Meaning of England Dreams | Dream Interpretation

Dream interpretations were found from 1 different sources.


A dream of England or English people is a forerunner of difficult situations involving lack of cooperation which will require great tact and patient effort to overcome.

Unless, of course, you are English or live in England, in which case the national aspects of the dream have no significance and only the other details should be considered.

The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams | Stearn Robinson - Tom Corbett


England | Dream Meaning

The keywords of this dream: England

Yellow Rose

Yellow roses: jealous’ and alienation in your love relationship. Wilted roses: your love for another person is dying. Getting pricked by a thorn: you will face obstacles on your path and feel hurt in your love relationship.

Smelling the fragrance of a yellow rose in a dream means kissing a sick woman.

Infidelity

Joy and gladness

Joy and friendship.

For example, purple roses are exotic emotions, red is for passionate love, and yellow is for friendship.

The red rose may symbolize desire and passion, but it is also the national flower of England, although both the white rose and the mixed white and red Tudor rose are sometimes used as well. In the United States, different roses have very different functions: yellow roses are given for friendship, white roses are the flowers of weddings, whilst red roses are appropriate at funerals.

(See Rose)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

Family

From our family we leam most of the positive and negative patterns of relationship and attitudes towards living, which we carry into daily events. Father’s uncertainty in deal­ing with people, or his anxiety in meeting change, may be the roots of our own difficulties in those areas.

If our mother is unable to develop a feeling contact with us, we may lack the confidence to meet our emotions.

Our maturation as a man or woman calls us in some way to meet and integrate our childhood desire, which includes sexual desire for our parent of the opposite sex, and rivalry with, mingled with dependence on, the parent of the same sex. Even a missing parent, the mother or father who died or left, is a potent figure internally.

An absence of a father’s or mother’s love or presence can be as traumatic as any power­fully injuring event. Our parents in our dreams are the image (full of power and feeling) of the formative forces and experi­ences of our identity. They are the ground, the soil, the bloody carnage, out of which our sense of self emerged. But our iden­tity cannot gain any real independence while still dominated by these internal forces of our creation. Heraclitus said we cannot swim in the same river twice; attempting to repeat or compete with the vinues of a parent is a misapprehension of the true nature of our own personality. Sec individuation.

Family group: The whole background of experience which makes up our values and views. This background is made up of thousands of different obvious and subtle things such as social status; amount of books in the home; how parents feel about themselves; how they relate to life outside the family; whether dominant roles are encouraged; what nationality par­ents are; what unconscious social attitudes surround the fam­ily (i.e. the master and servant, or dominating employer and subservient employee, roles which typified England at the turn of the century still colour many attitudes in the UK). Simply put, it is our internal ‘family’ of urges and values; the overall feeling tone of our family life—security, domination, whatever it was, the unconscious coping patterns of the fam­ily.

Parents together in dream: our general wisdom, back­ground of information and experience from which we make important decisions or gain intuitive insights. Parents also de­pict the rules and often irrational disciplinary codes we learnt as a child which still speak to us from within, and perhaps pass on to our own children without reassessment. These in­clude everything from ‘Don’t speak with your mouth full’ to the unspoken Masturbation is unholy/

Dead parent in dream: the beginning of independence from parent; repression of the emotions they engendered in us, our emotions regarding our parent’s death; feelings about death. See dead people dreams.

Example: ‘My father was giving me and another woman some medicine. Something was being forced on us. I started to hit and punch him in the genitals and, when he was facing the other way, in the backside. I seemed to be just the right height to do this and I had a very angry feeling that I wanted to hurt him as he had hurt me’ (Audrey V). Hurting, burying , killing parent: in the example Audrey’s height shows her as a child. She is releasing anger about the attitudes and situations her father forced down her throat’.

To be free of the intro­verted restraints and ready made values gathered from our parents, at some time in our growth we may kill or bury them. Although some people arc shocked by such dreams, they are healthy signs of emerging independence. Old myths of killing the chief so the tribe can have a new leader depict this pro­cess. When father or mother are dead’ in our dream, we can inherit all the power gained from whatever was positive in the relationship. Seeing parent drunk, incapable, foolish: another means of gaining independence from internalised values or stultifying drives to ‘honour’ or admire father or mother.

father

Generally positive: authority; ability in the external world; family or social conventions, how we relate to the ‘doer’ in us; physical strength and protectiveness; the will to be. Generally negative: introvened aggression; dominance by fear of other people’s authority, uncaring sexual drive; feelings of not being loved. See father under archetypes; man.

mother

Generally positive: feelings; ability in relationships; uniting spirit of family; how we relate to feelings in a relation­ship; strength to give of self and nunure; intuition. Generally negative: will based on irrational likes and dislikes; opinion generated by anxiety or jealousy; domination by emotions; lack of bonding. See Great Mother under archetypes; woman.

siblings and children

Whether brother, sister, daughter or son (see below in this entry), the most general use in our dreams is to depict an aspect of ourself. However it is almost universal to believe with great conviction that our dream is about the person in our dream.

A mother seeing a son die in her dream often goes through great anxiety because there lurks in her a sense of it being a precognitive dream. Vinually everyone at some time dreams about members of their close family dying or being killed—lots of mothers dream this, and their chil­dren live till 80. But occasionally children do die. Is the dream then precognitive, or is it coincidental?

Example: ‘I was walking along a rather dusty track carrying my younger son who would be around 10 months old and I was feeling rather tired. Suddenly I met a man who stopped to talk to me and commented I looked rather weary carrying the baby. He said, come with me and look over this wall and you will see such a sight that will gladden your hean. By standing on tiptoe I could just see over the wall and the sight I beheld took my breath away, it was so beautiful’ (Johan E). Here Johan’s son depicts the weight of responsibility she feels.

The beauty is her own resources of strength in motherhood.

Example: ‘I have just given binh to twins and they lay on the floor. We started to care for them. My mother took them to the doctor for his advice while I went to see my married sister who has two children. I met them there with the twins so that my sister could give her opinion on the babies. She had recent experience of childbirth and could tell us if the babies were good specimens’ (Miss E). Miss E has no children of her own, so she is uncertain of her own capacity to have and raise them.

The mother depicts her own mothering abilities, which seek confidence from an authority figure. Her sister is her own nearest experience of childbirth. So out of what she has leamt from observing her sister, she is assessing her own qualities.

Most often the family member depicts the qualities in our­self which we feel are part of the character of the person dreamt of. So the passionate one in the family would depict our passions; the intellectual one our own mind, the anxious one our hesitations. Use the questions in dream processing to define this. Having done this, can you observe what the dream depicts? For Miss E it would be questions regarding mother­hood.

Example: ‘My daughter told me the only positive part of my work in a helping profession was with a woman who had turned from it to religion. There followed a long and powerful interchange in which I said she had as yet no mind of her own. She was dominated by her mother’s anxiety, and the medical rationalism of her training. When she had dared to step beyond her own anxieties to integrate the lessons of her own life, then I would listen again’ (Desmond S). Desmond was divorced and struggling with his own pain and guilt about leaving his daughter while still a teenager. His daughter de­picts this conflict between his feelings and his rational self.

brother

Oneself, or the denied pan of self, meeting whatever is met in the dream; feelings of kinship; sense of rivalry, feel­ings about a brother. Woman’s dream, younger brother: out­going but vulnerable self; rivalry. Woman’s dream, older brother, authority, one’s capable outgoing self. Man’s dream, younger brother: vulnerable feelings; oneself at that age. Man’s dream, older brother: experience; authority, feelings of persecution. See boy; man. Idioms: big brother, brothers in arms; blood brother.

sister

Feeling self, or the lesser expressed pan of self; rival; feelings about a sister. Man s dream, younger sister: vulnera­ble emotions; rival for love of parents. Man’s dream, older sister: capable feeling self; feelings of persecution. Woman’s dream , younger sister: one’s experiences at that age; vulnera­ble feelings, rival for parents’ love. Woman’s dream, older sister: capable feeling self. See girl; woman. Idioms: sisters under the skin.

daughter

One’s relationship with the daughter, the daughter, or son, can represent what happens in a marnage between husband and wife.

The child is what has arisen from the bonding, however momentary, of two people. In dreams the child therefore is sometimes used to depict how the relation­ship is faring. So a sick daughter might show the feelings in the relationship being ‘ill’.

In a mother’s dream: often feelings of suppon or compan­ionship; feelings of not being alone in the area of emotional bonds; or one’s feeling area; responsibility; the ties of parent­hood; oneself at that age; one’s own urges, difficulties, hurts, which may still be operative. Also a comparison; the mother might see the daughter’s youth, opportunity, and have feelings about that. So the daughter may represent her sense of lost opportunity and youth—even envy, competition in getting the desire of a man.

In a father’s dream: one’s feeling self, the feelings or diffi­culties about the relationship with daughter; the struggles one’s own feeling self goes through to mature, how the sexual feelings are dealt with in a family—occurs especially when she starts courting; sister, parental responsibility; one’s wife when younger. Someone else’s daughter: feelings about one’s own daughter, feelings about younger women.

Example: 1 am standing outside a supermarket with heavy bags wearing my mac, though the sun is warm. My daughter and two friends are playing music and everyone stops to lis­ten. I start to wnte a song for them, but they pack up and go on a bus whilst I am still writing. I am left alone at the bus stop with my heavy burden of shopping, feeling incredibly unwanted’ (Mrs F). Such dreams of the daughter becoming independent can occur as soon as the child starts school, per­sisting until the mother finds a new attitude. See child; woman.

son

Extroverted self; desires connected with self expression; feelings connected with son; parental responsibility. Mother’s dream: one’s ambitions; potential, hopes; your marriage—see example.

Example: ‘My wife and I were walking out in the country­side. I looked around suddenly and saw my four-year-old son near a hole. He fell in and I raced back.

The hole was narrow but very deep. I could see water at the bottom but no sign of my son. I didn’t know whether I could leap down and save him or whether it was too narrow. Then somehow he was out. His heart was just beating’ (Richard H). Richard had argued with his wife in such a way he feared the stability of their marriage.

The son represents what they had created together —a child, a marriage.

The marriage survived, as his dream self-assessed it would. Death of son: a mother often kills off her son in her dreams as she sees him make moves towards independence. This can happen from the first day of school on. Example: T am on a very high bridge over an extremely wide and deep river with steep banks. My son does a double somersault over the railing, falls into the water. I think he is showing off. I am unable to save him. My son is 18 and has staned a structural engineering course at university’ (Joyce H).

The showing-off suggests Joyce feels her son is doing daring things with his life, and the relationship in its old form dies.

Father’s dream: yourself at that age; what qualities you see in your son; your own possibilities, envy of youth and oppor­tunities; nvalry. Someone else’s son: feelings about one’s own son; feelings about younger men. Dead son: see dead people dreams. Sec boy. See also man; first example in falling.

wife

Depicts how you see the relationship with your wife; your relationship with your sexuality; sexual and emotional desire and pleasure; how you relate to intimacy in body, mind and spirit; your feeling, intuitive nature; habits of relationship developed with one’s mother. Example: ‘My wife was trying to get me out of her life, and out of the house. It was as if she were attempting to push me into a feeling of tension and rejection which would make me leave’ (David P). Out of childhood experience, in which his mother repeatedly threat­ened to give him away, David was finding it difficult to com­mit himself emotionally to his wife. In the dream his wife represents these feelings, so he sees her—his anxiety and pain —pushing him to break up the marriage.

Example: I was standing with my wife at the end of the garden of the house I lived in as a child. We were looking over the fence to the rising meadow beyond. She said, “Look at that bird in the tree there.” On our right, in a small ash tree, an enormous owl perched. It was at least 4 feet high, the biggest bird I have ever seen. I recognised it in the dream as a greater hooded owl, which was not native to our country. I was so excited I ran into the house to telephone someone— zoo, police, newspapers?—to tell them about the bird. I can­not remember contacting anyone, but felt the bird was there in some way to meet me. Also it was hungry and looking at next door’s bantams. So I wondered what I could give it to eat’ (David P). This shows the positive side of David’s rela­tionship with his wife.

The garden is the boundanes which arose from his childhood. But he is growing—the garden— and looking beyond them in connection with his marnage.

The amazing bird is the deep feelings he touches because he has a mate, like any other natural creature. Out of his mating he becomes aware of drives to build a home—nest—and give himself to his mate. These are natural and are a pan of his unconscious or spiritual nature.

The bird is a hooded owl which can see in the dark—the unconscious—because David is realising things he had never seen’ before.

The bird is masked, meaning putting the ego aside, which is a necessity for touching the wider dimension of life or the unconscious.

The hunger of the bird shows an intimate detail of what David has learnt from his wife. She had been working as a waitress and bringing home pieces of chicken for him, saved from her own meal.

The spiritual side of David wants to develop this quality of selfgiving, which his wife’s love had helped him see.

Example: ‘1 have been a widower since January 1979, hav­ing married in October 1941. I continually dream I am in London where my business was. I am walking the streets with my wife and suddenly I see her ahead of me in a yellow raincoat and hat. I call her and try to catch up, but suddenly she vanishes. In spite of calling and searching I cannot find her’ (Douglas G). This is a common theme dreamt by widow­ers or widows, disappearance of spouse. Douglas has ‘lost’ his wife. His dream shows the paradox of love after death of panner. His love is still there, years after her death. He is possibly still trying to love his wife as an externally real per­son. so his feelings can make no connection.

To meet what actually remains of his wife, within himself, he would need to face his own internal grieving, emotions, and all the feelings, memories, angers and beauty which make up the living re­mains of his wife within him. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Girl

Feelings, emotional self; young sexuality, vulnerability.

In male dream: emotions; sexual feelings; daughter. Exam­ple: I was away from home somewhere and was helping and encouraging a young Japanese girl, who was pregnant, to come back to England to have her baby here. I felt a lot of care for her’ (Dave L). Dave processed his dream and discov­ered a lot of sexual pleasure in connection with the girl. He had held himself back in this area most of his life and, as he was learning to allow his sexual feelings (not simply genital sex), he found a deepening in his caring also.

In female dream: oneself at that age, whether older or younger, feelings about sister or daughter, the aspect of one­self ponrayed by the girl, as in following example: ‘I was watching and at the same time I was a young girl sitting on a lawn’ (Honey J).

Another girl with your man: how you deal with your sense of being wanted; anxiety about not being attractive or lovable; suspicion, a side of yourself which relates you differently to your man. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Sleep Walking

Very common with some people, especially during adolescence or times of stress. Sometimes accompa­nied by hallucinations. Sleep walking is normal as an occa­sional event in children.

If the child is agitated, excited or acting in a manner to injure themselves during the sleep walk­ing, then it may be a sign of emotional distress.

The same applies to adults. Many sleep walkers perform complex acts without coming to harm.

A young Ponsmouth boy drove his father’s car 27 miles before waking in South­ampton.

The police checked his story and did not charge him. But sometimes severe injury is inflicted either upon them­selves or others. During a dream phone-in on London Broad­casting Company, a man told me his experience of smashing through a glass window, cutting an artery and nearly bleeding to death. In America and England homicidal acts have been committed while the person claimed to be sleepwalking, and the people involved were acquitted of murder.

Because of such powerful activity during sleep, many peo­ple who experience this type of sleep walking are worried about what they might do to a partner sleeping next to them.

In most cases one wakes as the contact is made, or the in­volved person wakes one, but the element of risk cannot be denied. Where such worry exists, hope can be gained by un­derstanding what was observed with many men who began to sleep walk after war combat. In their cases the movements, speech and emotions were observably connected with trauma occurring during their war experience.

The self regulatory process in dreams was thereby attempting to release the ten­sion, horror or emotional pain of the events. Where these emotions could be met consciously, perhaps with the help of a psychotherapist, the sleep movements stopped. This sug­gests that dramatic activity while sleep walking has similar roots, and can be dealt with. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Rose

A symbol of Venus—love and devotion.

The contradiction of blossom and thorn.

The rose plays the same role in the West that the lotus plays in the Orient. Both blossom, producing many thousands of petals, and represent the highest stage of consciousness.

The rose is often a symbol of the self. As a well-known symbol of love, it points to the dreamer’s feeling of security and suggests that he should be more open to love.

The Greek word rodor for rose came from the ancient Greek word for “flowing,” which may have been coined to convey the flow of fragrance from this flower. But this never-ending flow of fragrance from the rose also shortens its life, causing it to wilt rapidly. Because this magnificently flowering, fragrant blossom wilts so fast, it is also considered a symbol of death.

The rose also points to the world beyond, which is the reason that the Catacombs in Rome are decorated with garlands of roses.

The rose also is the harbinger of death in the Oraclesy and it is reported that a few days before their death, bishops would find a white rose on their chair.

The belief in the death-announcing rose has influenced customs in England and Germany, where people have been reluctant to bring roses to a sick person. And if a rose bush produced a green rose—that is, when the petals turned green—as English folklore had it, a family member would die.

It is not only in England that the rose is connected with death. As far back as ancient Rome, every year a festival of the roses was celebrated where the dead were honored. Graves were decorated with wreaths made from roses.

Since time immemorial, what happens in the presence of the rose is not talked about. In antiquity, when a rose was suspended above the table, the meal was taken “sub rosa,” as it was called then, which means that absolutely nothing from the conversation was repeated after the meal.

The early Christians took up this symbolic tradition: the presence of a rose indicated that silence was to be observed when heathens were among them.

The rose as the symbol for silence continued into the 18th century, when, for instance, wooden roses were carved into the woodwork of the confessional and roses were also included in the stucco of the halls of the court.

The rose, like the lotus, is considered the perfect flower, which is one of the reasons why the Christian Church declared it to be the image of wisdom. This was instrumental in the rose becoming a symbol of Christ. Mary is also depicted as a rose, but a rose without thorns, because in Christian symbolism the thorns of the rose indicate sin, and Mary was free of sin.

The rose has something very mystical about it. Praying the rosary is considered meditation.

The Sufis pray with a drop of rose fragrance dabbed on the area of the “third eye,” because it is said that the rose cleanses and strengthens the spirit. In ancient Greece a wreath of roses was already thought to strengthen the mind.

The Roman Emperor wore a wreath of roses for the same reason. Romans wore wreaths made from roses during decadent outdoor feasts, because they hoped the roses would minimize the effects of too much drinking.

The rose as the image of a clear mind was also known to the alchemists, who connected the rose to the idea of deliverance. In Dante’s Paradiso the small group of saved sinners is pictured in the form of a white rose above which angels circle like bees. That the way to salvation is possible only through love is perhaps the most important lesson of the rose, the flower originally dedicated to Aphrodite, goddess of love. But that the rose also symbolizes flesh and blood is seen in the fact that Dionysus also claimed the rose to be his.

Time and again we hear about a rose bush that never stops blooming; about rose branches in a vase that for 70 years produced white blossoms; and about how the food for the poor that, in the basket of saints, is transformed into roses.

For those interested in the magic of the rose, we might also mention the Pentagram of the Rose.

If you connect the center of each petal with the center of the petal that comes after the next, you will form a pentagram, the foot of the Druids, the old magic figure that Faust wanted to use to overcome Satan.

The Greeks considered the long-lived, five-leaved rose bush, with the imprint of a pentagram, to be the symbol of the cycle of the Cosmos, which, according to Aristotle, is determined by the five elements (fire, water, earth, air, and ether). Also, the Rosicrucians see the rose as a symbol of hidden wisdom, using it as a symbol in their cross.

The color of the rose is also important.

A wilted rose is a sign of a relationship gone bad. According to Jung, the rose is always the symbol for wholeness, representing, in the form of the mandala, a symbol for the order of the world.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

White

Cleansing and innocence, attraction, and openness. Symbol of virginity and innocence.

A desire to go through life undefiled.

The color white in a dream points to purity—the dreamer is either living a pure life or is longing for it. One is seeking cleansing, and probably is already cleansed in a certain sense, simply by having a dream about the color white. But it could also suggest exaggerated cleanliness, an addiction to washing and cleaning, etc.

On the other hand, white can also be an expression of fear, such as the white whale in Moby Dick and the great white shark. Here the reference is to a blinding white color. Ghosts, like those appearing as mice during delusional episodes (delirium tremens), are always white.

The archetype of the wise man is usually clad in white (the guru, and also the physician). White is also the fundamental symbol for the animus; it addresses the male intellect and also male aggression (when white is experienced as blinding and gleaming).

The union of Red and white is that of contradiction: it is the symbol of the mystical marriage and Tantric sexuality (white semen and red menstrual blood). Here is where innocence meets the physical body and where heaven meets hell. Red and white are the colors of alchemy as well as the colors in the coats-of-arms of England and Switzerland.

Mabinogion, the ancient Welsh epic poem, refers to the white dogs of the underworld, except they have red noses and red eyes.

According to Freud, white always points to the feminine.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

White Thorn

White thorn is the bush Viviane hides behind to put a spell on Merlin.

The wood of the white thorn also is used to make magical wands. Considered a holy plant in Christianity, the white thorn grows in Glastonbury in southern England and is said to have been brought there by Joseph of Arimathea. It blooms twice every year.

Folklore: Good luck.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

Places

When the environment or setting of a dream is particularly noticeable there is usually some kind of message or information being given. Sometimes the place reflects our inner state of mind or mood. It can be a reminder of a particular place which had meaning at a specific time in the dreamer’s life, and sometimes a reminder of particular people.

Interpreting the symbolism of certain places gives us an insight into our own ‘inner landscape’.

A place which becomes fertile or lighter in the course of the dream indicates that an aspect that the dreamer has not previously appreciated - or has found unpleasant - is now developing possibilities and potentials, possibly for spiritual development. Dreary, unfriendly places, or tranquil favourable landscapes may well refer to the dreamer’s subjective view of the world.

The country where the dream takes place may have certain resonances for the dreamer.

For example; America for most people will signify a rather brash, commercially oriented culture, England tends to be seen as inhibited and dutiful, while France will represent the temperamental masculine, and so on. Countryside The countryside can suggest a particular mood or feeling, especially of freedom. Composite scenes consisting of many images recognisable to the dreamer are usually drawing attention to particular qualities, ideals and moods which all enhance the information content of the dream, may have particular associations for the dreamer, or have been included because of frequently encountered associations.

The dreamer’s birthplace represents a secure space.

A bright and sunny place suggests fun and liveliness, whereas a dark, shadowy, murky scene signifies despondency and gloom. Darkened places can represent the unconscious.

A familiar place will often take us back to childhood or a time of learning and a particularly beautiful place may allow us to fantasise so that we can make more use of creative visualisation. Jungles connect with the labyrinth and ways of understanding our sexuality.

A placc which feels oppressive has been a sanctuary, but is no longer.

A sheltered place offers pcace and security. Unknown places indicate aspects of ourselves of which we are not aware. This can lead to a place that seems familiar and yet we do not know which signifies a situation we arc continually re-running in our lives. Wide-open spaces offer us freedom of movement.

An unfamiliar place will signify new aspects of the personality which have not yet become fully conscious.

3- In the sense that a place suggests a ‘spot’, places appearing in dreams allow us to orientate ourselves in order to make the best use of information we arc given.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Bird

Birds, in general, mean success. Flying birds indicate a coming journey.

To have a bird land on your hand, arm, or head means an unexpected love is coming into your life.

To kill a bird, or find a dead bird, is an ill omen. Gypsies in different parts of England have different ideas about dreams concerning specific birds. Following are a few of those ideas:

Blackbird: A need for caution. Examine all business matters carefully.

Canary: Death of a friend.

A sudden departure.

A flying canary means temporary sickness.

Crow: You will be disappointed in an expectation and will have to make do with what you have.

Dove: Fidelity in love; happiness at home.

A flock of doves means an abundance of love and happiness. Two doves together mean reconciliation.

Eagle: A soaring eagle indicates great business success.

Falcon / Hawk: A soaring falcon or hawk, as with an eagle, means business success.

A swooping falcon or hawk means success in a legal matter.

To carry the bird on your arm and / or release it means to branch out, embracing new associates in your business or personal life.

Lark: A short vacation, with fun and relaxation.

Nightingale: To hear or see a nightingale is the forerunner of joyful news, great success in business, joy in love.

To hear a nightingale sing is to be assured of happiness.

Owl: You must give great thought to a coming problem, rather than making a snap decision.

If the owl flies away, you will find the problem is not as big as it seems.

To hear an owl hoot is to be warned of coming problems.

Parrot: Beware of slander. Don’t listen to gossip.

Peacock: To dream of a peacock is a sign of popularity, but beware of pride and vanity If it is a peacock which suddenly spreads its tail, beware of ostentation.

To hear a peacock scream means there is an approaching storm that will do you some damage. This could be a domestic or business “storm.”

Pigeon: To dream of a flying pigeon, according to Gypsies in Yorkshire, is to expect news in the form of a letter.

If you don’t see the pigeon land, it could be good or bad news.

If you see the bird land, then it is definitely good news.

Raven: A favorite bird of the Gypsies. Many dream books call this a bird of ill omen, but Romanis say that to dream of it signifies a family reunion with much happiness and joy to come.

If it is flying, the reunion will be unexpected; if at rest, it will be something you organize.

Swallow: Flying swallows mean happiness and good fortune. Nesting swallows mean close friendship.

Swan: You will have a happy and contented family life.

If there are young signets with the swan(s), then you will have children.

Vulture: Represents a bitter enemy.

To kill a vulture is to triumph over your enemy To see one devouring its prey is a warning about a lawsuit.... Gypsy Dream Dictionary

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Gypsy Dream Dictionary

Sweeping

To be sweeping with a broom means that you need to clear out all the smaller, accumulated bits and pieces of your life and concentrate on the more important things, claim Gypsies in the southwest of England.... Gypsy Dream Dictionary

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Gypsy Dream Dictionary

Flowers

(see by type, Field)

Fulfillment and maturity in yourself, a job, or a relationship.

Research the specific flower for other more detailed associations. Most have correlations with divine beings, historical figures, and folkloric attributes.

For example, the lily is often an emblem of Christ, the rose is often a symbol of Mary, the Mother Goddess, and of England, and lavender portends renewed happiness.

Personal values, morals, and characteristics budding to the forefront.

Appearing as an offering: See Altar, Sacrifice.

Gathering in a garden: A delightful surprise, depending on the flower. Buttercups portend successful business, carnations foretell love, irises predict communication from someone you miss, and primroses are an omen of new friendship.

Dying or wilting: Personality disorders, physical maladies, or decreased energy that erodes inner beauty.

Alchemically, an alternative emblem for the soul, as the petals radiate from the center, like the body around the spirit.

Opening flowers represent potential, hope, and the first evidence of manifestation with regard to your goals.

Victorians used flowers to communicate messages and for a special petaled divination system in which each blossom meant something different. Consider if your words are being directed with flowery sentiments that may or may not be appreciated and understood by the recipient.... The Language of Dreams

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The Language of Dreams

Robin

(see Birds, Feathers, Wings)

As a harbinger of spring, the robin nearly universally represents renewed hope, fresh beginnings, reversals in negative attitudes, and a dawning light being shed on difficult situations.

In England, an emblem of fertility, especially if one comes pecking at a window.... The Language of Dreams

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The Language of Dreams

Fruit

As with Colours, the meaning of Fruit in your dream varies according to the kind. Almonds or Nuts show difficulties, but not so great that they cannot be overcome. Apples are tokens of success and good health. Apricots or Peaches are very favourable signs especially in love affairs and friendships. Cherries or Plums show disappointment in domestic affairs, small family quarrels and difficulties.

Currants indicate happiness in married life, a faithful and devoted partner. See Grapes. Elderberries or Wild Fruits indicate difficulties. You may not secure great prosperity, but you will find yourself comfortably placed in business and in home affairs.

Figs are generally considered a foreign fruit, though they are sometimes grown in England. Expect small legacies or unexpected news.

Filberts: See Almonds.

Gooseberries are similar to Currants, and concern your domestic affairs.

Grapes indicate success in business, as well as happiness in your home life. See Currants.

Lemons are an omen of family discord or of disappointment in love. See Oranges.

Melons show a successful intervention on your part in some trouble among your friends.

Mulberries or Raspberries or Strawberries are favourable for love affairs and domestic happiness.

Nuts: See Almonds.

Oranges indicate business difficulties. See also Lemons. Peaches: See Apricots.

Plums: See Cherries. Raspberries: See Mulberries,

Strawberries: See Mulberries,

Walnuts See Almonds.

Wild Fruit: See Elderberries. ... Mystic Dream Book

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Mystic Dream Book

Places

Psychological / emotional perspective: The country where the dream takes place may have certain resonances for the dreamer.

For example, america for most people will signify a rather brash, commercially oriented culture, england tends to be seen as inhibited and dutiful, while france will represent the temperamental masculine, and so on. Other places that offer information for consideration are as follows: our birthplace represents a secure space where we feel at ease.

A bright and sunny place suggests fun and liveliness, whereas a dark, shadowy, murky scene signifies despondency and gloom. Darkened places can also represent the unconscious. Countryside can suggest a particular mood or feeling, especially of freedom. Composite scenes consisting of many images recognizable to us are usually drawing attention to particular qualities, ideals and moods. These all enhance the information content of the dream, may have particular associations for us or have been included because of frequently encountered associations.

A familiar place will often take us back to childhood or a time of learning and a particularly beautiful place may allow us to fantasize so that we can make more use of creative visualization. Jungles connect with the labyrinth and ways of understanding our sexuality, whereas a place that feels oppressive has formerly been a sanctuary, but is no longer.

A sheltered place offers peace and security. Also see the individual entry. Unknown places indicate aspects of ourselves of which we are not yet aware. Such places can lead to an environment that seems familiar and yet we do not know it. This signifies a situation we are continually re-running in our lives. Wide-open spaces offer us freedom of movement.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

Ascension

Rising to a place in dreams indicates that you are capable of overcoming any obstacle that life puts in your path. This type of image reveals ascension to a superior plane. Such a situation permits you to improve your personal relationships. (See ELEVATOR, HILL, and JUMPING)

This dream foretells economic losses.

Ash Once the fire is out, ashes remain. Perhaps, you feel that all the good deeds in your lives have already taken place and there is nothing left. On the other hand, you can be too anchored to the past or overthinking something that is already over. Ashes can represent failure of a relationship or a business. Also, they are often identified with death and dissolution of bodies. Everything that comes into contact with the fire of life is submitted to ashes. For the Hindu tradition, ashes are a symbol of indestructibility. In a dream, they portray the irreducible part of yourself.

Ashes predict disadvantages: bad harvests, unsuccessful businesses, and children who cause problems to their parents. According to gypsies, however, this dream means that you will finally stop lamenting opportunities lost a while ago. In many tribal societies ashes are also a symbol of fertility and good fortune. In England and the United States, in fact, it is believed they protect against evil spirits.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

Horse

The horse has always been a mythical animal. Centuries ago, especially in England and Germany, dreaming of a white horse was considered a harbinger of war. According to Jung, the horse expresses the magical side of man, unconscious intuition. Indeed, from this magical character comes the belief that horseshoes bring good luck. Because of their speed, horses can also embody the wind, the fire, and the light.

Dreaming of horses means you can tame your passions and, therefore, your will has control of your actions.

If the horse runs wild it means you have lost control and let yourself get carried away by your passions.

If you are afraid in the dream it also indicates that you fear your most natural instincts. The horses are also sex symbols and, according to Freud, they represent the terrible aspects of the father figure. In short, horses are the wild forces of the subject’s psyche, whose primary need is that you master them without repressing them.

In some myths and fairy tales, horses have the ability to speak like humans.

If this happens in the dream, it is the voice of your unconscious contacting you. In Greek myths, horses were linked to Hades, god of the underground and death. However, the most common oneiric prophecy says that horses announce news from a faraway place.

If in your dream someone is putting shoes on a horse, you will soon have the best of fortunes.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

Influential People In World History

Certain key figures in human history have had such an impact on world history that your unconscious may have stored the information—perhaps from school or college days, or even from a documentary or media report—and then drawn upon that knowledge to create an image that can encourage, teach or inspire you in dreamland. The list below contains some of the world’s most influential figures and gives keywords to trigger personal associations. Please note that the list is by no means comprehensive or definitive; if the influential person in your dreams isn’t listed here or in this chapter and you want to find associations that have meaning and relevance to you, it might be worthwhile reading their biography or autobiography, or investigating their life story and significance to world history.

Alexander the Great: Conqueror, empire building, warrior archetype.

Aristotle: İnfluential greek philosopher, the importance of asking questions and challenging conventional thought.

Bell, Alexander Graham: İnventor of telephone, communication, networking .

Bonaparte, Napoleon: French emperor, tactician, warrior archetype, exile.

Columbus, Christopher: Explorer, led europe to the americas, new territories to discover, new potential.

Confucius: The founder of confucianism, wise old man archetype.

Copernicus, Nicolas: Priest, astronomer, taught heliocentricity, the world revolves around the sun.

Daguerre, Louis: Pioneer of photography, vision, impressions, image change.

Darwin, Charles: Biologist, formulated theory of evolution, survival of the fittest.

Descartes, René: Rationalist philosopher and mathematician, logic, reason, ı think therefore ı am.

Edison, Thomas: İnventor of light bulb, illumination, insight.

Einstein, Albert: Physicist, theory of relativity, greatness achieved by power of the mind.

Fermi, Enrico: Father of atomic bomb, ultimate weapon of destruction, the last resort.

Fleming, Alexander: Penicillin, advances in bacteriology, immunology and chemotherapy, strengthening your defenses.

Ford, Henry: İndustrialist, revolutionized mass production, the repetition of the production line.

Galilei, Galileo: Catholic astronomer, accurately described heliocentric solar system, visionary, conflict of authority with freedom of thought.

Gutenberg, Johann: Developed movable type, printed bibles, communication, the printed word.

Machiavelli, Niccolò: Author of the prince, archetype of the manipulator.

Marconi, Guglielmo: İnventor of the radio, communication, words, reaching a large audience.

Marx, Karl: Social philosopher, marxist communism, class struggle.

Michelangelo: Painter; sculptor, architect, diversity, energy, talent.

Moses: God’s messenger, leader of people out of slavery.

Muhammad: Prophet of ıslam, founder of major world religion, military and political leader, pure ideals, indomitable will.

Newton, Isaac: Physicist, theory of universal gravitation, laws of motion, universe working like clockwork.

St Paul: Proselytizer of christianity, dogma, tradition, rules and regulations.

Plato: Greek philosopher, intellectual focus on spiritual concepts rather than physical elements of life.

Shakespeare, William: Playwright, understanding of complete range of human emotions, stupendous output.

Voltaire: Writer and philosopher, crusade against tyranny and bigotry, the importance of tolerance.

Washington, George: First president of the united states of america, the basic rights of the individual, david versus goliath.

Watt, James: Developer of steam engine, new possibilities, travel.

William the Conqueror: First king of modern england, beginning a new project, invasion.

Wright, Orville and Wilbur: Inventors of airplane, longing to escape, fly away or reach new heights... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

Dream It With Flowers

In Victorian America and Europe, flowers were attributed with specific meanings by young men and women who used them during courtship to send messages to each other, whether in a forthright manner or by more clandestine means. Straightforward romantic or poetic thoughts were conveyed by the presentation of a single bloom, whilst lengthier messages were communicated by larger arrangements.

Love and happiness were not the only feelings expressed by these floral epistles. Infidelity, jealousy, disdain and rejection were also expressed by a suitably chosen bloom. Whilst a simple flower may have been sent to a young lady to propose marriage, another seemingly innocuous blossom may have been sent in response, telling the gentleman caller to ‘get lost’. The color of the flower was extremely significant; to cite a few examples, red usually meant love, yellow indicated friendship, lavender suggested enchantment, and orange fascination.

As far as dream interpretation goes, the list of meanings is seemingly endless, as nearly every flower has been attributed with a specific meaning at some point in time. In Victorian times, the range of available flowers was limited, and so certain flowers had specific meanings; today, with so many flower choices, there are no rules—it’s the sentiment and personal association that gives the flower meaning to you in a dream. For those interested in the historic or generally accepted meanings of flowers, the list below has been compiled from a variety of different sources, including the American Society of Florists.

Historic and generally accepted meanings of flowers Acacia: Concealed love, chaste love

Agapanthis: Secret love

Alstroemeria: Aspiration

Amaryllis: Pride, drama

Ambrosia: Your love is returned

Anemone: Sincerity, fragility

Apple blossom: Promises

Arbutus: Thee only do ı love

Aster: Symbol of love, daintiness, contentment

Azalea: Take care of yourself for me, abundance, symbol of womanhood (china)

Baby’s breath: Festivity

Bachelor’s button: Anticipation

Begonia: Deep thoughts

Bells of Ireland: Good luck

Bittersweet: Truth

Black-eyed Susan: Encouragement

Bluebell: Humility

Cactus: Endurance

Caladium: Great joy, delight

Camellia (general): Graciousness, good-luck gift for a man

Camellia (pink): Passionate longing

Camellia (red): A flame in the heart

Camellia (white): Admiration

Carnation (general): Fascination, women, love

Carnation (pink): Gratitude, ı’ll never forget you

Carnation (purple): Caprice, whimsy

Carnation (red): Passion, drama, admiration

Carnation (solid color): Affirmation

Carnation (striped): Refusal, sorry ı can’t be with you, wish ı could be with you

Carnation (white): Sweetness and loveliness, innocence, pure love, remembrance, woman’s good-luck gift

Carnation (yellow): Cheerful for all occasions (except in matters of the heart, when it means rejection)

Cattail: Peace, prosperity

Chrysanthemum (general): Cheerfulness, rest

Chrysanthemum (bronze): Excitement

Chrysanthemum (red): Sharing

Chrysanthemum (white): Truth

Chrysanthemum (yellow): Slighted love, secret admirer

Cosmos: Peace

Crocus: Foresight, cheerfulness, gladness

Cyclamen: Resignation, good-bye

Daffodil: Chivalry, respect, regard, unrequited love

Daisy: İnnocence, loyalty, loveliness, purity

Dandelion: Faithfulness, happiness

Delphinium: Boldness

Fern: Magic, fascination, confidence, shelter

Fir: Time

Flax: Domestic symbol

Forget-me-not: True love, good memories

Forsythia: Anticipation

Freesia: Full of spirit, trust

Gardenia: Joy

Geranium: Comfort

Ginger: Pride

Gladioli: Sincerity, strength of character, flower of the gladiators

Gloxinia: Love at first sight

Heather (lavender): Admiration, solitude

Heather (white): Protection, wishes will come true

Holly: Defense, domestic happiness

Honeysuckle: Happiness

Hyacinth (general): Sincerity

Hyacinth (blue): Constancy

Hyacinth (purple): Sorrow

Hyacinth (red/pink): Play

Hyacinth (white): Loveliness

Hyacinth (yellow): Jealousy

Hydrangea: Perseverance

Iris: İnspiration

Ivy: Wedded love, fidelity, friendship, affection

Jasmine: Grace and elegance

Jonquil: Desire for affection returned

Larkspur: Beautiful spirit

Lavender: Distrust

Lily (calla): Regal beauty

Lily (day): Enthusiasm, emblem for mother (china)

Lily (Eucharis): Charms

Lily (tiger): Wealth, pride

Lily (white): Virginity, purity, majesty

Lily (yellow): I’m walking on air

Lily of the valley: Sweetness, return to happiness, humility

Magnolia: Nobility

Marigold: Jealousy

Monkshood: Beware, a deadly foe is near

Moss: Maternal love, charity

Myrtle: Love, emblem of marriage

Narcissus: Egotism

Nasturtium: Conquest, victory in battle

Oleander: Caution

Orange blossom: İnnocence, eternal love, marriage and fruitfulness

Orange mock: Deceit

Orchid (general): Love, beauty, refinement, symbol for many children (china)

Orchid (Cattleya): Mature charm

Palm leaves: Victory, success

Passion flower: Burning passion

Peony: Healing, happy life, happy marriage

Petunia: Resentment, anger

Pine: Hope, pity

Poppy (general): Eternal sleep, consolation, imagination

Poppy (red): Pleasure

Poppy (white): Consolation

Poppy (yellow): Wealth, success

Primrose: Longing

Primrose (evening): İnconstancy

Queen Anne’s lace: Delicate femininity

Ranunculus: Radiance

Rhododendron: Beware

Rose (bridal): Happiness, love

Rose (dark crimson): Mourning

Rose (Hibiscus): Delicate beauty

Rose (leaf): You may hope

Rose (pink): Friendship

Rose (red): Love, ı love you

Rose (tea): I’ll remember always

Rose (thornless): Love at first sight

Rose (white): İnnocence and purity

Rose (white and red mixed): Unity, flower emblem of england

Rose (yellow): Decrease of love, jealousy

Rosebud (general): Beauty and youth

Rosebud (moss): Confessions of love

Rosebud (red): Pure and lovely

Rosebud (white): Girlhood

Roses (bouquet of mature blooms): Gratitude

Roses (single full bloom): I love you, ı still love you

Smilax: Loveliness

Snapdragon: Presumption

Spider flower: Run away with me

Star of Bethlehem: Hope

Statice: Success

Stephanotis: Happiness in marriage, desire to travel

Stock: Bonds of affection, you’ll always be beautiful to me

Sunflower: Pride, sunshine, adoration

Sweetpea: Shyness, thank you for a lovely time

Tulip (general): Love, flower emblem of holland

Tulip (pink): Caring

Tulip (purple): Royalty

Tulip (red): Declaration of love

Tulip (variegated): Beautiful eyes

Tulip (white): Forgiveness

Tulip (yellow): Passionate longing

Violet (general): Modesty, faithfulness

Violet (blue): Watchfulness, faithfulness, ı’ll always be true

Violet (white): Adventure, risk taking

Viscaria: Celebration

Wisteria: Welcome, steadfast

Zinnia (magenta): Lasting affection, thoughts of friends

Zinnia (mixed): Thinking (or in memory) of an absent friend

Zinnia (scarlet): Constancy

Zinnia (white): Goodness

Zinnia (yellow): Daily remembrance ... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

Precognitive Disaster Dreams

The following precognitive disaster dreams certainly challenge our preconceptions and rational explanations about how the world and the dreaming mind relate to one another.

In his book Recollections of Abraham Lincoln, 1847-1865, Ward Hill Lamon relates a dream Lincoln had shortly before his death. In the dream, Lincoln heard a group of people mournfully weeping downstairs in the White House, but when he went to investigate, he found no mourners, although their desperate weeping continued. Upon entering the East Room he discovered a corpse wrapped in funeral vestments. Demanding of one of the soldiers stationed there, ‘Who is dead in the White House?,’ he received the reply, ‘The President. He was killed by an assassin.’ A day before the SS Titanic’s demise, a woman on the infamous ship dreamt of the horrible event that was to occur the next day. She told her husband, who scoffed at her worries and ignored her pleas. However, the dream so affected her that she secretly prepared herself the night before and had all her children sleep in their warm clothes in order to be ready at a moment’s notice. During the night, after the ship struck the iceberg, she and her children were rescued and escaped the sinking ship. Her husband, sadly, went down with more than 1,500 people.

In 1914, one hundred and twenty Newfoundland sealers were abandoned on an ice-floe in the North Atlantic during winter. The incompetence of the ship’s captain, and of other crew members, meant that the missing men were not noticed for two days and two nights. By the time they were rescued, more than half were dead. It was the worst disaster to strike the Newfoundland sealing community in many years. However, the disaster did not come without warning. One of the fiftyfive survivors later told of a dream he had two weeks before the disaster. According to Cassie Brown’s report on the disaster: ‘John Howlet had suffered a chilling nightmare weeks before. In his dream he was on a mountain of ice, lost and freezing. He was alone, terribly and frighteningly alone, but everywhere he wandered there were vague, indefinable “things” on the ice around him—things with no particular shape that he could make out. He found himself walking among those things, unable to find his way, wondering what they were and dreading them. In his dream he was counting, counting, counting…He was still counting the white mounds when he awoke, shivering and terribly depressed.’

Unfortunately, even this dream did not make him avoid joining the crew of the ship, Newfoundland, most of whom would be dead in a matter of days. It was only afterwards he realized that the bodies covered with snow were the white mounds from his dream.

In his autobiography, Jung recounts disturbing dreams and visions in 1913. In one vision he witnessed a monstrous flood covering Germany and realized a catastrophe was in progress. ‘I saw the mighty yellow waves, the floating rubble of civilization, and the drowned bodies of uncounted thousands. Then the whole sea turned to blood.’ Jung said he was perplexed and nauseated, assuming this vision was personal. It was not until World War I broke out a year later that he realized its collective nature. This irrational experience led Jung to conclude that each person’s unconscious possesses not only a personal, but also a collective, dimension.

Probably one of the best-established and most reputable cases of premonitions of disaster comes from the grim events that occurred on 21 October 1966 in Aberfan, Wales. On that day, 116 children and twenty-eight adults were killed when a large mountain of coal collapsed and buried a small section of the town of Aberfan, including an elementary school filled with children. The disaster touched nearly every family in the town and effectively extinguished an entire generation of children. After the disaster, the reports of premonitions began to flood in. The mother of one of the deceased students reported that her ten-year-old child (who died in the disaster) had a dream the night before which foretold the disaster. The child told her mother, ‘I dreamed I went to school and there was no school there.

Something black had come down all over it.’

The reports of precognitive dreams literally came from all over Wales and England. One lady had a nightmare that she suffocated in ‘deep blackness’. Another dreamed of a small child being buried by a large landslide. Another clearly saw a schoolhouse be buried by an avalanche of coal, and rescue workers digging frantically for survivors. Another woke up from a nightmare in which she was being buried alive. On the morning of the disaster, Mrs Sybil Brown woke from a dream in which she saw children being overcome by ‘a black, billowing mass’. Probably the clearest of the premonitions was reported by a man in north-west England who claimed that the night before the disaster he had a dream which consisted only of letters being spelled out in dazzling light: A-B-E-R-F-A-N. At the time, the dream had no meaning to him. Hours later, he would realize with horror what it meant.

An interesting phenomenon occurred in the aftermath of the terrorist plane attacks that destroyed the World Trade Center and damaged the Pentagon on 11 September 2001: numerous people came forward with reports of vivid dreams they’d had of these disasters in advance. The dreams were filled with images that later took place: planes crashing into buildings, planes crashing on the ground, tall buildings collapsing, flames shooting out of buildings, people running covered in gray ash, and feelings of panic, mass death and war. These nightmarish dreams were so realistic that many people awoke from them in terror and sweat.

The question most often raised about precognitive disaster dreams is, if so many people dreamed in advance of these disasters, why could nothing have been done to prevent them? The answer is that most people who have precognitive dreams only realize that they have had them after the events the dreams foretold have taken place, and they see how their dreams matched the events. Other dreamers, especially those who have periodic or frequent precognitive dreams, usually do not dream enough specific details to know exactly what is going to happen, where, and when. Some may only have a sense of dread that ‘something terrible’ is going to happen, usually soon. For example, a dream that a tall building is collapsing would not have sparked the immediate connection that terrorists were going to fly planes into the World Trade Center on the morning of 11 September 2001. A dream analyst would more likely interpret the image dream within the context of the dreamer’s life, suggesting that the dream reflected emotional turmoil within the dreamer’s life.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

Rose

The rose is universally used to symbolize love and passion. As the flower of many goddesses, it also suggests femininity, beauty and fertility. In dreams, roses typically suggest romance, given that they symbolize your heart, the love and beauty that you hold within and your inner rose. Common everyday idioms might point to other general interpretations.

To be in a ‘bed of roses’ can indicate a situation of ease, luxury or comfort; to do something ‘under the rose’ suggests a meeting conducted privately or secretly; ‘smelling the roses’ hints at an appreciation of beauty, whilst ‘coming up roses’ might mean a good outcome or a prosperous turnout.

Be sensitive to the different meanings that both roses and colors have in different countries or regions. White roses are generally thought of as symbols of purity and virginity, so if you dream of them it may represent a yearning for innocence. But white is also the shade of mourning in many parts of Asia, so for some dreamers the image may provoke the quite different feelings of loss or bereavement. The red rose may symbolize desire and passion, but it is also the national flower of England, although both the white rose and the mixed white and red Tudor rose are sometimes used as well. In the United States, different roses have very different functions: yellow roses are given for friendship, white roses are the flowers of weddings, whilst red roses are appropriate at funerals.

Roses, their constituent parts and the places they grow can therefore suggest a host of often contradictory meanings.

A rose garden is a symbol of paradise, so if you dream of being in a rose garden, this may indicate happiness in your waking life. Roses, however, also possess thorns. In dreams, a rose with thorns may indicate a thorny problem with which you need to grapple to gain the reward promised by the rose. In this context, a dream of thorny roses may indicate conflict within a romantic relationship.

Does a fragment of your dream conceal a thorn or danger that is a threat to you? Finally, if you are given roses in a dream, consider their number and color. Twelve red roses may be a sign that the giver is in love with you.

Symbolic Meaning of Roses

  • Red rose: Love and respect.
  • Yellow rose: Joy and friendship.
  • White rose: Innocence, purity, and secrecy.
    (Hint: When it’s time to propose marriage, choose an all-white bouquet to show the purity of your intentions and add some ivy to express your promise of fidelity.).
  • Dark pink rose: Thankfulness.
  • Pale pink rose: Grace and joy
    (These flowers are particularly suited for newborns and weddings).
  • Light peach rose: Modesty.
  • Coral rose: Desire.
  • Orange rose: Fascination.
... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

United Kingdom

The United Kingdom, consisting of Great Britain (England, Wales, and Scotland) and Northern Ireland is a constitutional monarchy and parliamentary democracy, with a queen and a parliament that has two houses: the House of Lords and the House of Commons, which has 651 popularly elected members. In dreams, England can represent good friendship, lush green countryside, a tendency to adhere to social mores and tradition, and a glorification of past achievements and history. Northern Ireland is separated from Great Britain by the Irish Sea; frequently in the news for the religious tensions that still exist, this beautiful country is a symbol of undiscovered possibilities, as well as of inner conflict. It can also relate to undiscovered aspects of reality, unproven aspects of reality or the range of possibilities open to you. Scotland refers to a proud heritage and Wales denotes good heartedness and unpretentiousness.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia