Meaning of Germany Dreams | Dream Interpretation

Dream interpretations were found from 2 different sources.


Located in central Europe, Germany is made up of the North German Plain, the Central German Uplands (Mittelgebirge), and the Southern German Highlands. Germany’s major rivers are the Danube, the Elbe, the Oder, the Weser and the Rhine. In dreams, Germany is a symbol of fortitude, discipline and renewal, but it can also suggest hardship, injustice and fanaticism due to lingering associations with Hitler and the atrocities of World War II.

The Element Encyclopedia | Theresa Cheung

See Foreign.

The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams | Stearn Robinson - Tom Corbett


Germany | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Germany

0 dream symbols found for this dream.

Hair

Baldness, Beard.

A symbol of wealth and fertility. In mythology, cutting off the hair is the equivalent of castration. Samson was robbed of his strength when Delilah cut off his locks. Hair for men is a sign of freedom; for women, long hair is a sign of femininity. According to Robert Bly, wild men and wild women are always covered with hair. Those who dream about “hairy” beings are on the way to satisfying their own nature, longing for vitality. This longing for “the wild energies” to be set free is clearly expressed in the musical Hair, which depicts the mythology of the sixties generation.

Today, hair often appears in dreams in connection with wanting to create a certain image, one that we would like to present to the outside world. It also may refer to “splitting hairs.”

According to an ancient Indian interpretation, hair that has been cut off means grief and sorrow.

Also, hair-dreams are thought to be about close relatives. And, in addition, they may mean spiritual and intellectual property.

According to Freud, hair, as a secondary sexual characteristic, has phallic meaning. Also, according to Freud and Steckel in The Language of Dreams, dreaming of hair means castration.

In mythology, hair and beards play an important role.

The chiefs of the Masai were afraid they would lose their supernatural powers when their hair or beards were cut.

For many primitive tribes, hair was considered taboo.

To be protected from danger means never getting your hair cut. Kings in Franconia (Germany) would lose their throne if they had their hair cut. Young warriors of Teutonic tribes could cut their hair and beard only after they had killed their first enemy. Hair, therefore, seems to mean power, strength, and magical vitality.

Folklore: Abundant hair means wealth; little or gray hair, troubles.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

Rose

A symbol of Venus—love and devotion.

The contradiction of blossom and thorn.

The rose plays the same role in the West that the lotus plays in the Orient. Both blossom, producing many thousands of petals, and represent the highest stage of consciousness.

The rose is often a symbol of the self. As a well-known symbol of love, it points to the dreamer’s feeling of security and suggests that he should be more open to love.

The Greek word rodor for rose came from the ancient Greek word for “flowing,” which may have been coined to convey the flow of fragrance from this flower. But this never-ending flow of fragrance from the rose also shortens its life, causing it to wilt rapidly. Because this magnificently flowering, fragrant blossom wilts so fast, it is also considered a symbol of death.

The rose also points to the world beyond, which is the reason that the Catacombs in Rome are decorated with garlands of roses.

The rose also is the harbinger of death in the Oraclesy and it is reported that a few days before their death, bishops would find a white rose on their chair.

The belief in the death-announcing rose has influenced customs in England and Germany, where people have been reluctant to bring roses to a sick person. And if a rose bush produced a green rose—that is, when the petals turned green—as English folklore had it, a family member would die.

It is not only in England that the rose is connected with death. As far back as ancient Rome, every year a festival of the roses was celebrated where the dead were honored. Graves were decorated with wreaths made from roses.

Since time immemorial, what happens in the presence of the rose is not talked about. In antiquity, when a rose was suspended above the table, the meal was taken “sub rosa,” as it was called then, which means that absolutely nothing from the conversation was repeated after the meal.

The early Christians took up this symbolic tradition: the presence of a rose indicated that silence was to be observed when heathens were among them.

The rose as the symbol for silence continued into the 18th century, when, for instance, wooden roses were carved into the woodwork of the confessional and roses were also included in the stucco of the halls of the court.

The rose, like the lotus, is considered the perfect flower, which is one of the reasons why the Christian Church declared it to be the image of wisdom. This was instrumental in the rose becoming a symbol of Christ. Mary is also depicted as a rose, but a rose without thorns, because in Christian symbolism the thorns of the rose indicate sin, and Mary was free of sin.

The rose has something very mystical about it. Praying the rosary is considered meditation.

The Sufis pray with a drop of rose fragrance dabbed on the area of the “third eye,” because it is said that the rose cleanses and strengthens the spirit. In ancient Greece a wreath of roses was already thought to strengthen the mind.

The Roman Emperor wore a wreath of roses for the same reason. Romans wore wreaths made from roses during decadent outdoor feasts, because they hoped the roses would minimize the effects of too much drinking.

The rose as the image of a clear mind was also known to the alchemists, who connected the rose to the idea of deliverance. In Dante’s Paradiso the small group of saved sinners is pictured in the form of a white rose above which angels circle like bees. That the way to salvation is possible only through love is perhaps the most important lesson of the rose, the flower originally dedicated to Aphrodite, goddess of love. But that the rose also symbolizes flesh and blood is seen in the fact that Dionysus also claimed the rose to be his.

Time and again we hear about a rose bush that never stops blooming; about rose branches in a vase that for 70 years produced white blossoms; and about how the food for the poor that, in the basket of saints, is transformed into roses.

For those interested in the magic of the rose, we might also mention the Pentagram of the Rose.

If you connect the center of each petal with the center of the petal that comes after the next, you will form a pentagram, the foot of the Druids, the old magic figure that Faust wanted to use to overcome Satan.

The Greeks considered the long-lived, five-leaved rose bush, with the imprint of a pentagram, to be the symbol of the cycle of the Cosmos, which, according to Aristotle, is determined by the five elements (fire, water, earth, air, and ether). Also, the Rosicrucians see the rose as a symbol of hidden wisdom, using it as a symbol in their cross.

The color of the rose is also important.

A wilted rose is a sign of a relationship gone bad. According to Jung, the rose is always the symbol for wholeness, representing, in the form of the mandala, a symbol for the order of the world.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

Angel

(see Authority Figures, Icons)

A personal guide or guardian who either safeguards you in times of need or conveys important messages, most likely of a spiritual nature.

Divine blessings and protection, especially if one covers you with its wings. In Christianity, angels are servants and messengers for God, often attending and defending believers in their ministerial tasks.

What is the angel’s attitude toward you? If disapproving, this is a sign that you feel negligent toward important teachings from your youth or faith. This caused guilt and inner conflict over notions of “right” and “wrong.”

Recognition of bravery or honor. In Germany, winged Valkyries took great heroes to Valhalla, their version of heaven. In Persian tradition, similar beings called “houris” took faithful, courageous warriors to an erotic paradise for eternity.

Cosmic patterns and energy. In the 6th century, a monk named Cosmas Indicopleustes said that angels pushed and pulled heavenly bodies on their course. Other religious people claimed that the stars themselves were angels in disguise.

Cherubic angels: A type of Cupid, the Roman god of love, whose arrow smites humans with eros and passion.... The Language of Dreams

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The Language of Dreams

Beer

(see Beverages, Brewing)

In Egypt, dreaming of barley beer meant longevity to the dreamer, whereas a beer made from wheat portended joyous times ahead.

Love and commitment. In old Germany, the Minne (love) cup filled with ritual beer was offered to the bride and groom at weddings.

Social occasions. In Norse tradition especially, and among American sports fans, this beverage holds the connotation of something shared with good company. As such, it may also represent the spirit of hospitality.

A sense of fitting in and being one of the “guys.” Among almost all civilizations, beer was the beverage of common, everyday folk, who usually enjoyed it with each other.... The Language of Dreams

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The Language of Dreams

Flying

(see Airplane / Airport, Birds by type, Butterfly, Bat, Fairies, bisects by type, Wings)

Liberation or freedom. Overcoming a difficult situation and transcending limitations.

If you fly alone, this represents a personal journey filled with positive realizations.

If flying with others, this indicates the support of family, friends, or acquaintances, especially for a new endeavor.

An Out of Body Experience (OBE): Esoterically, flying through the air is sometimes interpreted as an OBE. Christian figures like Elisha and St. Anthony were believed to have this ability.

The ancient Egyptians called the astral body the ba, and in Germany the astral figure was sometimes likened to a doppelganger. No

matter the name, the purpose of such travel is to edify and educate the spirit, or potentially aid someone that you could not reach by normal means (see Bed).

With wings: If you have the wings of a bird when flying, check mythical or folkloric information on that bird for possible clues to your dream’s meaning.

For example, having the wings of a dove reveals nonviolent intentions or resolutions.

Wishful thinking (e.g., “flights of fancy”).... The Language of Dreams

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The Language of Dreams

Swastika

A symbol associated with the Third Reich of Hitler’s Germany, the swastika (with blades moving counterclockwise) represents forces of destruction. Inverted to its clock- wise rotation, it signifies creativity and regeneration.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

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Ariadne's Book of Dream

Horse

The horse has always been a mythical animal. Centuries ago, especially in England and Germany, dreaming of a white horse was considered a harbinger of war. According to Jung, the horse expresses the magical side of man, unconscious intuition. Indeed, from this magical character comes the belief that horseshoes bring good luck. Because of their speed, horses can also embody the wind, the fire, and the light.

Dreaming of horses means you can tame your passions and, therefore, your will has control of your actions.

If the horse runs wild it means you have lost control and let yourself get carried away by your passions.

If you are afraid in the dream it also indicates that you fear your most natural instincts. The horses are also sex symbols and, according to Freud, they represent the terrible aspects of the father figure. In short, horses are the wild forces of the subject’s psyche, whose primary need is that you master them without repressing them.

In some myths and fairy tales, horses have the ability to speak like humans.

If this happens in the dream, it is the voice of your unconscious contacting you. In Greek myths, horses were linked to Hades, god of the underground and death. However, the most common oneiric prophecy says that horses announce news from a faraway place.

If in your dream someone is putting shoes on a horse, you will soon have the best of fortunes.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

Precognitive Disaster Dreams

The following precognitive disaster dreams certainly challenge our preconceptions and rational explanations about how the world and the dreaming mind relate to one another.

In his book Recollections of Abraham Lincoln, 1847-1865, Ward Hill Lamon relates a dream Lincoln had shortly before his death. In the dream, Lincoln heard a group of people mournfully weeping downstairs in the White House, but when he went to investigate, he found no mourners, although their desperate weeping continued. Upon entering the East Room he discovered a corpse wrapped in funeral vestments. Demanding of one of the soldiers stationed there, ‘Who is dead in the White House?,’ he received the reply, ‘The President. He was killed by an assassin.’ A day before the SS Titanic’s demise, a woman on the infamous ship dreamt of the horrible event that was to occur the next day. She told her husband, who scoffed at her worries and ignored her pleas. However, the dream so affected her that she secretly prepared herself the night before and had all her children sleep in their warm clothes in order to be ready at a moment’s notice. During the night, after the ship struck the iceberg, she and her children were rescued and escaped the sinking ship. Her husband, sadly, went down with more than 1,500 people.

In 1914, one hundred and twenty Newfoundland sealers were abandoned on an ice-floe in the North Atlantic during winter. The incompetence of the ship’s captain, and of other crew members, meant that the missing men were not noticed for two days and two nights. By the time they were rescued, more than half were dead. It was the worst disaster to strike the Newfoundland sealing community in many years. However, the disaster did not come without warning. One of the fiftyfive survivors later told of a dream he had two weeks before the disaster. According to Cassie Brown’s report on the disaster: ‘John Howlet had suffered a chilling nightmare weeks before. In his dream he was on a mountain of ice, lost and freezing. He was alone, terribly and frighteningly alone, but everywhere he wandered there were vague, indefinable “things” on the ice around him—things with no particular shape that he could make out. He found himself walking among those things, unable to find his way, wondering what they were and dreading them. In his dream he was counting, counting, counting…He was still counting the white mounds when he awoke, shivering and terribly depressed.’

Unfortunately, even this dream did not make him avoid joining the crew of the ship, Newfoundland, most of whom would be dead in a matter of days. It was only afterwards he realized that the bodies covered with snow were the white mounds from his dream.

In his autobiography, Jung recounts disturbing dreams and visions in 1913. In one vision he witnessed a monstrous flood covering Germany and realized a catastrophe was in progress. ‘I saw the mighty yellow waves, the floating rubble of civilization, and the drowned bodies of uncounted thousands. Then the whole sea turned to blood.’ Jung said he was perplexed and nauseated, assuming this vision was personal. It was not until World War I broke out a year later that he realized its collective nature. This irrational experience led Jung to conclude that each person’s unconscious possesses not only a personal, but also a collective, dimension.

Probably one of the best-established and most reputable cases of premonitions of disaster comes from the grim events that occurred on 21 October 1966 in Aberfan, Wales. On that day, 116 children and twenty-eight adults were killed when a large mountain of coal collapsed and buried a small section of the town of Aberfan, including an elementary school filled with children. The disaster touched nearly every family in the town and effectively extinguished an entire generation of children. After the disaster, the reports of premonitions began to flood in. The mother of one of the deceased students reported that her ten-year-old child (who died in the disaster) had a dream the night before which foretold the disaster. The child told her mother, ‘I dreamed I went to school and there was no school there.

Something black had come down all over it.’

The reports of precognitive dreams literally came from all over Wales and England. One lady had a nightmare that she suffocated in ‘deep blackness’. Another dreamed of a small child being buried by a large landslide. Another clearly saw a schoolhouse be buried by an avalanche of coal, and rescue workers digging frantically for survivors. Another woke up from a nightmare in which she was being buried alive. On the morning of the disaster, Mrs Sybil Brown woke from a dream in which she saw children being overcome by ‘a black, billowing mass’. Probably the clearest of the premonitions was reported by a man in north-west England who claimed that the night before the disaster he had a dream which consisted only of letters being spelled out in dazzling light: A-B-E-R-F-A-N. At the time, the dream had no meaning to him. Hours later, he would realize with horror what it meant.

An interesting phenomenon occurred in the aftermath of the terrorist plane attacks that destroyed the World Trade Center and damaged the Pentagon on 11 September 2001: numerous people came forward with reports of vivid dreams they’d had of these disasters in advance. The dreams were filled with images that later took place: planes crashing into buildings, planes crashing on the ground, tall buildings collapsing, flames shooting out of buildings, people running covered in gray ash, and feelings of panic, mass death and war. These nightmarish dreams were so realistic that many people awoke from them in terror and sweat.

The question most often raised about precognitive disaster dreams is, if so many people dreamed in advance of these disasters, why could nothing have been done to prevent them? The answer is that most people who have precognitive dreams only realize that they have had them after the events the dreams foretold have taken place, and they see how their dreams matched the events. Other dreamers, especially those who have periodic or frequent precognitive dreams, usually do not dream enough specific details to know exactly what is going to happen, where, and when. Some may only have a sense of dread that ‘something terrible’ is going to happen, usually soon. For example, a dream that a tall building is collapsing would not have sparked the immediate connection that terrorists were going to fly planes into the World Trade Center on the morning of 11 September 2001. A dream analyst would more likely interpret the image dream within the context of the dreamer’s life, suggesting that the dream reflected emotional turmoil within the dreamer’s life.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

Flags And Their Symbolism

The way in which a flag is treated in your dream may represent the feelings you have towards the country that flag represents.

If it is dirty, burned, torn or trampled on, this may suggest anger against those who have attacked the country or anger against the country itself. A sea of waving flags in a crowd may suggest benign patriotism or a sense of foreboding about excessively strong nationalism.

If the flag is unknown, it may be a tribal emblem of your entire network of family and friends. Do you feel supported by them or neglected? Your positive or negative attitudes towards the flag in your dream may reveal your unconscious feelings on this issue. As always, the colors of your particular flag—whether or not the flag is known to you or associated with a country you have been to—will be significant.

As far as the universal symbolism for flags is concerned, you can ascribe meaning to certain symbols, but bear in mind that your personal associations should be considered first. For example, the cross in the flags of Greece, the Scandinavian countries and Britain is a symbol of Christianity, but it may be telling you something else.

Similarly, the Arabic writing on the flag of Saudi Arabia saying ‘There is no god but God, Mohammed is His Messenger’ and ‘God is Great’ on the flag of Iraq are also Islamic messages. The Star of David on the flag of Israel is an ancient Jewish symbol.

Religious symbolism can also be expressed via color. Green is often used in the flags of Arab and Islamic countries, such as Libya, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia; the flags of Kuwait, Jordan and Palestine all contain a green stripe. The flags of Turkey, Tunisia and Pakistan include the crescent moon, another traditional Islamic symbol.

Communistderived flags may include a hammer and sickle, as in the flag of the former USSR and the current flag of Angola, or a red background, such as the flags of China and Vietnam. The eagle has been used as a national or imperial symbol since the times of the Roman Empire, which was a huge and enduring Christian territory for over a millennium. Consequently, many Christian, imperial and other aspiring successors and hopefuls have adopted similar emblems, including Germany, Egypt, Russia and the Orthodox Christian Church.

Other symbols in flags can be self-explanatory, such as the ‘R’ in the middle of the old Rwanda flag, or they can be explained by the history, geography or flora and fauna of a country, such as the cedar tree in the flag of Lebanon.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

Unfamiliar Countries

If, in your dream, you find yourself in a country where everything seems strange and nothing seems familiar, this may suggest that you have difficulties in coping with change. However, if the people are friendly and welcoming, this may point to the stimulation and satisfaction of a new opportunity in waking life.

If you dream of a particular country but have never been there before, you might be imagining that you lived there in a past life. Alternatively, such a dream could represent the unknown within yourself, your dream journey representing an exploration of your unconscious.

Your dreams may use foreign countries in many ways to comment on your situation in waking life. For example, if you have bills to pay, the dream may be set in a tax haven such as Switzerland; if it is about your instincts, it may be set in some tropical jungle. Unless you have personal associations with the country in your dreams, if your dream is about a cold country, such as Poland or Russia, such a dream may be about your emotional life, with cold countries representing the need for more warmth in your life. In much the same way, hot countries, such as those in Africa or southern Asia, may represent passion.

More specifically, you may associate France with love, Italy with glamor, Germany with efficiency, Spain with passion, the USA with selfreliance, Belgium with dullness, and all the other clichés with which we stereotype foreigners and foreign countries.

Foreign Places and Peoples

If your dream highlighted a specific foreign country the brief information below concerning the various countries, continents and parts of the world may help you with the interpretation. It will also apply to a foreigner you encounter in your dream or recognize as being from a particular country or region. For example, if you meet a French person in your dream, the interpretation for France would apply. See if any of the details given about the location, shape on a map, landscape, history or associations with a particular country trigger a personal association for you. You also need to pay attention to how you feel in the dream, as this will aid you with the interpretation. It would be impossible to list every single country; the list below is by no means comprehensive and simply designed to get you thinking along the right lines.

If the country or foreign person you dreamed about isn’t in the alphabetical list, or if you want to know more it might be worth your while doing some investigation of your own.

Finally, your dream country will belong to a specific continent or region; see if there are not wider issues at stake than merely those suggested by the country itself.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

Austria

Austria includes much of the mountainous territory of the eastern Alps. The country contains many snowfields, glaciers and snow-capped peaks. The Danube is the principal river, and woodlands cover nearly half of the country. Could any of these natural features have significance for you as symbols in your dream? If the focus isn’t on the landscape, Austria is the land of Mozart, Johann Strauss, Freud and Klimt; the country is also, like Germany and Switzerland, well known for its attention to detail and a tendency to strive for perfection.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

Interpretation Of Dreams

“All dreams are given for the benefit of the individual, would he but interpret them correctly.”
EDGAR CAYCE

Most dreams are full of images: of people dead and alive, known and unknown, animals both domestic and wild, landscapes and buildings familiar and strange, or any number of other symbolic images such as jewelry, household things, clothing, and so on. A dream usually has some kind of a story line. You may find yourself on an adventure of some kind. You may dream of celebrities or other famous people either from the present or the past.

I once had a fascinating dream of visiting the president Woodrow Wilson, who had been in office during the time of World War I, long before I was even born. During my dream visit to the president, we talked of many things of a psychic and occult nature. I wondered what it meant. When I discussed this dream with my dreamwork partner, who was a good bit older than I and very knowledgeable about matters concerning the occult, he told me that Woodrow Wilson had held seances in the White House! At the time, I was just beginning my own studies of the occult and having psychic experiences on a regular basis.

Food is another symbol that often appears in dreams. The kind of food and how it is presented and eaten (if eating occurs) are matters for the dreamer to understand. Food dreams may relate to what you had for supper—or what you wanted to have and didn’t get. Or you may have food concerns, such as being on a diet to lose weight or trying to gain weight.

The number of symbols that the dream-mind can produce is practically endless, and most of these symbols are up for individual interpretation. Some, however, have universal meaning. We’ll discuss mostly the first kind in this chapter.

PERSONAL DREAM SYMBOLS

One of the best ways to get at the meaning of the symbols in your dreams is by free association. This is the method made popular by the psychologist Sigmund Freud. In this method, you simply go with the first thing that pops into your mind when the trigger word is given. Do the exercises presented on pages 48–50 in order to begin to get familiar with your own word associations.

AMPLIFICATION OF SYMBOLIC MEANINGS

Once you have identified a symbol in a dream, you can use the free association process to get at its meaning. If you don’t immediately get an associative thought about the dream symbol, work backward through your feelings and experiences with the symbol until you hit something that fits or makes sense. Suppose, for example, that you see a tiger in a dream. Do you like tigers or are they an object of fear? Maybe you saw a nature film recently about tigers and are concerned about their survival as a species. The important thing is to discover what a tiger means to you in the present, for the meanings of your symbols can change over time.

As you begin to work with your dreams on a regular basis and gain a high level of ability to recall your dreams (which we’ll discuss in chapter 5), you will become familiar with your own personal symbolic style. Most of us are influenced symbolically by the objects we are familiar with—such as religious symbols like crosses and pictures of saints or holy people—and also by our everyday life experiences. For example, if you have a pet of any kind, you are likely to dream about that animal. Of course, you may dream about animals even if you don’t keep a pet, and you may dream about wild animals. But if you dream of your own pet, it will have personal significance to you alone.

Sometimes you have a dream that seems to complete some unfinished business of the day—say you had a math problem you couldn’t solve and you dreamed yourself in a classroom with the solution written on the blackboard. Freud believed that dreams were “wish fulfillment” vehicles, and it is true that we can dream of things or experiences that we want (such as getting a date with a particular person) but dreams are much, much more than simple wish fulfillment. They are complex and multileveled, as you will realize by working steadily with your dreams.

“Then your I is no longer your mundane little self but the I of the Big Dreamer who is dreaming the whole universe.”
Fred A. Wolf, Physicist

Most dream symbols are not to be taken literally. You often need to do a bit of sleuthing to get at what the message of the dream symbol, or story, is for you. An example I read in one dream book was a dream of Bob Hope hopping on a pogo stick. At first, this seems nonsensical, but the dreamer was depressed and the dream was interpreted as “Hope springs eternal.” Here’s an example of a recent series of dreams of my own, concerning food.

  • I was preparing to go on an eating program that required the elimination of all sugar, and as soon as I had set a date to begin I started having dreams of all kinds of luscious desserts—beautifully iced and decorated cakes, pies piled high with whipped cream, the most enticing confections of chocolate from cakes to cookies and everything in between, pastries stuffed with sweet cheese and iced with thick sugar, fancy French fruit tarts of every description.
  • At first, I took this to be simple resistance of my unconscious to changing my eating habits, but I actually don’t eat a lot of sweets, and when I do have dessert I favor simple, homey things like custard, stewed fruit, or fruit cobbler. I’ve never had a taste for heavily iced cakes, plus I am one of the few people on the planet who doesn’t like chocolate! So why was I dreaming of all these fancy sweet foods that I wouldn’t even want to eat?
  • My first take on the dreams—of which there were several during a week or so—was that I was feeling deprived in advance and that my imagination was plying me with these luscious images of sweets to weaken my decision to eliminate sweets. But this didn’t make a lot of sense, as the fancy confections weren’t what I’d want to eat anyway. So I looked deeper.
  • What was food as a symbol to me, especially this kind of elaborately prepared party food? Well, party food means a party—or at least company for dinner. I’d been going through a period of relative isolation, partly because I was busy writing and partly because I hadn’t been feeling up to par. My social life had dropped to almost zero. The dreams were actually telling me that I was feeling deprived of—not the coming lack of sweets—but what special food, especially desserts, represents socially. Food of course represents nourishment; however, my dreams were not about nutrition! My first interpretation of deprivation was definitely a clue to the true meaning of the dreams. Yet they were a message that I needed, not sweets, but some sweet occasions and to take the time to be with people more. Can you think of a get-together that doesn’t involve food? Usually fancy food, and always, desserts.
  • Using this as an example, think of what dreams of fancy desserts might mean to you. And if you’ve ever dreamed of food, try to remember what kind of food and under what circumstances you dreamed of it. Then think of what those various foods might symbolize for you.

Here’s another example along the same lines, but with a different twist—that of a lemon peel!

  • A friend had been struggling with his weight, and he had decided to quit drinking his nightly martini in order to cut out some calories. He had decided to switch to a single glass of wine with dinner instead. He did this and found himself enjoying his new way of dining. But then he started having dreams about martinis. For about a week, he told me, he had nothing but dreams featuring martinis, with a twist of lemon peel. He had always put olives in his martinis, not lemon peel, so this puzzled him. When he told me about the dreams, I flashed on the standard language of a bartender, who when taking an order for a martini will say, “Do you want a twist?” After some discussion of what the word twist meant to him, he revealed that he had recently twisted his ankle and it had been quite painful, but he hadn’t bothered to see a doctor about the problem. His dream was showing him that a “twist” was in need of his attention. It didn’t relate to his martini drinking at all, except that this was a familiar picture and dreams always speak in our own language, even if they do twist it around a bit!

It is interesting to note that some types of dreams that we know to be quite common have never been reported from sleep labs (as least not as far as I have found in my research). One of these is the nightmare. It seems that people don’t want to tell their deepest fears to a sleep lab researcher. Another common type is the wet dream, so named for when a male ejaculates semen while dreaming (though females also have this type of sexual dream). It is interesting to note that most of the subjects in sleep labs are young male college students, whom one might presume to often have wet dreams. But these are, apparently, considered too private to dream when under observation.

Most dreams are not to be taken literally; just because you dream of someone dying does not mean the person will die. In fact, the literal interpretation of dreams can be dangerous and cause fear and anxiety. Also, dream books are not to be trusted. It’s worth repeating that you have your own set of inner symbolic meanings. What a cat means to me—an avid cat lover—and what a cat means to someone who hates or fears cats would be something quite different. Always remember that your inner symbol-producing mechanism is yours alone, unique. That being emphasized, there are a few symbols that can be considered universal, such as the ocean or water representing the unconscious processes.

The best way for you to learn to interpret your own personal symbol system is by continually paying attention to your dreams, writing them down, and doing your own interpretations. Dream interpretation is an art, not a science, and no scientific sleep lab can read the content or measure the meaning of dreams. Isis, the ancient Egyptian goddess queen, was believed to say “No mortal has lifted my veil,” and this can well apply to the scientific efforts to penetrate the mysteries of dream in sleep labs.

If you are just beginning to pay attention to your dreams, begin the process of interpretation by recording the symbols that appear most frequently. This applies especially to any recurring dreams or motifs you may experience. For example, I know that when my cat Fuzz (who’s dead now) appears in a dream, it means my heart center is the subject of the dream. Depending on the story line of the dream and what Fuzz is doing or how we are interacting, I can figure out what the dream message about my heart is.

“There are a lot of people on the planet right now who don’t think that dreams are important. Perhaps it is that attitude which contributes to the ill health of the planet as a whole. If so, it depends more and more on you, the Spiritual Warriors of your generation, to weave the dreams that can heal the planet.”

Dr. Laurel Ann Reinhardt, “Dream Weaving,” in The Thundering Years by Julie Johnson

  • Recently, I dreamed that Fuzz had been hit by a car, but I knew instinctively that he was still alive. My brother was waiting outside in a car and I asked him to take me to find Fuzz and get an emergency vet. He did and Fuzz was saved. The dream came on the heels of a severe disappointment (one might say I was heartbroken), but I was being told that everything would come out all right in the end, which it did.
  • What is interesting about this dream is that even though I did not see the cat get hit by the car, I knew he was still alive. This told me that although I had been hurt emotionally, I would get over it. It also showed me that help was at hand—my brother was waiting in the car, and a vet was readily available. I had friends I could turn to who would help me to heal from a hurtful experience. In this way, our dreams spill over into everyday life.
  • The world of dream and intuition is really not divorced from our everyday reality, not a thing apart. Most people today think their dreams have nothing to do with real life, but they are wrong. We are all multifaceted beings with complexities of which often we are hardly aware. Too many people operate solely on linear thinking (the standard modern-day mode that is taught to young people in schools) and aren’t aware that there are other ways to think and to obtain information. As Seth, the “spirit guide” that Jane Roberts “channeled” in a series of books “by” Seth, says, “You must change your ideas about dreaming, alter your concepts about it, before you can begin to explore it. Otherwise, your own waking prejudice will close the door.”

    All of the many facets of our personalities are operating all the time, even when we aren’t conscious of them, just like our body chemistry goes on about its business when we are totally unaware of its functioning. Dreams can speak to parts of ourselves that we are ignoring, but we can’t get the benefit from them unless we pay attention and approach their symbolic messages with an open mind and trusting heart.

    While the symbolism in dreams may require interpretation, when we have difficulty with it we must realize that its purpose isn’t to mystify us. As Dr. Jung says in his autobiography, Memories, Dreams, Reflections:

    • I was never able to agree with Freud that the dream is a “façade” behind which its meaning lies hidden—a meaning already known but maliciously, so to speak, withheld from consciousness. To me dreams are a part of nature, which harbors no intentions to deceive but expresses something as best it can just as a plant grows or an animal seeks its food as best it can.

    In working with your own personal dream symbols and motifs to decipher the meaning of your dreams, you may need to come at them from all angles. The following mind-mapping technique is especially helpful for those who function better using pictures and images, colors and drawings, than using a strictly verbal or writing mode.

    As you practice interpreting your dreams and get more deeply into the process, it will become an enjoyable habit and you’ll soon feel like an old pro at the game. You will get better and better, and your confidence will start to soar. Even if you have only a scrap of a dream to go on, it can lead to fruitful ideas. Here’s an example from my personal files:

    • The Dream: A blond man speaks to me at a hotel of some sort. He breaks into French as his English fails him, and though I don’t know French well I understand what he is saying. He gives me a key, which looks like the key to the security lock on my front door in real life. I ask what it is for and he replies that I will find out. When I go back to my room at the hotel I find that the key fits into a TV set, tuning it to a higher octave or a channel, like UHF, but much higher than that. I watch something on this “TV” but don’t really understand it.
    • My interpretation of this brief fragment (for there was more I didn’t remember) is that I am being given the “key” to a higher channel of myself. I don’t yet know how to use this channel, and I can’t understand what is being shown on this new type of TV. In other words, I am receiving communications in a language I don’t fully understand. This dream had great meaning for me, as I was at that time in the process of becoming “psychic,” but didn’t really know what it meant or where it would lead. Later on, I experienced the “opening of the psychic door” on a trip to Germany, became a Tarot card reader, a professional astrologer, and a psychotherapist. This dream seemed to forecast these developments. That the man was blond suggests the Sun, or Higher Mind. His speaking in French might be a reference to my own French ancestors, all of whom spoke French as their native language, yet it was not taught to me so I grew up speaking English from day one. This hinted that I already “knew” the “foreign” language from hearing it spoken as a child.

    With a little skill, you’ll be able to start integrating your dreams into everyday life. We’ll get into this in the next chapter, where we discuss how you can use dreams for specific purposes. However, please approach the entire subject of your dreams, their interpretations, and how you can use them with an open mind and in a relaxed state. Getting tense over interpretation is counterproductive and will block your efforts to make connections.... Dreampedia

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