that are possible when you understand the underlying structure of how life works. Cards are numbered and suited, and through working with these categories, an almost infinite number of possibilities exists. This is an analogy for how life itself works. In this way, playing cards are like a testing ground for becoming more skillful in playing the game of life.... Complete Dictionary of Dreams

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Complete Dictionary of Dreams

Tarot Cards

If a specific tarot card appears in your dream the following abbreviated list of the classic meanings of each card might help with your interpretation:

The Major Arcana

0- The Fool

A jester figure representing impulse, birth and youth, sometimes shown beginning a journey and accompanied by a dog.

If this card appears in your dreams, it stands for a new start and infinite possibilities. When it appears, you might be about to make a move, not just to a new home, but to a new job or way of thinking. There is more than just change, renewal and a brand new beginning in the Fool; there’s also movement, and a fresh, exciting new time. But the card carries a little bark of warning as well. Stop daydreaming and fantasizing and watch your step, lest you fall and end up looking the fool.

1- The Magician

Sometimes shown as a juggler or illusionist at a fair, sometimes playing with the symbols of the four suits, representing consciousness, a sense of self-control and dexterity. In dreams, this card might be telling you that you will have a vision, an idea or a magical mental image of whatever it is you most want, whether it is the solution to a problem, a successful career or a fulfilling love life.

2- High Priestess

Shown as a female religious leader, representing women’s liberation, wisdom, independence and psychic development. The High Priestess is the card of knowledge, instinct and the supernatural. She offers secret knowledge, like the moon on a dark night, so that you can find your path in life. She sits between the pillars of dark and light, consciousness and unconsciousness, waxing and waning. All secret knowledge is hers.

3- Empress

Shown as a queen on a throne or as the mother goddess, she represents illumination, intelligence, understanding, maternity and creativity. The Empress is a creator, be it the creation of life, of romance, of art or business. This card tells you that if you want your new romance, career, business or creation to grow into all it can be, you have to pay attention to it, baby it and be willing to let it take those first steps when it is ready. Most of all, like any pregnant mother or good gardener, you have to be patient. All things need time to gestate and sprout.

4- Emperor

Sometimes shown as a king on a throne holding a sphere and scepter, he represents sight, vision, realization, power and strength. In the best of circumstances, he signifies the leader that everyone wants to follow because he rules with intelligence and enthusiasm. But sometimes that throne can also be a trap, a responsibility that has the Emperor feeling restless, bored and discontent.

5- Hierophant or Pope

A religious leader, sometimes shown as the Pope seated on a throne, he represents the link between God and man, and symbolizes spiritual discovery, the father, transcendence, and the teacher. The Hierophant’s only problem is that he can be stubborn. At his best, he is wise and soothing, offering much-needed advice; at his worst, he is an unbending traditionalist.

6- Lovers

Shown as two people surrounded by cupids, flowerbeds, they represent struggle, beauty, sovereignty and, union. Above all, this card is a symbol of choice. Love is a force that makes you choose and decide for reasons you often can’t understand; it makes you surrender control to a higher power. When this card appears in a dream, you are being told to trust your instincts, to choose this career, challenge, person or thing to which or whom you are so strongly drawn, no matter how scary, how difficult, irrational or troublesome.

7- Chariot

Sometimes shown as warriors parading triumphant in chariot or an icon of a hero being paraded around, it represents victory, the domination of humankind over nature, power, war and self-control.

If this card appears in your dream, it suggests that control is required over opposing emotions, wants, needs, people or circumstances; it is urging you to bring them together and give them a single direction, your direction. The card can indicate new motivation or inspiration that gets a stagnant situation moving again.

8- Strength or Lust

Represents love as a source of strength, endurance, will to survive, strong desires and perseverance. In dreams, this card suggests that you can control not only the situation, but also yourself. It is a card about anger and impulse management, about creative answers, leadership and maintaining your integrity. It can also stand for a steadfast friend.

9- Hermit

Often shown as a hermit holding an hourglass, the hermit represents withdrawal, solitude, abandonment of convention via inner conviction and a preoccupation with details,. This is not a time for socializing; the card indicates, instead, a desire for peace and solitude. Nor is it a time for action, discussion or decisions; it is a time to think, organize, ruminate and take stock. There may be feelings of frustration and discontent during this time of withdrawal. But such times lead to enlightenment, illumination and clarity.

10- Wheel of Fortune

Represents karma, reincarnation, the consequences of chance happenings, cycles, optimism and generosity. This card can mean movement, change and evolution, but its primary meaning is that such changes will seem to come out of the blue as a stroke of good, unexpected fortune.

11- Justice

Often shown as ‘lady justice’ (blindfolded with scale), representing decision, equilibrium. Justice is about cold, objective balance through reason or natural force. This is the card that tells a person they can’t keep smoking and drinking without consequences to their health. It is the card that advises cutting out waste and insists that you make adjustments, do whatever is necessary to bring things back into balance, physically, emotionally, socially and spiritually.

12- Hanged Man

Represents sacrifice, violence, transition. Sometimes you need to sacrifice cherished positions, opening yourself to other truths and other perspectives in order to find solutions. One thing is certain; whether the insight is great or small, spiritual or mundane, once you have been the Hanged Man in your dreams, you never see things in quite the same way again.

13- Death

Often shown as a skeleton or the Grim Reaper, this card represents stagnation and routine, but also fresh starts, a clean slate, liberation and renewal. This is a time of change, a time for something to end, but also a time for something new to begin. You may feel sad, empty or low, but that will help you rise again, like a phoenix from the ashes. Death is not the end. It is only the precursor to resurrection.

14- Temperance

This card represents enthusiasm, moderation, truthfulness, the mixing of opposite ingredients in proper proportion, and working together. Temperance may, at first glance, be a warning to ‘temper’ or modify your behavior, to cut your wine with water. But it may also be a reminder that seemingly irreconcilable opposites may not be irreconcilable at all.

15- The Devil

Perhaps the most misunderstood of all the major Arcana, the Devil is not really ‘Satan’ at all, but Pan, the half-goat nature god, or Dionysus, the god of wine and licentiousness. This card represents superficiality, confusion, ignorance, apathy, limitations, frustrations and sexual problems. These are gods of pleasure and abandonment, of wild behavior and unbridled desires. This card is about ambition, but is also synonymous with temptation and addiction. On the flip side, however, the card can be a warning to someone who is too restrained, someone who never allows themselves to get passionate, messy or wild- or even ambitious.

16- The Tower

Representing spiritual awakening, destiny, often shown as a ‘house of god’ or a ruins, the Tower is a card about war. This war is between the tangled structures of lies and the lightning flash of truth.

If this card appears in your dreams, you can expect to be shaken up or to be blinded by a shocking revelation. It sometimes takes such a shock to make you see a truth that you refuse to confront, or to challenge and destroy beliefs that are well constructed and deeply defended. What is most important to remember is that the tearing down of this structure, however painful, makes room for something new to be built.

17- The Star

Often shown as a woman kneeling on a sea shore, this card suggests clarity of vision and spiritual insight, and represents meditation, inspiration, hope, immortality. Most importantly, it suggests that unexpected help will be coming, but that help is only the first step. The star only reveals the future. It is up to you to find your way to that future.

18- The Moon

A card that is connected with sleep, and so both with dreams and with nightmares, the Moon represents illusion, self-deception, confusion and the growth of intuition. It is a scary card in that it warns that there might be hidden enemies, tricks and falsehoods. It should also be remembered that this is a card of great creativity, of powerful magic, primal feelings and intuition.

If this image appears in your dreams, you may be going through a time of emotional and mental trial. This time however, can also result in great creativity, psychic powers, visions and insight. You can and should trust your intuition.

19- The Sun

Just as the moon symbolized inspiration from the unconscious or from dreams, this card symbolizes discoveries made fully conscious whilst wide awake, and represents enlightenment, clarity, understanding, comprehension, wisdom, happiness and splendor. It is a card of intellect, clarity of mind, and feelings of youthful energy, as well as symbolizing science and math, beautifully constructed music and carefully reasoned philosophy.

20- Judgment

Often showing angels blowing trumpets, this card represents awakening to something new and rebirth. There are wounds from the past that may not have healed and Judgment advises you to finally face these, recognize that the past is past, and put them to rest, absolutely and irrevocably. This is also a card of healing, quite literally from an accident or illness, as well as a card signaling great transformation, renewal and change.

21- The World or Universe

Simply put, this card tells you that a successful conclusion to a long-term project is in sight, and that it will be accompanied by well-earned praise, celebration and success. It represents completion, reward, perfection, a unity of positive and negative, and, on a more mundane level, the World card indicates travel. These are not short business trips, but long, fantastic trips. This is a wonderful card of wholeness, perfection, satisfaction and happiness.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

Journeys Out Of The Body

Some of the earliest research into OBEs was conducted by Frenchman Yarm Louis Forham (1884-1917), who believed that everyone was capable of astral travel in a variety of guises, recording his observations in Practical Astral Travel. Forham claimed to have made astral visits to a woman he later married and to have experienced astral sex. Between 1902 and 1938, Englishman Oliver Fox took research into OBEs one step further when he claimed to have succeeded in inducing OBEs with lucid dreaming (see INTRODUCTION). He published his discoveries in 1920 in the journal English Occult Review and later in a book, Astral Projection. A fellow Englishman and OBE investigator, J. H. M. Whiteman claimed to have had thousands of OBEs, sometimes in the form of a woman or a child, between 1931 and 1953, which he described in The Mystical Life.

Robert A. Monroe (1915-1995), former television executive of Westchester County, New York, attracted widespread interest in OBEs from both the public and the scientific community when he published his account of OBEs in Journeys out of the Body (1971). His interest in OBEs had been triggered in 1958 when he began having spontaneous OBEs in his sleep. In his book, he described the experience as follows: "In 1958, without any apparent cause, I began to float out of my physical body.

It was not voluntary; I was not attempting any mental feats. It was not during sleep, so I couldn’t dismiss it as simply a dream. I had full, conscious awareness of what was happening, which of course only made it worse. I assumed it was some sort of hallucination caused by something dangerous—a brain tumor, or impending mental illness. Or imminent death. It occurred usually when I would lie down or relax for rest or preparatory to sleep—not every time but several times weekly. I would float up a few feet above my body before I became aware of what was happening. Terrified, I would struggle through the air and back into my physical body. Try as I might, I could not prevent it from recurring."

In his books, Monroe sets out an astonishing range of experience, some of which was unpleasant and involved meeting entities or thought forms that attacked him. He also described an overwhelmingly powerful energy: meeting the astral forms of other humans and sexual experiences on the astral level. He outlines his belief that there were various levels of existence in the OBE state. Locale I is earth, the here and now. Locale II is the infinite astral plane where everyone goes to sleep and dreams, and where countless entities exist. <p>Locale III transcends space and time and is a parallel universe. In his writings, Monroe described a technique for triggering out-of-body states and here is a brief description of it:

  • First lie down in a darkened room in a relaxing position.
  • Loosen your clothing and remove all jewelry.
  • Enter a very relaxed state and consciously tell yourself that you will remember everything that happens to you.
  • Begin breathing through your half open mouth.
  • Concentrate on an object.
  • When other images start to enter your mind, just passively watch them.
  • Try to clear your mind and observe your field of vision through your closed eyes.
  • Do nothing more for a while.
  • Simply look through your closed eyelids at the blackness in front of you.
  • After a while, you may notice light patterns.
  • When these cease, you will enter a state of such relaxation that you lose all awareness of the body.
  • You are almost in the state where your only source of stimulation will be your own thoughts.
  • It is in this relaxed and refreshed condition that out-of-body journeys are triggered.
  • To leave your body, think of yourself getting lighter and of how nice it would be to float upwards.
  • With sufficient practice, Monroe claims that a wide variety of experiences can occur.

If Monroe’s theories are correct, the implications for dream interpretation would be enormous. Even though surveys suggest that one quarter of the population believes they have had an OBE, recent research on OBEs has been inconclusive. This may be because OBEs vary from individual to individual. Laboratory tests have been equally inconclusive, even with individuals who claim to be able to project out of body at will. Tests with animals have been a little more promising, with kittens showing a change in behavior during out-of-body efforts to comfort them; skeptics, however, argue that this was achieved through telepathy or clairvoyance. Although OBE’s cannot be disproved, to date there has been no solid evidence that anyone has actually left their body during sleep or while dreaming.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

Blue

Blue is a cool, calming color, often used for relaxation and meditation. Historically, it bears associations with spirituality and is representative of truth, intellect, and justice. Within the world of dreams, blue is often thought to be a symbol of the conscious mind, especially if the dream features blue skies. A shimmering bright blue may suggest feelings of well-being and tranquility.

Muddy shades of blue may denote depression or moodiness. A darker shade of blue points more to the unconscious and a readiness to liberate yourself from repressed feelings. Dark angry blue may suggest feelings of isolation and an undependable character.

If you see anyone wearing dark blue in your dream, it should act as a general warning not to be too trusting in waking life.

If someone paints with the color blue on you, you may be deceived by someone you trusted.

Clear blue water in a dream is often interpreted as a sign that the dreamer should pay attention to their emotional needs because blue, as with color in general, is a symbol of the emotions. The appearance of a blue precious stone may indicate freedom from a particular burden in waking life. Blue clothes are linked to notions of masculinity and the male part of the dreamer’s psyche. Pale blue is traditionally the color in which baby boys are clothed, so, if you are about to become a parent, could you be thinking about a baby son? Light blue reflects the vastness of space, the sky and the infinite possibilities of spiritual development. It represents moral values and high standards, open-mindedness, intellect and steadfastness of purpose, so, if you have decided on a particular course of action, its appearance in your dream may be a positive signal from your unconscious that you should trust your decision.

Blue birds represent hope and liberation. Blue smoke is connected to new projects and a beautiful blue vase may suggest that you are in a state of emotional contentment. When this color appears in your dreams, it is probably a message from your subconscious telling you to relax, think things through and take things one step at a time. Depending on the context of your dream, the color blue may also be a metaphor of ‘being blue’ and feeling sad; you may, however, want to take off ‘into the blue’ to enjoy a more adventurous, unpredictable existence? Keywords: truth, intellect, communication, wisdom, heaven, eternity, devotion, tranquility, loyalty and openness.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

Zero

In dreams, zero denotes timelessness, super-consciousness, eternity and absolute freedom. It also symbolizes spirituality. Because it is linked in shape with seeds and eggs, it also suggests potential yet to be realized.

If zero appears to the right of other numbers, it multiplies them by ten and therefore indicates abundance or infinite potential and possibilities. Alternatively, a zero is without value or substance on its own and may be a symbol of desolation and loneliness. The more mystic interpretation suggests that zero is a symbol of the unconscious, the feminine and the great mother archetype. In Tarot, zero is the unnumbered card, the Fool, which is also a symbol of the unconscious mind. Its associated shape is the circle or the mandala.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

Interpreting Your Dreams

Interpreting your dreams can be a lot of fun. As we’ve said, it can also give you valuable insight. Dreams are like coded messages from your unconscious mind. When you decode them, you gain access to a wealth of intuitive wisdom.

Remember that only you can interpret your dreams. Many people have published “Dream Dictionaries” that describe what each part of the dream symbolizes. Actually, the same dream can have infinite meanings, depending on the person who dreamed it. The important thing is, what does it mean to YOU?

Interpreting dreams isn’t something you can pick up and become an expert at right away. It takes time and practice. First, keep the following things in mind:

  • Dreams are the reaction of the inner self to daytime activity and often show the way out of the dilemma. So relate them to current activity, because dreams may be retrospective as well as prospective.
  • Observe carefully recurrent dreams, as well as the serially progressive ones. These often illustrate progress or failure.
  • Be practical in your interpretations. Always look first for a lesson. What have you refused to face or been ignoring?
  • Dreams come to guide and help, not to amuse. They direct your attention to errors of omission and commission and offer encouragement for right endeavors. They also give us the opportunity to pray for others and to help them bear their burdens.
  • Look for past-life experiences in your dreams. These manifest themselves not only in color, but in the proper costume and setting of their period. They come to warn you against repeating the same old mistakes; to explain your relationship and reactions to certain people and places; to reduce your confusions; to enable you to better understand life.
  • Dreams that are unchanged through the years indicate the dreamer’s resistance to change.The difficulty most people have with interpreting their own dreams is that they aren’t objective enough. Their familiarity with the people and places in their dreams obscures the dreams meaning. Experts have come up with the “I AM and I NEED” formula, devised to overcome this. Here’s how it works.
    Once you have your dream written on paper, get two different colored pens. Using one color, underline every negative word or phrase in the dream which indicates limitation, disrespect, containment, avoidance or damage.
    Using the other color, underline every positive word or phrase. You now make two lists. List the negative words and phrases under a column titled I AM. List the positive words and phrases under a column titled I NEED. You are almost ready to interpret your dream.

Determine the subject matter of the dream. The location where the dream takes place is one of the best methods for doing this. When you have determined the subject matter take each of the phrases or words in the ‘I AM’ column and fit them into the following sentence.

When it comes to my (subject matter)
I AM (phrase or keyword)

Change the phrase or keyword slightly to force the sentence to make sense. If you cannot determine the subject matter apply the keywords to yourself in general. This exercise tells you how you feel or react to the subject matter of the dream. When you have done this read through the ‘I NEED’ column to learn what you must do to correct the problem. To get the meaning put each of the phrases or keywords into the sentence,

When it comes to my (subject matter)
I NEED (phrase or keyword)

Let’s take an example. Using the sentence ‘The dead woman lay on the cold hard slab’. The negative keywords are; dead, cold and hard. Women, in dreams, can represent emotions so in this case the sentences constructed would be

  • When it comes to my emotions I am dead.
  • When it comes to my emotions I am cold.
  • When it comes to my emotions I am hard.

The meaning is obvious. With analyzing just one sentence from a dream we have learned a lot about the dreamer. Using this technique you now have all of the information you need to start interpreting your dreams. However it takes practice to be able to apply what you have learned. Be patient with your efforts.

Not all dream interpretations will be that cut and dried, but it is a way to remain objective when you are analyzing what your dreams mean and how best to put the messages they are conveying to good use in your life.

Keep in mind that Most dreams are * NOT * precognitive, and once one learns the subtle differences between a precognitive dream versus a regular dream, they are easily discernable and will put your mind at ease.

The first thing everyone should consider is the typical universal symbology of the dream images. For instance, death symbolizes the end of something that’s ready for change, and a new beginning. Most people start out highly resistive to changes of any sort, and see any upcoming change in their life as something foreboding and scary. Death dreams are usually about change.

The symbols and what they represent is the most fascinating part of dream interpretation. There are literally hundreds of them. We don’t have the space to address ALL of them, but we will touch on some of the most recurring themes in dreams as well as the symbols of those dreams and what they mean.... Dreampedia

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Dreampedia

We Are Interdimensional Beings

Dreams begin to awaken us to the fact that we are spiritual or interdimensional beings, in the third dimension, or time- space, but not of it. They are like a letter from the higher self to the conscious mind. They awaken us to higher resources of knowledge within ourselves, giving us information on what is happening in our daily lives and how to meet and move through the problems that face us. Dreams also give us information on the future, so we are forced to ask, “How could I know a thing like that?”

A dream helps us realize that we are here only temporarily on the stage of waking reality. What we call life is really a school. There are many schools or levels of consciousness in the universe, and earth is one of the most important. During our sojourn here we are learning more about the true nature of our beings. We are learning that we are infinite creative energy or love energy, and that all of our hurts, disappointments and disillusions come from a failure to recognize this truth of who and what we are.

The name of the game is growth. In all our experiences we either go through or grow through them. If we just go through them, then we will repeat them again and again until we learn the lesson behind the appearances. If we grow through them, we are free to move on to the next step in the learning process. But to understand more about the game of growing and learning, we will look at two age old concepts: karma and reincarnation.... Dreampedia

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Dreampedia

Working With Dreams

How to Remember a Dream
Everyone of us can learn to remember dreams. This, of course, is a prerequisite to working with dream symbols. After you are reliably recalling dreams, you can begin to program them for problem solving.

The most effective way to work with dreams is to keep a dream journal. Date each entry as you go along, for you will begin to see patterns and recurring themes as the weeks go by. If you do not understand an important dream message, you will be given more dreams trying to get the same point across. So do not worry about losing a big lesson; you will be given the message again and again until you finally get the idea. The most important thing in learning to remember a dream is your intent to do so.

Before going to sleep sit on the side of your bed (if you lie down you may fall asleep before you finish the process), take several deep breaths and relax. Then say to yourself, “Tonight I want to remember a dream and I will remember a dream. As soon as I awaken I will write it down.” Then go to sleep with a pad and pencil beside your bed, expecting to remember and write down a dream as soon as you open your eyes. If you prefer, record your dream on a cassette tape recorder.

When you awaken, whether at 3:00 a.m. or right before getting up the next morning, immediately record any impressions, images, or feelings about the dream. If you do not usually remember dreams, you may have only a vague sense about it: a feeling of frustration, uplift, concern, peace. Just write down whatever you sense in the waking moment. If you have good recall of most of the dream images, put down everything in as much detail as possible: people, vehicles, scenery, objects, colors, shapes, numbers and so on.

If you do not immediately write down the dream, you will lose it. Do not think that you can go back to sleep and remember it later. You are in an altered state of consciousness, that half-awake half-asleep state when you first open your eyes. Until you learn to build bridges between levels of consciousness, you will not be able to recall your dream once you are fully awake. That is why you tell yourself you will remember and write down the dream.

By continuing to practice this technique of writing down material, bringing it back from superconscious to conscious mind, you are learning to bridge the gap between levels of consciousness.

You dream all during the night, but often your best teaching dreams occur between 3:00 and 5:00 a.m. or right upon awakening. Of course, if you are working the night shift and sleep during the day, your dream schedule will be adjusted to your biological rhythms. But dreams can come at any time whether during a nap in the afternoon or a catnap after dinner.

Using Dreams for Problem Solving
Even if you do not consciously use dreams for problem solving, you no doubt have had the experience of waking up in the morning with a clear and simple answer to a problem. You may not even remember a dream, but you know what to do in the situation at hand. This technique has been used for centuries to get insight. The conscious mind can struggle and wrestle with a problem, but when it is released to the superconscious mind, the greater infinite resources of consciousness, the answer effortlessly appears.

Deliberately programming your dreams for answers to problems, however, is taking even more control of the dream state and letting it work for you.

To use dreams for problem solving, again sit on the side of your bed before going to sleep. Take several deep breaths, relax, and bring the problem to mind. Whether it concerns relationships, career, health, inspiration for a creative project, or whatever, go over in your mind all the different parts of the problem that seem relevant. You have already thought about it, reflected upon it, but you are not sure which is the best direction, or the most positive solution. Feel into the problem as well as mentally reviewing it. Now mentally repeat, “Tonight I will have and remember a dream containing information for the solution to this problem. The problem concerns . . . (and briefly describe it as objectively as possible). I will now have this dream, and will recall, understand, and record it upon awakening. I open myself to the highest possible insight and guidance.” Then go to sleep, completely releasing the situation from your mind, resting in the expectation that you will receive the answer.

As soon as you awaken write down everything you can remember. Write down any general sense of the dream, feelings, impressions, as well as images. You may awaken with a clear recall of a dream which, upon analysis, gives a very definite answer. You may awaken with a strong sense of just knowing what to do. Or, sometime during the day, something in waking reality may trigger an image or impression from the dream, and you have your answer.

You may recall a dream that you cannot seem to figure out. Just record it, and continue the process the following night.

Avoid telling yourself that the process is not working, however. It is working; you just do not yet understand it. So if you do not have the answer you want upon awakening, do another little relaxation before starting your day. Suggest to yourself: “I have completely released this problem or situation to a higher wisdom within me. This answer is now presenting itself to me. I am open and receptive.” Then dismiss the concern from your mind. Holding on to it or worrying about it will block your insight. If you do not get the answer during the day, repeat the programming pro-cedure again before going to sleep. You should have the answer to any problem within a three day period.

Some people have said to me: “But I have tried to program dreams and it just did not work.” There may be a variety of reasons. First, anything that affects the chemistry of the body significantly—alcohol, drugs, barbiturates, Valium, sleeping pills—may completely botch dream recall. Your dreams will not be clear if you are able to remember them at all. A full meal right before going to sleep also affects dream life in a negative way.

Second, it is important to be relaxed when programming or asking for a dream. Do deep breathing and relax your body. Still the conscious mind enough to focus on the programming technique. Feel the desire to problem solve or get insight from your dreams. Don’t just mouth the words. You want the feeling of the heart center but the detachment and clarity of the third eye, so you are not reacting emotionally. Love yourself for creating the situation. It is a valuable teacher. Love yourself for now desiring to resolve and move beyond it. Love all persons involved for helping you learn and get to know yourself. When you approach problem solving through love, the answers are more readily available to you.

Third, ask yourself, “Do I really want to know what is best? Or am I trying to dictate the answer? Am I really open to the best and highest solution, or am I blocking my receptivity through fear?” Sometimes we ask for things that we really do not want to know. Particularly if the problem involves a decision over a major transition—leaving a relationship, changing jobs, taking self-responsibility—we may not really want to hear it. Ask, and you shall receive. But the asking must be an honest, open asking.

Finally, you may not be asking the right question. Questions should always have to do with insight into self, not how to change or manipulate others. If you are asking how to get your spouse to stop drinking, you are starting in the wrong place. Instead, realize that it is his or her responsibility to change, and all the love and support in the world may not be enough to help. The question should be: why have I created this situation for myself? What in myself needs to be changed to enable me to have a love-filled, joyous life? Through a need to be needed, a martyr syndrome, poor self- image or a number of other things, you may feel stuck in a situation. You can be assured of only one thing: with genuine self-insight the situation will change. You may have to leave it, you may not. But above all you must desire wisdom, not limiting ideas about self and others.

Remember the greatest thing we can do for another is to honor his or her inner power to make decisions and choose the kind of life he or she wants to live. We are all free to make our own mistakes. That is the only way we learn. When you are too concerned with shaping up someone else’s life, you can be sure you are copping out on your own lessons. If you are saying to yourself, “If so and so would just change, then I would be fine,” that is handwriting on the wall that you are avoiding self-responsibility.

So, ask for insight into self. Release others to learn their own lessons. You certainly can pray for others and send them love. But do so in the way that you are honoring their higher self, giving them the energy and freedom to make their own decisions, to determine their best life path, whether or not it may include you and your expectations and desires.

Kinds of Dreams
There are six basic kinds of dreams, and often you will remember snatches from several of them. As you begin to work with dreams more and more, you will recognize the differences and determine the value each is offering you. I call these different dreams clearing house or clutter, teaching, problem solving, precognitive, prophetic or visionary, and outside interference.

Clearing house
These dreams clean out the input from the day, sorting through mental and emotional clutter, rerunning experiences. Often the mind is still running a mile a minute when you first try to go to sleep. You are worried, anxious, stressful. These dreams begin the process of releasing useless concerns and integrating helpful ones. They help body and mind begin to relax.

If you meditate before going to sleep, stilling and focusing the mind, the clutter dreams are usually unnecessary. If you practice briefly rerunning the day in your mind, blessing, releasing and forgiving self and others, you are ready for a higher level of awareness in the dream state. Also, your energy will be higher and your dreams will be clearer.

Teaching
You usually have one important teaching dream a night. This gives you information on problems you are facing, or shows you higher teachings from advanced levels. You are prepared for what is going to happen during the next 24 hours. Often a dejâ vu experience is remembering what the superconscious mind stored in the subconscious memory back during the dream state. You already knew you were going to say something in a certain way, or that a particular person was going to do or say something. Most dreams are concerned with what you are presently going through and how best to deal with situations and relationships.

You may find yourself sitting in a classroom, giving or hearing a lecture, or walking with a teacher in some beautiful surroundings. You may be hearing information you never knew before and have good recall of it upon awakening. Many discoveries and inspirations have come from higher levels of these teaching dreams.

Problem solving
These are dreams you have programmed or asked for. You may be seeking insight on understanding a difficult relationship, solving a scientific mystery, or asking for the plot of a new novel. All knowledge and information are available to you when you learn how to tap it. Learning how to program dreams and understand their messages is one of your most valuable inner resources.

Precognitive
This dream gives you a glimpse of something in the future. It is different from the cieja vu experience, because precognition is usually concerning someone other than yourself. Precognition means foreknowing. There is a special sense or feeling to the precognitive dream. As you learn to recognize it, you will know which images are symbolic and which may happen to be literal precognitive events. It is a psychic level phenomenon.

Most precognitive dreams are given to awaken people to expanded dimensions of the mind. Often non-meditators will have them, for then they are forced to ask how they know such and such about a particular person. The mind, of course, is not bound by time. Hopefully these dreams direct your attention inward so that you become more interested in developing and learning about the inner self.

Prophetic or visionary
This dream comes from the highest level of the soul. It is a message from God or the God-self and concerns spiritual growth. It comes from the mystical level of awareness. It may have a personal message or may contain a universal truth. The vision is on a much larger scale than you commonly associate with dreaming. It has a totally different quality of awareness about it. You know you are awake, aware, yet also realize you are in the dream state. Prophesies of old and mystical teachings have come through the visionary level of consciousness. A vision has many qualities within it: insight, understanding, expansion, realization of the oneness of all life, power and love. I may have only one vision a year, but it is always worth waiting for.

Outside Interference
This dream is produced when something in your physical environment is causing enough disruption to get incorporated in your dream story. For example, you dream you are very hot and awaken to find too many covers piled on top of you. Ringing phones, barking dogs, cold feet on your back—anything can be a part of the dream, with no real message from the superconscious or higher self.

Also, if you fall asleep watching television or listening to the radio, any or all of that information can affect your dreams. It is always best to sleep in a quiet, restful environment. There is enough blaring into the subconscious throughout the day without adding more to it during your sleep time.

Indigestion or a full bladder also affects dream images. Just be aware when interpreting dreams that you may be picking up such outside interferences.

Anatomy of a Dream
Dreams often present themselves in three steps. First they give the time reference for the problem, situation or program you are running. For example, if you are shown a house you lived in when you were a child, the house represents an old program or awareness of self that started way back then.

Second, they will show you how the problem is manifesting itself now in your life and present awareness—what is surrounding it.

Third, they will present the solution to the situation, or how to learn from and move beyond the program or problem that is limiting you.

Most teaching dreams will follow this format. If you remember seeing a car, house, school or person of your past, that is usually part of the first phase of the dream.

Understanding Dream Symbols
The most curious thing about dreams, perhaps, is they speak to us in symbols. These may seem strange, but once we understand the meaning they are much clearer than our usual way of attempting to communicate with ourselves and others.

Why, you may ask, do I have to go through all the symbology in dreams? Wouldn’t it be easier just to get the straight message? Communication among people is difficult at best. So many things are open to misinterpretation because of blocks and perceptual filters.

My guidance has said that dreams are given symbolically because once you know your own symbols you cannot mistake the message. You will know instantly what is being given to you and you will understand it totally. Actually symbols are like shorthand and are much easier to interpret than verbal conversation.

Working with dream symbols might be compared to playing the piano. When you first begin you are certain that this has to be the most awkward and complicated thing you have ever undertaken. But after a routine of regular practice, your new skill becomes a natural, flowing easy part of your life. Or, take the computer industry. If you do not understand computer language, it all seems foreign and difficult. If you hear someone speaking a language different from your own, it is the old ‘it’s all Greek to me” feeling. If you speak, read and write Greek, however, it is another story.

So think of working with dream symbols as just learning another language. They are a higher, more accurate, more integrative level, that enables you to become aware of self as an interdimensional being.

The Starting Point
There are primary dream symbols which usually have the same meanings. A good place to begin is to realize that everything in the dream is you. You are the producer, writer, actor and director. People in the dream usually represent qualities within yourself you have projected on to them. Male and female figures represent your own masculine and feminine energies. A child represents your child part, an aged person an old part of self, either one that is wise or a part that is dying because you have outgrown it. Animals represent feelings you have about specific animals or the characteristics associated with them; for example, a wolf is danger, like the wolf in sheep’s clothing; a fox is cunning and craftiness.

A house, building, store or other structure is you. If it is large, it indicates great potential and awareness of opportunities and/or inner resources. If the rooms are cluttered, you obviously are not keeping your house in order. If some of the rooms are dark, they are parts of the self you do not know or understand. The attic or upstairs represents the spiritual self, the ground floor the physical or everyday self, and the basement the sexual or subconscious self. The various rooms and how they are decorated and arranged indicate that particular aspect of your life; bathroom—cleansing, eliminating, releasing; dining room—nurturing, fellowship, and so on.

Any vehicle—a car, plane, spacecraft, boat—also represents the self. It is your mode of traveling or being in the world. A car is your physical vehicle and indicates how you are traveling in everyday life. Going backwards, downhill, the wrong way? Got a flat tire? Are you speeding ahead in perfect control? A boat or ship is your emotional vehicle and lets you know what is going on in your emotional life. Are you being tossed upon the seas of life, going up and down? Are you in dry dock? Are you at the helm? Do you have an anchor?

An airplane or any airborne vessel is your spiritual vehicle, and if you are on your way to the airport, you know you are preparing to take off to new spiritual understanding.

A motorcycle or bicycle means you need balance in your life.

Water represents the emotions, fire is purification, air is the spiritual self and earth is the physical self (or degree of grounding).

Once you begin to recognize a few basic symbols, then you begin to look for colors (you do not dream in black and white), clothes, people, scenery, objects, sizes, shapes, numbers, words, letters and so on. Everything has its own significance. Fences or road blocks indicate that creative thinking is needed to get beyond a particular problem that is now facing you. The kind of road on which you find yourself traveling represents how smooth or rough your journey is at present. If you are on a freeway it is easy going. If a bumpy road you are getting there but it is a little rough at present. If you are paving a road you are making your way easier for the future.

Any symbols given to you—whether in fantasy, meditation or guided imagery—are all the same. They are coded messages from self to self. When you “get the picture,” you understand the situation.

You Are The Final Word
Remember that you are always your own best interpreter. You are the final word on the meaning of a symbol for you.

Do not be so gullible that you eagerly accept another’s interpretation. This is giving away power and neglecting the refinement and trust of your own inner resources. If the symbol in the dream dictionary does not feel right, look it up in an unabridged dictionary. Often meanings are there you have never considered before, and a little bell will ring in your head when you read one of them. The definitions offered in this book are generalized and if they do not apply to a specific situation, you need to keep looking, reflecting, and meditating upon a symbol until it reveals its true meaning to you. And by working them out, they become so simple that you know you are always being guided by your own higher self or the God within you.

Common Types of Dreams
Nothing is off limits in the dream state. We are open to experiencing all levels of self, all fears, frustrations, suppressed images, unknown territory, visionary insights. We will become more comfortable with all dream images when we learn to welcome them, whatever they are, as symbolic messengers of self.

There is no such thing as a bad dream symbol. The most grotesque or frightening dreams have the most positive insights once they are worked out. Remember, dream images are just trying to get your attention, so do not resist them. Seek to recognize the insight so you can move on to more joyous awareness. Many people have the following common types of dreams:

Nightmares
A dream known to most all of us is the nightmare. It is one of our most valuable teaching dreams because it shows us a fear that has been blown way out of proportion or something we have suppressed that is affecting us negatively. Often we do not remember the happy dreams. But the frightening ones will make more of an impression and we will be more inclined to work them out.

For example, a man had a recurring nightmare that a large rat was eating away at his neck. He would awaken screaming and clawing at his neck to remove the rat. Upon analysis, he discovered that the neck represented the throat chakra. He was not verbalizing his needs, and the suppression was gnawing away and resulting in self-destructive behaviors. The rat was an insecure part of self that was betraying him. We must always nurture the inner self, taking care to verbalize and express what it is that we want and need. After he began to take assertive steps to resolve these problems both at work and in his personal relationships, the rat dream no longer continued.

Disaster Dreams
Whether earthquakes, flood, fire or tidal wave, a disaster indicates a sudden change in some area of your life. A flood means an emotional upheaval and an earthquake means a big rearrangement in your affairs. They usually indicate turning points or opportunities to take advantage of a new direction. See specific disasters in Part II.

Sexual Dreams
Sex is a big part of many dreams, and usually has little to do with the literal meaning of intercourse. Usually it indicates learning to balance the male and female polarities of our being. Remember that each one of us is both male and female, manifesting itself in a particular body.

To have sexual intercourse in a dream represents a merger of energies. If having intercourse with a man, it is a merger of masculine energies within the self; with a woman it is a merger of feminine energies. If you are a female (or male) and dream of making love with another female (or male) you actually know, it represents taking within the self qualities you associate with the particular individual. Making love with a member of the same sex usually has nothing to do with homosexuality.

Also, having intercourse in a dream with members of your family does not indicate a desire for incest. If making love with your father or mother, it represents a merger of wiser, nurturing qualities of the masculine or feminine self; with a son or daughter, an integration of the more childlike or youthful qualities of self. Remember all persons in the dream are an aspect of you.

A sexual dream accompanied by an orgasm may indicate a need to release and balance physical energy, and this is a way the body has of restoring equilibrium. We must remember that we are physical, sexual beings and this part of the self needs to be honored.

Costume Dreams
If you find yourself in a costume, it usually represents a past life. It may be that a problem you are facing now was the same one you were dealing with in another time and place. Remembering and understanding the dynamics of the costume dream will help you gain a perspective on whatever is presently confronting you.

Direction Dreams
The direction in which you are traveling indicates whether you are on the right track. If you are going up in a dream—up a mountain, up a road, ladder, staircase, elevator, whatever, you are going in the right direction. If you are going down, it is the wrong way. If you are going both up and down, your energy is scattered and you need to get centered. Going around in circles speaks for itself. If you are going to the right, you are following the path of intuition and guidance. To the left is the intellect and reason.

One man asked if he should participate in a conference and got a dream showing him riding on a down escalator, so steep that he had to heave his briefcase in front of him in order to hold on. Wrong direction, not in support of his study and projects at hand. Another example: a woman was considering the purchase of a certain automobile. She was shown the car sitting down at the bottom of a hill, and she had to walk down crowded streets to get there. She did not buy the car, and a much better offer came up within a few days.

Flying
Flying dreams are great fun, and usually mean you are consciously out of the body. If you can gain control of a flying dream you are free to go anywhere you like. You may think yourself in different places in time/space and instantly be there, or you may transcend dimensions. If you are flying around and then start losing altitude or think you are going to crash, it simply suggests that you have a fear of exploring higher dimensions and breaking out of limits. Try again the next night.

Falling
If you dream you are falling, you are probably having a bad landing coming back into the body. We all leave the body at night. If you jerk as you are dozing off, it is a bad exit. If you wake up and cannot move or talk, it means you are half in and half out of the body. We cannot move until we are totally in. Think yourself down to your feet. This will ground you.

We leave the body at night, or transcend physical awareness, to be taught and trained. The physical or third dimension is illusion; the dream state is reality. Through meditation and working with dreams you will never fear death as you will experience the fourth dimension and be as comfortable there as you are in the third dimension here.

Obscene Dreams
Nothing in a dream is obscene once you understand the meaning. Nothing is meant to insult you or offend you, but to get you to look at a level of self or limitation that you have avoided. Work it out and usually you will find a great deal of humor behind it.

Recurring Dreams
Like a movie rerun, there is a message you are not seeing. Recurring nightmares mean that you have not dealt with a particular fear. Recurring fence or barricade dreams mean there is a limit you imposed upon yourself that you have not yet recognized and removed. These are most important to write down and work out. Once you get the message they will stop.

Snake Dreams
Snakes frequently appear in dreams, and are power symbols. They represent the kundalini energy, or life force. One woman dreamed that a snake entered her lower body and moved up through the body trunk to the throat. The snake stuck in her throat, and she started choking. She awakened horrified. At first glance this does seem a bit unnerving, but actually it was a perfect explanation of what was happening in her life. The kundalini power is housed at the base of the spine. So the snake enters her body and begins to move upward. As we awaken energy it moves up through the various chakras. Her energy was flowing well until it reached the throat center, and there it stopped, causing choking. She was blocking energy in that center, and not verbalizing her needs and feelings. She was choking off communication because of fear and a poor self-image. This dream explained that her inner power was alive and well, and through releasing the blocks in the throat center by verbalizing and not suppressing she would get past present limitations in relationships with others.

Money Dreams
When you dream of coins or dollar bills, it represents changes coming into your life. Small coins, small change. Lots of bills, big changes.

Toilet Dreams
These dreams concern how well we are taking care of our inner garbage. Are we letting go of unneeded thoughts and experiences? Are we releasing the past so that we are able to live fully in the present? Difficulty in elimination or constipation indicates suppression. Diarrhea suggests forced elimination whether ready or not, and we are out of control in the process. A stopped up toilet means you are not releasing, flushing out negativity and wastes.

I had a dream with three stopped up toilets sitting out in the open. This was letting me know that I had to clean up my act mentally, physically and emotionally. I was now aware of things to do, priorities to establish, because the toilets were totally exposed for all to see.

Blood and Guts Dreams
Blood in a dream means loss of energy. If you are being stabbed, note the area of the body and check the corresponding chakra to see how you are losing energy. If you are being murdered or are murdering someone else, you are killing off a part of the self. This may be an aspect no longer needed, or a part that you are failing to nurture that is still valuable to self-growth.

Death Dreams:
A death means the ending of the old and making way for the new. A death seldom means a literal death. Rather it suggests the dying of a part of self necessary in the process of growth and regeneration. It may also mean you are dead inside and need to awaken feelings and sensitivity. So check carefully the symbols in the dream to get the message.

Chase Dreams. If you are being chased, or trying to run away from something, you are avoiding looking at a problem. If you cannot get your legs to move or are moving in slow motion, you will soon have to confront the fear you have been avoiding. When you are being chased, you are putting yourself through unnecessary anguish and pain. Remember to turn around and confront whatever aspect of self is chasing you, make peace with it, and the drama will end.... Dreampedia

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Dreampedia

Big

Power or strength.

Protectiveness.

A feeling of overwhelm or of things being out of control.

For more clues, consider what the big object or person represents.

The big size may represent “a greater amount” or “an extreme” of whatever the object or person represents.

For example, if a flower represents love, a huge flower might represent huge feelings of love or adoration.

If a car represents personal power, an oversized car might represent an enhanced feeling of personal power.

See also: Bigger, Getting; Size; High; Heavy; Measure; Fat; Infinite; Many... The Curious Dreamer’s Dream Dictionary

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The Curious Dreamer’s Dream Dictionary

Enough

Having enough or a satisfactory amount of something can represent: Feeling satisfied in real life.

Wishing you had more of something (tangible or intangible).

See also: Extra; Many; Big; Infinite; Rich; Scarcity... The Curious Dreamer’s Dream Dictionary

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The Curious Dreamer’s Dream Dictionary