Meaning of Indians Dreams | Dream Interpretation

Dream interpretations were found from 1 different sources.


North American, South American, or Mexican Indians in a dream  may be considered as good omens if they were friendly, but if they seemed hostile, the dream is a warning of treachery among your associates, can discover the source.

The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams | Stearn Robinson - Tom Corbett


Indians | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Indians

0 dream symbols found for this dream.

Deer

As like with most other animals, the deer in your dream may represent some aspect of your intuition or it may be a message from your unconscious. In some parts of Asia, deer are considered to be conductors of soul and thus the robes of shamans are usually made out of deerskin.

The Indians of North and South America also gave deer a spiritually important role. They believed that the souls of men passed into deer at the time of death. They also believed that a dying deer was a negative omen, which usually represented droughts that in turn foretold of very difficult times ahead. In the modern world, we generally see deer as gentle forest animals. Deer are characters in children’s stories and Santa Clause uses them to bring gifts to all. Thus, the deer in your dream may be a symbol of gentle and helpful parts of your psyche. In order to understand the message of the dream, think about what situation in your life would benefit from gentleness and soul fullness?... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

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The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Black Cat

To dream of any black animal is unfortunate, for these are associated with evil spirits (Artemidorus); the Chinese attach cspecial misfortune to the symbol of the black cat. American Indians hold it as a symbol of good luck.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

Creativity And Problem Solving In Dreams

Few dreams are, by themselves, problem solving or creative.

The few excep­tions are usually very clear. Example: ‘My mother-in-law died of cancer. I had watched the whole progression of her illness, and was very upset by her death. Shortly after she died the relatives gathered and began to sort through her belongings to share them out. That was the climax of my upset and distress, and I didn’t want any part of this sorting and taking her things. That night I dreamt I was in a room with all the relatives. They were sorting her things, and I felt my waking distress. Then my mother-in-law came into the room. She was very real and seemed happy. She said for me not to be upset as she didn’t at all mind her relatives taking her things. When I woke from the dream all the anxiety and upset had disap­peared. It never returned (told to author dunng a talk given to the Housewives Register in Ilfracombe).

Although in any collection of dreams such clearcut prob­lem solving is fairly rare, nevertheless the basic function in dreams appears to be problem solving.

The proof of this lies in research done in dream withdrawal. As explained in the entry science, sleep and dreams, subjects are woken up as they begin to dream, therefore denying them dreams. This quickly leads to disorientation and breakdown of normal functioning, showing that a lot of problem solving occurs in dreams, even though it may not be as obvious as in the exam­ple. This feature of dreaming can be enhanced to a marked degree by processing dreams and arriving at insights into the information they contain. This enables old problems to be cleared up and new information and attitudes to be brought into use more quickly. Through such active work one be­comes aware of the self, which Carl Jung describes as a cen­tre, but which we might think of as a synthesis of all our experience and being. Gaining insight and allowing the self entrance into our waking affairs, as M L. Von Franz says in Man and His Symbols, gradually produces a wider and more mature personality’ which emerges, and by degrees becomes effective and even visible to others’.

The function of dreams may well be described as an effort on the part of our life process to support, augment and help mature waking consciousness.

A study of dreams suggests that the creative forces which are behind the growth of our body are also inextricably connected with psychological develop­ment. In fact, when the process of physical growth stops, the psychological growth continues.

If this is thwarted in any way, it leads to frustration, physical tension and psychosomatic and eventually physical illness.

The integration of experience.

which dreams are always attempting, if successful cannot help but lead to personal growth. But it is often frozen by the individual avoiding the growing pains’, or the discomfon of breaking through old concepts and beliefs.

Where there is any attempt on the pan of our conscious personality to co-operate with this, the creative aspect of dreaming emerges. In fact anything we are deeply involved in, challenged by or attempting, we will dream about in a creative way. Not only have communities like the American Indians used dreams in this manner—to find better hunting, solve community problems, find a sense of personal life direction— but scientists, writers, designers and thousands of lay people have found very real information in dreams After all, through dreams we have personal use of the greatest computer ever produced in the history of the world—the human brain.

1- In Genesis 41, the story of Pharaoh’s dream is told—the seven fat cows and the seven thin cows. This dream was creative in that, with Joseph’s interpretation, it resolved a national problem where famine followed years of plenty. It may very well be an example of gathered information on the history of Egypt being in the mind of Pharaoh, and the dream putting it together in a problem solving way. See dream process as computer.

2- William Blake dreamt his dead brother showed him a new way of engraving copper. Blake used the method success­fully.

3- Otto Leowi dreamt of how to prove that nervous impulses were chemical rather than electncal. This led to his Nobel prize.

4- Friedrich Kekule tned for years to define the structure of benzene. He dreamt of a snake with its tail in its mouth, and woke to realise this explained the molecular forma­tion of the benzene ring. He was so impressed he urged colleagues, ‘Gentlemen, leam to dream.’

5- Hilprecht had an amazing dream of the connection be­tween two pieces of agate which enabled him to translate an ancient Babylonian inscription.

6- Elias Howe faced the problem of how to produce an effec­tive sewing machine.

The major difficulty was the needle. He dreamt of natives shaking spears with holes in their points. This led to the invention of the Singer sewing ma­chine.

7- Robert Louis Stevenson claims to have dreamt the plot of many of his stories.

8- Albert Einstein said that during adolescence he dreamt he was riding a sledge. It went faster and faster until it reached the speed of light.

The stars began to change into amazing patterns and colours, dazzling and beautiful. His meditation on that dream throughout the years led to the theory of relativity.

To approach our dreams in order to discover their creativity, first decide what problematic or creative aspect of your life needs ‘dream power’. Define what you have already leamt or know about the problem. Write it down, and from this clarify what it is you want more insight into.

If this breaks down into several issues, choose one at a time. Think about the issue and pursue it as much as you can while awake. Read about it, ask people’s opinions, gather information. This is all data for the dream process.

If the question still needs further insight, be­fore going to sleep imagine you are putting the question to your internal store of wisdom, computer, power centre, or whatever image feels right.

For some people an old being who is neither exclusively man nor woman is a working image.

In the morning note down whatever dream you remember. It does not matter if the dream does not appear to deal with the question; Elias Howe’s native spears were an outlandish image, but nevertheless contained the information he needed. Investigate the dream using the techniques given in the entry dream processing. Some problems take time to define, so use the process until there is a resolution.

If it is a major problem, it may take a year or so; after all, some resolutions need re­structuring of the personality, because the problem cannot disappear while we still have the same attitudes and fears. See secret of the universe dreams; dream processing. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Analysis

Sigmund Freud was the founder of modern therapeutic analysis of dreams. Freud encouraged clients to relax on a couch and allow free associations to arise in con­nection with aspects of their dream. In this way he helped the person move from the surface images (manifest content) of the dream to the underlying emotions, fantasies and wishes (latent content), often connected with early childhood. Be­cause dreams use condensation—a mass of different ideas or experiences all represented by one dream image or event— Freud stated that the manifest content was meagre’ compared with the ‘richness and variety’ of latent content.

If one suc­ceeds in touching the feelings and memories usually con­nected with a dream image, this becomes apparent because of the depth of insight and experience which arises. Although ideally the Freudian analyst helps the client discover their own experience of their dream, it can occur that the analyst puts to the client readymade views of the dream. Out of this has occurred the idea of someone else ‘analysing or telling us about our dream.

Carl Jung used a different approach. He applied amplifica­tion (see entry), helped the client explore their associations, used active imagination (see entry) and stuck to the structure of the dream. Because amplification also put to the client the information and experience of the therapist, again the dreamwork can be largely verbal and intellectual, rather than experiential.

In the approach of Fritz Perls (gestalt therapy) and Moreno (psychodrama), dream analysis is almost entirely experiential.

The person exploring the dream acts out or verbalises each role or aspect of the dream.

If one dreamt of a house, in gestalt one might stan by saying I am a house’ and then go on to describe oneself just as one is as the particular house in the dream.

It is important, even if the house were one existing externally, not to attempt a description of the external house, but to stay with the house as it was in the dream. This is like amplification, except the client gives all the information. This can be a very dramatic and emotional experience because we begin consciously to touch the immense realms of experience usually hidden behind the image. When successful this leads to personal insights into behaviour and creativity. See dream processing; amplification; gestalt dream work.

dream as a meeting place Any two people, or group of people who share their dreams, particularly if they explore the associated feelings and thoughts connected with the dream images, achieve social intimacy quickly. Whether it is a family sharing their dreams, or two fnends, an environment can be created in which the most profound feelings, painful and wonderful, can be allowed. Such exposure of the usually pri­vate areas of one s feelings and fears often presents new infor­mation to the dreamer, and also allows ventilation of what may never have been consciously expressed before. In doing so a healing release is reached, but also greater self under­standing and the opportunity to think over or reconsider what is discovered.

Herbert Reed, editor of the dream magazine Sundance, and resident in Virginia Beach, Va., initiated group dreaming ex­periments. It started because Reed noticed that in the dream groups he was running, when one of the group aired a prob­lem, other members would subsequently dream about that person’s problem. He went on to suggest the group should attempt this purposely and the resulting dreams shared to see if they helped the person with the problem.

The reported dreams often formed a more detailed view of the person’s situation. In one instance the group experienced many dream images of water. It aided the woman who was seeking help to admit she had a phobia of water and to begin thinking about learning to swim. In another experiment, a woman presented the problem of indecision about what college to transfer to and what to study. Her group subsequently said they were confused because they had not dreamt about school. Several had dreams about illicit sex. though, which led the woman to admit she was having an affair with a married man. She went on to realise that it was the affair which was underlying her indecision. She chose to end the affair and further her career.

Whatever may be underlying the results of Reed’s expen- ments, it is noticeably helpful to use the basic principles he is working with. They can be used by two people equally as well as a group—by a parent and child, wife and husband, busi­nessman and employee. One sets out to dream about each other through mutual agreement. Like any undertaking, the involvement, and therefore the results, are much more pro­nounced if there is an issue of reasonable importance behind the experiment. It helps if one imagines that during sleep you are going to meet each other to consider what is happening between you. Then sleep, and on waking take time to recall any dream. Note it down, even if it seems far removed from what you expected. Then explore its content using the tech­niques in dream processing.

Example: My wife and I decided to attempt to meet in our dreams. I dreamt I was in a room similar to the back bedroom of my previous marnage. My present wife was with me. She asked me to help her move the wardrobe. It reminded me of, but did not look like, the one which had been in that bed­room. I stood with my back to it, and reached my hands up to press on the top, inside. In this way I carried it to another wall. As I put it down the wood broke. I felt it ought to be thrown away’ (Thomas B). Thomas explored the dream and found he connected feelings about his first marriage with the wardrobe and bedroom. In fact the shabby wardrobe was Tom’s feelings of shabbiness at having divorced his first wife. In his first marriage, represented by the bedroom, he always felt he was married for life. In divorcing, he had done some­thing he didn’t like and was carrying it about with him. He says ‘1 am carrying this feeling of shabbiness and second best into my present relationship, and I need to get rid of it.’

dream as a spiritual guide Dreams have always been con­nected with the spiritual side of human experience, even though today many spiritual leaders disagree with consider­ation of dreams. Because dreams put the dreamer in touch with the source of their own internal wisdom and certainty, some conflict has existed between authoritative priesthood and public dreaming.

A lay person finding their own ap­proach to God in a dream might question the authority of the priests. No doubt people frequently made up dreams about God in order to be listened to. Nevertheless, despite opposi­tion, Matthew still dreamt of an angel appearing to him, Jo­seph was still warned by God to move Jesus; Peter still dreamt his dream of the unclean animals.

The modern scientific approach has placed large question marks against the concept of the human spirit. Study of the brain’s functions and biochemical activities have led to a sense of human personality being wholly a series of biological and biochemical events.

The results of this in the relationship between doctor and patient, psychiatrist and client, some­times results in the communication of human personality be­ing of little consequence. It may not be put into words, but the intimation is that if one is depressed it is a biochemical prob­lem or a brain malfunction.

If one is withdrawn or autistic, it is not that there is a vital centre of personality which has for some reason chosen to avoid contact, but that a biochemical or physiological problem is the cause—it’s nothing personal, take this pill (to change the biochemistry, because you are not really a person). Of course we have to accept that human personality must sometimes face the tragedy of biochemical malfunction, but we also need to accept that biochemical and physiological process can be changed by human will and courage.

In attempting to find what the human spirit is by looking at dreams, creativity stands out.

The spiritual nature may not be what we have traditionally considered it to be.

An overview of dreams and how dreamers relate to them suggests one amaz­ing fact. Let us call it the ‘seashell effect’. When we hear sounds in a shell that we hold to our ear, the noises heard seem exterior to oneself, yet they are most likely amplification of sounds created in our own ear, perhaps by the passage of blood. Imagine an electronic arcade machine which the player could sit in and, when running, the player could be engulfed in images, sounds, smell and sensation. At first there is shim­mering darkness, then a sound, and lights move. Is it a face seen, or a creature. Like Rorschach’s ink blots, the person creates figures and scenes out of the shapeless light and sound.

A devil appears which terrifies the player. People, de­mons, animals, God and angels appear and fade. Scenes are clearcut or a maelstrom of movement and ill-defined activity. Events arise showing every and any aspect of human experi­ence. Nothing is impossible.

If, on stepping out, we told the player that what occurred was all their own creation due to unconscious feelings, fears, habits, thoughts and physiological processes occurring within them, like the seashell effect, they might say ‘Good God, is that all it was, and I thought it was real. What a waste of time.’

Whether we can accept it or not, as a species we have created out of our own longings, fears, pain and perhaps vi­sion, God, with many different names—politics, money, dev­ils, nationalism, angels, an, and so on and on. All of it has flowed out of us. Perhaps we even deny we are the authors of the Bible, wars, social environments. Responsibility is diffi­cult.

It is easier to believe the source is outside oneself. And if we do take responsibility for our amazing creativity, we may feel ‘is that all it is—me?’ Yet out of such things, such fears, such drives, such unconscious patterns as we shape our dreams with, we shape our life and fonune, we shape our children, we shape the world and our future.

The shadow of fear we create in our dream, the situation of aloneness and anger, becomes a pattern of feelings, real in its world of mind. We create a monster, a Djinn, a devil, which then haunts and influences us. Or with feelings of hope, of purposiveness and love, create other forces in us and the world. But we are the creator. We are in no way separate from the forces which create our existence. We are those creative forces. In the deep­est sense, not just as an ego, we create ourselves, and we go on creating ourselves. We are the God humanity has looked so long for.

The second aspect of the human spirit demonstrated by dreams is consciousness.

The unconscious mind, if its func­tion is not clogged with a backlog of undealt with painful childhood experience and nonfunctional premises, has a pro­pensity to form gestalts. It takes pieces of experience and fits them together to form a whole. This is illustrated by how we form gestalts when viewing newsprint photographs, which are made up of many small dots. Our mind fits them together and sees them as a whole, giving meaning where there are only dots. When the human mind is working well, when the indi­vidual can face a wide range of emotions, from fear and pain to ecstasy, this process of forming gestalts can operate very creatively. This is because it needs conscious involvement, and if the personality is frightened of deep feeling, the uniting of deeply infantile and often disturbing cxpcrience is cut out. Yet these areas are very rich mines of information, containing our most fundamental learning.

If the process is working well, then one’s expenence is gradually transformed into insights which transcend and thereby transform one s personal life.

For instance, we have witnessed our own binh in some manner, we also see many others appeanng as babies. We see people ageing, dying. We see millions of events in our life and in others.

The uncon­scious, deeply versed in imagery, ritual and body language, out of which it creates its dreams, picks up information from music, architecture, traditional rituals, people walking in the street, the unspoken world of parental influence.

The sources are massive, unbelievable. And out of it all our mind creates meaning. Like a process of placing face over face over face until a composite face is formed, a synthesis of all the faces; so the unconscious scans all this information and creates a world view, a concept of life and death.

The archetypes Jung talks of are perhaps the resulting synthesis of our own expenence, reaching points others have met also.

If so, then Chnst might be our impression of humanity as a whole.

If we dare to touch such a synthesis of experience it may be seanng, breathtaking.

It breaks the boundaries of our present personality and con­cepts because it transcends. It shatters us to let the new vision emerge. It reaches, it soars, like an eagle flying above the single events of life. Perhaps because of this the great hawk of ancient Egypt represented the human spirit.

Lastly, humans have always been faced by the impossible.

To a baby, walking and not wetting its pants is impossible, but with many a fall and accident it does the impossible.

It is a god in its achievement.

To talk, to fly heavier-than-air planes, to walk on the Moon, were all impossible. Humans challenge the impossible every day. Over and over they fall, back into defeat. Many lie there broken. Yet with the next moment along come youngsters with no more sense than grasshoppers, and because they don’t know what the differ­ence is between right and left, do the impossible. Out of the infinite potential, the great unknown, they draw something new. With hope, with folly, with a wisdom they gain from who knows where, they demand more. And it’s a common everyday son of miracle. Mothers do it constantly for their children—transcending themselves. Lovers go through hell and heaven for each other and flower beyond who they were. You and I grow old on it as our daily bread, yet fail to see how holy it is. And if we turn away from it, it is because it offers no certainties, gives no authority, claims no reward.

It is the spir­itual life of people on the street. And our dreams remember, even if we fail.

For this is the body and blood of the human spirit.

dream as a therapist and healer There is a long tradition of using dreams as a base for both physical and psychological healing. One of the earliest recorded incidents of such healing is when Pharaoh’s ‘spirit was troubled, and he sent for all the magicians of Egypt and all its wise men; and Pharaoh told them his dream, but there was none who could interpret it’. Then Joseph revealed the meaning of the dream and so the healing of Pharaoh’s troubled mind took place (Genesis 41).

The Greek Temples of Asclepius were devoted to using dreams as a base for healing of body and mind (see dreams and ancient Greece).

The Iroquois Amerindians used a social form of dream therapy also (see Iroquoian dream cult).

The dream process was used much more widely throughout his­tory in such practices as Pentecostal Christianity, shaktipat yoga in India, and Anton Mesmer’s groups (see sleep move­ments).

Sigmund Freud pioneered the modern approach to the use of dreams in therapy, but many different approaches have developed since his work. Examples of the therapeutic action of gaining insight into dreams are to be found in the entnes on abreaction, recurring dreams, reptiles.

The entry on dream processing gives information about using a dream to gain insight and healing. See also dream as meeting place.

A feature which people who use their dreams as a thera­peutic tool mention again and again is how dreams empower them. Many of us have an unconscious feeling that any impor­tant healing work regarding our body and mind can only be undertaken and directed by an expert, the expert might be a doctor, a psychiatrist, psychotherapist, or osteopath. Witness­ing the result of their own dream process, even if helped by an expert, people feel in touch with a wonderful internal process which is working actively for their own good. One woman, who had worked on her dream with the help of a fnend (non expert), said It gave me great confidence in my own internal process. I realised there was something powerful in myself working for my own good. It was a feeling of cooperating with life.’ One is frequently amazed by one’s own resources of wisdom, penetrating insight and sense of connection with life, as met in dreamwork. This is how dreams play a pan in helping one towards wholeness and balance.

The growing awareness of one’s central view of things, which is so wide, piercing and often humorous, brings developing self respect as the saga of one’s dreams unfolds.

There may be no hint of this, however, if a person simply records their dreams without attempting to find a deeply felt contact with their contents.

It is in the searching for associ­ated feelings and ideas that the work of integrating the many strands of one’s life begins. Gradually one weaves, through a co-operative action with the dream process, a greater unifica­tion of the dark and the light, the painful and transcendent in one’s nature.

The result is an extraordinary process of educa­tion. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Iroquoian

dream cult The Iroquois (Huron and Seneca) American Indians, as early as the 17th century (first European contact and study), had developed a deeper psychological un­derstanding than the white races of the time. They had no divinity but the dream—so wrote Father Fremin, who studied their customs. They clearly described the conscious and un­conscious, and said that through dreams the hidden or uncon­scious area of the psyche makes its desires known.

If it does not receive these desires it becomes angry.

The Iroquois there­fore developed a system of allowing the dreamer to act out their dreams socially. Although a moral and disciplined group, during such acting out the dreamer was allowed to go beyond usual social boundaries. This included receiving valu­able objects and making love to another person’s spouse. This was to allow unconscious desires to be expressed, thus avoid­ing sickness of body or mind. Such hidden desires were seen as the basis of social as well as individual problems. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Mandala

If one could produce a graphic image of the whole of human nature, many different forms might be integrated within an overall shape, perhaps a circle or square. Also, if it were possible to have a visual presentation of a person’s inner world of mind, weaknesses, strengths, order, confusion and quality, each person would appear differently. Some would be internally jumbled, divided and ugly, others symmetrical, inte­grated and beautiful.

Because the unconscious produces dreams, and because dreams are imagery which give form to the otherwise abstract elements of internal human nature, there anse in some dreams shapes or patterns which depict an overall view of one s own inner condition. Carl Jung drew attention to the circle and square designs in some dreams, calling them man- dalas, and seeing them as representing the nucleus of the human identity. Although we are, in our everyday life, the magical and mysterious process of life, it is difficult for us actually to answer the question ‘Who am I?’ or ‘What am I?’ with any lasting conviction.

The mysterious essence of ourself is met in dreams as a circular or square object or design, as the sun, a flower, a square garden with a round pond in the middle, or a circle with a square or quartered design within it, a circle with a cross within, a revolving or flying cross-shaped object. Classi­cal symbols from all nations use this theme; and we can find it in the round table of King Arthur, in the centre of which the Holy Grail appeared; the healing sand paintings of the Na- vaho Indians, the zodiac; circle dances; stone circles; the Bud­dhist wheel of birth and death; and so on.

The circle usually symbolises a natural wholeness, our in­ner life as nature has shaped it.

The square shows wholeness we have helped shape by conscious cooperation with our m- neT world. There are two main reasons why one produces this theme in one’s dreams. It occurs in children or people meet­ing internal or external shocks, and produces a strengthening of the vulnerable identity in meeting the vaned influences they face. It arises in people who are meeting and integrating the wider life of their being existing beyond the boundaries of their usual interests, or what they allow themselves to experi­ence.

The contact with the self is then pan of an extending of awareness into what was dark or unknown, not only in our own unconscious, but in external life. In touching the nucleus of one’s being in this way, one becomes aware in some mea­sure of the infinite potential of one’s life. There is often an accompanying sense of existence in eternity and the many different mansions’ or dimensions of experience one has within the eternal. See the self under archetypes; shapes. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Religion And Dreams

In most ancient cultures, consider­ation and even veneration of dreams played a great pan. Some groups felt that dream life was more real and imponant than waking life. Not only were dreams looked to for information about hunting (Eskimo groups), but also for ways of healing physical and psychological ills (Greek dream temples) and insights into the medicinal properties of herbs, barks and clays (African tribal witchdoctors). Common to most of these groups, and evident in the Old Testament, was also the sense that through dreams one had awareness of the transcendental or supersensible. St Peter’s dream of the sheet and unclean animals was a turning point in the history of western socicty —as was Constantine’s dream of his victory if he used the symbol of Christianity.

At its most fundamental, the human religious sense emerges out of several factors. One is the awareness of ex­isting amidst external and internal forces of nature which cause us to feel vulnerable and perhaps powerless. Such natu­ral processes as illness, death, growth and decay, earthquakes, the seasons, confront us with things which are often beyond our ability to control. Considenng the information and re­sources of the times, one of religion’s main functions in the past was the attempted control of the ‘uncertain’ factors in human life, and help towards psychological adjustment to vali­ne rability. Religions were the first social programmes aiding the human need for help and support towards emotional, mental, physical and social health and maturity. Even if prim­itive, such programmes helped groups of people to gain a common identity and live in reasonable harmony together. Like a computer program which is specific to a particular business, such programmes were specific to a particular group, and so are outdated in today’s need for greater integra­tion with other races. Religions also offered some sort of con­cept of and connection with the roots of being.

Example: ‘For two nights running I have dreamt the same nightmare. I am in a chapel walking down the first flight of several flights of steps when I hear loud noises behind me. I am told to run, being warned of the soldiers who ride the cavalry horses nght down the steps, and who run you over if you are in their way.

The horses are fierce and they absolutely race down the steps at the same time every day, and you literally have to lock yourself away in a nearby room which is a long way down the chapel. I ran into the room hearing the pounding of the horses’ hooves. It was a terrible pandemo­nium in that chapel. In the room were school children the same age as me and some perhaps younger’ (Maria H). Maria, who is 16, in describing her dream says she had recently been confronted with whether to have a sexual relationship with her boyfriend. Religion, represented by the chapel, is Maria’s way of locking out her powerful sexual urges. Many dreams show that religion, as a set of beliefs, is used as a way of avoiding anxiety in the face of life’s uncertainties.

For many people, the rigid belief system helps them to avoid uncertainty in making decisions.

Dreams also portray and define the aspect of human expe­rience in which we sense a kinship with all life forms. This is the side of spiritual expenence through which we find a con­nection with the roots of our being. While awake we might see the birth of a colt and feel the wonder of emergence and newness; the struggle to stand up and survive, the miracle of physical and sexual power which can be accepted or feared. In looking in the faces of fellow men and women we see something of what they have done in this strange and painful wonder we call life. We see whether they have been crushed by the forces confronting them; whether they have become ngid; or whether, through some common miracle, they have been able to carry into their mature years the laughter, the crying, the joy, the ability to feel pain, that are the very signs of life within the human soul. These things are sensed by us all, but seldom organised into a comprehensive view of life, and an extraction of meaning. Often it is only in our dreams, through the ability the unconscious has to draw out the signif­icance of such widely divergent expenences, that we glimpse the unity behind phenomena which is an essential of spiritual life, i.e. we all have a life, we breathe, we have come from a mother, so share a universal experience.

Example: To quote J.B. Priestley from his book Rain Upon Godshill: ‘Just before I went to Amenca, dunng the exhausting weeks when I was busy with my Time Plays, I had such a dream, and I think it left a greater impression on my mind than any experience I had ever known before, awake or in dreams, and said more to me about this life than any book I have ever read.

The setting of the dream was quite simple, and owed something to the fact that not long before my wife had visiied the lighthouse here at St Catherine’s to do some bird ringing. I dreamt I was standing at the top of a very high tower, alone, looking down upon myriads of birds all flying in one direction; every kind of bird was there, all the birds in the world. It was a noble sight, this vast aerial river of birds. But now in some mysterious fashion the gear was changed, and time speeded up, so that I saw generations of birds, watched them break their shells, flutter into life, mate, weaken, falter and die. Wings grew only to crumble; bodies were sleek, and then, in a flash bled and shrivelled; and death struck every­where at every second. What was the use of all this blind struggle towards life, this eager trying of wings, this hurried mating, this flight and surge, all this gigantic meaningless ef­fort? As I stared down, seeming to see every creature’s ignoble little history almost at a glance, I felt sick at heart. It would be better if not one of them, if not one of us, had been bom, if the struggle ceased for ever. I stood on my tower, still alone, desperately unhappy. But now the gear was changed again, and the time went faster still, and it was rushing by at such a rate, that the birds could not show any movement, but were like an enormous plain sown with feathers. But along this plain, flickering through the bodies themselves, there now passed a sort of white flame, trembling, dancing, then hurry­ing on; and as soon as I saw it I knew that this white flame was life itself, the very quintessence of being; and then it came to me, in a rocket burst of ecstasy, that nothing mattered, nothing could ever matter, because nothing else was real but this quivering and hurrying lambency of being. Birds, men and creatures not yet shaped and coloured, all were of no account except so far as this flame of life travelled through them. It left nothing to mourn over behind it, what I had thought was tragedy was mere emptiness or a shadow show; for now all real feeling was caught and purified and danced on ecstatically with the white flame of life. I had never before felt such deep happiness as I knew at the end of my dream of the tower and the birds.’

Some Nonh American Indians developed the totem out of similar processes. In one generation a person might learn to plant a seed and eat the results. Later someone might see that through fertilisation more food was produced. Still later some­one found that by irrigating, still more improvement was made. No one individual was responsible for such vital cul­tural information, and the collective information is bigger than any one person, yet individuals can partake of it and add to it.

The totem represented such subtle realities, as it might in a modem dream; as Christ might in today’s unconscious. That older cultures venerated their collective information, and that modem humans seem largely apathetic to it, shows how our ‘religion’ has degenerated. Yet utilising the power of the unconscious to portray the subtle influences which impinge upon us, and building the information gained into our re­sponse to life, is deeply important.

With the growth of authoritarian structures in western reli­gion, and the dominance of the rational mind over feeling values, dreams have been pushed into the background. With this change has developed the sense that visionary dreams were something which ‘superstitious* cultural groups had in the past. Yet thoroughly modem men and women still meet Christ powerfully in dreams and visions. Christ still appears to them as a living being.

The transcendental, the collective or universal enters their life just as frequently as ever before. Sometimes it enters with insistence and power, because a too rational mind has led to an unbalance in the psyche—a bal­ance in which the waking and rational individuality is one pole, and the feeling, connective awareness of the uncon­scious is the other.

Although it is tempting to think of the transcendent as ethereal or unreal, the religious in dreams is nearly always a symbol for the major processes of maturing in human life. We are the hero/ine who meets the dangers of life outside the womb, who faces growth, ageing and death.

The awe and deep emotions we unconsciously feel about such heroic deeds are depicted by religious emotion.

See angel; Christ, rebirth and Devil under archetypes; church; evil; fish, sea creatures; example in whale under fish, sea creatures; heaven, hell; sweets under food; dream as spiritual guide. See also hero/ine; mass; masturbation; old; paralysis; colours; sheep under animals. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Unconscious

As dreams apparently emerge from what has been named the unconscious, it is helpful to understand ideas regarding it, and something of its nature.

In ancient cultures we occasionally find hints regarding the unconscious, but not definite statements as were presented by Freud. In the dream theories worked out by the Iroquois American Indians, they believed that through dreams the hid­den or unconscious area of the psyche makes its desires known (see Iroquoian dream cult).

The Greek stories of the Underworld also clearly depict common unconscious activi­ties.

In general, however, many ancient peoples developed con­cepts of exterior agents such as devils, angels, spirits and God to account for phenomena which today we connect with the unconscious.

The first philosopher to talk clearly of an aspect of the mind being unconscious was Leibnitz. He observed that one often recalled at a later date some detail of experience which at the time one was unaware of. One must therefore have observed it unconsciously. So in general the word means anything we are not generally aware of in our being.

Freud’s concept of an unconscious element of human na­ture which influenced conscious behavior was strongly re­sisted. It was disturbing to many people and questioned the idea of humans being the ‘captain of their soul’.

The Freudian slip has become one of the popular examples of the influence of the unconscious. Saying to guests arriving at one’s house, Tm so sorry—I mean glad—you could come’ suggests one’s real feeling was sorrow at their arrival, not gladness. There is a story of a faculty member of Oxford University who asked the guests at a function to toast the queen, but his actual words were ‘Let us toast our queer dean.’ However such slips might be seen as attempts to conceal our real feelings, rather than evidence of unconscious motivations.

Taking into account not only Freudian and Jungian ap­proaches to the unconscious, but something of more recent research, the term unconscious must be taken to represent many functions and aspects of self, rather than something we can neatly define. Therefore, we might think of the term as being like the word ‘body’, which means a whole spectrum of organs, functions, chemical processes, neurological events, systems, cell activities, as well as one’s experience of these. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Tobacco

1- Tobacco appearing in dreams will have different meanings depending on whether the dreamer is a smoker or not.

If he or she is a smoker, then tobacco, in the dream, is probably a comfort tool.

If not, then the symbolism is probably more to do with the idea of using tobacco to achieve a particular state of mind.

If the dreamer is smoking a pipe, there may be issues of masculinity to deal with.

2- It is said that Red Indians use tobacco to drive away bad spirits, and it is true that initially tobacco will give the person a mood lift. In dreams it is this symbolism of change which is the meaningful one.

3- Tobacco as a giver of visions mav be the symbolism here. ‘The dreamer may be interested in the idea of spirituality, but as yet has not found the right stimulation.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Butterfly

(see Flying, bisects, Wings)

Personal growth, especially spiritual. In classical Greek and Roman philosophy, the butterfly’s transformation mirrored that of the ever evolving soul.

Esotericallv: Reincarnation, which may be literal or figurative.

If you see yourself emerging from the cocoon, this speaks of a new, beautiful beginning, and astounding positive changes.

The question of personal identity and uniqueness. In China, there is a story of the sage Hsuang Chou who dreamt of being a butterfly. During the dream, he had no awareness of Hsuang Chou, only the butterfly. WTien he awoke, this experience left him wondering. Was he really Hsuang Chou, or actually a butterfly dreaming of being Hsuang Chou?

In China, the butterflv also symbolizes a happy union, usually a marriage.

An excellent portent for any type of partnership, especially if the butterfly is formed out of jade (see Gems, Jewelry, Stones).

Missives from beyond: The Hopi Indians believe that butterflies carry the souls of the departed.

Swallowing a butterfly: In Ireland and ancient Greece, this signified pregnancy.

The ability to rebound and rejuvenate after a major setback.

If seen in its caterpillar form, it means you’re entering a stage of positive transformation.

If the creature is flying, you may soon receive news from friends afar.

For a young woman, this foretells happy love.... The Language of Dreams

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The Language of Dreams

Cows

(see Animals)

Red cows appearing in a dream are a positive, hopeful omen of peace and plenty. In Persia, these represented the spirit of dawn, which is filled with renewed vitality and courage.

In Greece, an all-white cow was ail alternative symbol for the moon.

A natural source of nourishment (see Meat).

Among the Celts and people of Scandinavian heritages, an emblem of continued provision.

A sacred animal in India, representative of life itself.

The milk from cows is used to nourish kings and priests, so this dream may represent self-nourishment.

Among ancient Egyptians, Indians, and Scandinavians, the cow was an emblem of the Great iMother, and some psychological schools still ascribe this image as possibly being linked to your own mother (see Women).... The Language of Dreams

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The Language of Dreams

Jade

(see Crystals, Gems, Jewelry, Stones)

Your station in life. In China, jade was used to indicate a person s rank,

Love and commitment.

The Chinese also felt jade was the perfect stone for lovers, ensuring their happiness (see Butterfly).

Among the Hopi Indians and Africans, Jade was fashioned into musical instruments, and as such becomes an emblem for harmony and creative use of what’s available.

Jade worn or carried in the dream represents increased mental faculties that also result in good business sense.

If you’ve been pondering a new venture, now’s the time to act.... The Language of Dreams

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The Language of Dreams

Parrot

(see Birds, Feathers, Wings)

Mirroring habits, characteristics, or ways that are not necessarily reflective of who you really are.

Repetition of cycles or patterns in your life, some of which may not be positive.

Among Pueblo Indians, an alternative emblem of the sun, which also embodies the power of color and light.

If the parrot is in the air, possibly a type of flying dream.

A “yes” person who accepts everything she / he is told to do or believe without real scrutiny.

Mockery or gossip.

In a cage, the parrot embodies the inability to integrate the lessons you see reflected through other people’s words and actions.... The Language of Dreams

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The Language of Dreams

Spider

(see Insects, Web) In men, this is frequently a maternal image (see Woman).

Ancient Grecian and Egyptian, and Native American: Fate and our ties to all times and all peoples. In Greece, Arachne spun the thread of peoples lives. Egyptians had Neith, who wove the world, and the Pueblo Indians have Spider Woman, who created the world from two strands of thread (see Web).

Feeling trapped in someone’s well-executed snare.

Creating connections that help you to finish a goal. Note that the line of networking here may not be direct, even as the spider’s web may take unexpected turns.... The Language of Dreams

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The Language of Dreams

Flute

A wind instrument often associated with Native American Indians, a flute may remark on a melodious spiritual experience.

A flute may appear to uplift the soul. As the instrument of the Pied Piper, it may warn that there is a seduction in the air that may lead you away from yourself.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

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Ariadne's Book of Dream

Jeep Cherokee

A Grand Cherokee is an off-road vehicle, which may point to the identity of someone who enjoys the great outdoors.

The Cherokee Indians, for whom this vehicle is named, may point to someone who is dnven by a heritage that is connected to nature, tribe, and community. Thus, pursuing a Grand Cherokee may refer to pursuing Native American spirituality as a path.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

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Ariadne's Book of Dream

Pontiac Grand Am

The Pontiac named after the Pontiac Indians of the Amencan plains may point to a fighting Native American spirit driving your intentions forward.

The Grand Am may suggest that you view every morning as a new beginning. Thus combined, it may state, “It’s a grand morning for going to battle for your beliefs.”... Ariadne's Book of Dream

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Ariadne's Book of Dream

Indian

Dreams of a Native American represent spirituality, connection to Great Spirit, a reverence for animals, the Earth and the Earth’s elements. Dreams of East Indians also represent spirituality, connection to Buddha and Krishna, the Dali Lama. See Aboriginal.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Duty

If some course of action presents itself in a dream as a duty, be careful how to react.

(1) It may be a true inner voice telling you what you must do in order to stay in tune - or to get in tune - with your ‘destiny’ (what Indians call ‘dharma\ a word which means both ‘destiny5 and ‘duty5).

(2) It may be a pontification from an over-developed super-ego, reflecting either irrational fears or guilt-feelings stemming from traumatic childhood experiences, or conventional notions of right and wrong instilled into you by parents or accepted from other people unconsciously or in an anxious effort to conform. In the former case there will invariably be something compulsive in your behaviour, something that will indicate that what is controlling your life is not reason but (unconscious) emotion. In the latter case consider: no one and nothing has any authority over you unless you give them it; you alone are responsible for your decisions and values; and your essential duty is to your inner self.... A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

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A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

Indian

Teacher, higher self or guidance. Depending upon context, if being chased by Indians or any people other than own race, represents part of self foreign to you; you are fearful of that which you do not understand.... The Dream Books Symbols

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The Dream Books Symbols

Healing

There is a long tradition of dreams being a resource for physical and psychological healing. The ancient Greek god Aesculapius was believed to come to people in their sleep to offer healing through their dreams. The sick and wounded would travel from far away places to sleep in the temple of Aesculapius to let the healer enter their dreams and heal them. The Greek philosopher Aristotle believed that premonitory dreams of sickness could be caused by the dreamer’s unconscious recognition of the symptoms. He postulated that dreams may be premonitions of an illness coming from within the body, where some ’unconscious’ mind recognized early symptoms that had not yet come to the attention of the ’waking self’. The Iroquois Amerindians used a social form of dream therapy and one of the earliest recorded instances of such healing is the famous story in the Old Testament, when Joseph revealed the meaning of dreams to Pharaoh.

Sigmund Freud pioneered the use of dreams in therapy, bringing them to widespread attention, but many other approaches have been developed since then. The common feature for people who use dreams as therapeutic tools for physical and emotional healing is that dreams can empower them; they feel in touch with a powerful inner process that they believe is working actively for their own good.

Since time immemorial, people have created special places in which to sleep and dream. The dreaming chamber on the island of Malta is one example, but ancient dream temples can be found all over the world. These places were meant to ’incubate’ wise, deep dreams that would bring guidance and healing to the dreamer. Most of us do not have a dream temple located conveniently nearby; but the idea of receiving valuable, healing dreams is an appealing one, so here are four simple steps for creating a dream temple anywhere you like.

Find or create a special place for dreaming
For those of us fortunate enough to have more than enough rooms in our living space, the answer is simple: make one of those rooms— perhaps a guest room that is rarely used—into a dream place. Furnish it sparklingly, but make sure that the bed is comfortable. For the majority of us who don’t have a room to spare, we need to be a little bit more creative. Clear some space in a room in which you are comfortable and designate it as your dream place. All the time, keep in mind that you are preparing your sleeping space to facilitate your dreaming.

Prepare yourself
You are going to be welcoming dreams in a way that you don’t ordinarily do, so treat the experience as special from the outset. You might want to take a long bath. Make yourself comfortable. Eat lightly, if at all, for dinner. It’s probably best if you don’t consume alcohol or smoke the day before your dream incubation. As you go through your activities, keep in mind that you are preparing yourself to welcome dreams.

Focus on dreaming
Throughout your day, you are simply preparing yourself to be more receptive to dreams. Focus on dreaming.

If you have a particular issue in your life, you might tell yourself to ask for guidance in your dream.

Sweet dreams
This is not a one-shot exploration. Try it for a few days or even for a week—or for as long as you like. ... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

Mandala

From a Sanskrit word meaning ’magic circle or disc’, a mandala is a circular visual representation that is used as a focus point for the practice of meditation. When creating a mandala, the artist attempts to coordinate their personal circle with the universal circle, reflecting how their life fits into the larger whole. Although the mandala form is often associated with Tibetan monk artists, who use them as an aid to meditation and visualization, and Navaho Indians, who create them out of multicolored sand as a formal geometrical expression of sacred vibrations, mandalas transcend culture and religion, time and place.

When a person concentrates on a mandala they are attempting to approach a higher plane of consciousness and, according to Jung, they are the ultimate symbols for uniting our inner and outer selves, being an archetypal expression of the soul. Jung found that the integrative properties of the mandala possessed considerable benefits in psychotherapy; by drawing mandalas, patients could impose order upon their inner confusion

A mandala is typically a circle enclosing a square with a symbol in the center representing the whole of life. In dreams, it can appear in many ways: as a square garden with a round pond, a square with a circle in the middle, a painting with a circle and so on. It can often appear in dreams without you realizing what it represents and it is only when drawn afterwards that it is recognized as a mandala. This suggests that it is a true expression of your individuality. It can also appear as an eightpointed star that represents both your aspirations and your burdens, and indicates what you have achieved with your life and what you have learned from your experience, both good and bad. The mandala may often appear in dreams when your waking life feels confusing or difficult; your dreaming mind conjures it as a symbol of the journey from chaos to order.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

Why Are Dreams Healing?

The idea that dreams can be healing is not new. In the ancient civiliza¬ tions of Egypt and Greece, patients who failed to respond to medical treatment could arrange to sleep in a temple especially dedicated to the god of healing. They hoped he would visit them in a dream, enabling them to regain their health. The temples of the Greek God Asclepius were especially renowned for their high success rate - and often grew rich on the contributions of grateful patients.

Native American Indians believed that dreams were sent by the Great Spirit, to act as a guiding light for your soul and prevent it from becoming lost in the darkness of ignorance. Losing touch with them would be disastrous, as you would then be unaware of your true path in life and become depressed or ill.

The eminent psychologist Carl Jung also believed in the healing power of dreams, many years of clinical experience convincing him that most of our problems are the

result of losing contact with our deepest instincts. He observed that there is a way of gaining access to the age-old wisdom hidden in each of us deep within the unconscious mind. That way is through our dreams.

Nowadays, doctors are well aware of the link between our state of mind and physical symptoms. Stress is a major factor in ill-health, whilst suppressed

feelings like rage or resentment can also disturb the body’s equilibrium and create dis-ease. Our dreams are nature’s way of helping us to maintain a balanced outlook. They usually contain helpful messages about the emotional adjustments we need to make from day to day. If we take these seriously, we avoid nurturing unrealistic attitudes and prevent the build-up of stress or toxic emotions.

Sometimes you may develop an illness if you secretly feel unable to face up to something and have a need for someone to take care of you. Your dreams can reveal your hidden agenda and suggest a way for¬ ward. In helping you to focus on the underlying cause of your symptoms, they enable you to participate in your own healing process.

Your dreams can further your emotional well-being by helping you to understand how your feelings and attitudes affect other people, often at a subliminal level, and can therefore create or destroy relationships. If someone has let you down, for instance, your dreams may reveal that, subconsciously, you expect people to disappoint you - and, sooner or later, that is exactly what they do. Once you wake up to the fact that relationships don’t have to turn out this way, you can transform your life.

Whether you need more confidence, to have better relationships, or the courage to make the correct decisions, your dreams can guide you through even the most difficult situations and help you to become the person nature always meant you to be. I hope this Dream Encyclopedia will inspire you to find out more about one of your most precious, yet most neglected natural resources - your dreams.... Dreampedia

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Dreampedia