Dream Interpretation Carnations | Dream Meanings


The significance varies according to the color and the action.

If you were just aware of the flowers you will have an unusual social success.

If your dream involved gathering the blooms you may expect a pleasant sur prise, probably in the form of a valuable gift White carnations predict a gratifying increase in status; bright red ones forecast an exciting love affair; pink ones indicate a happy domestic situation, and dark red or odd colored ones are an omen of prosperity through the help of good friends.

See also Flowers.

The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams | Stearn Robinson - Tom Corbett


Carnations | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Carnations

Books

(see Writing)

Sacred texts: Higher ideals and beliefs. Spiritual development and your relationship with sacred powers.

The state of your spiritual path may be noted by the condition in which this book appears.

Matters of learning and study. Check the title for a more complete picture. Please note, however, that education can equate to “life’s lessons” too.

On a bookcase: Accumulated knowledge that you have readily accessible.

A library: On the etheric plane this may represent the Akashic records that keep track of each soul and its incarnations, and all the knowledge of the Universe.

If you feel this interpretation is correct, then what you read in such a book is very important—it is part of your spirit’s birthright.

Closed with a bookmark inside: A momentary pause in learning that is vital so that you don’t burn out or overload.

Bookstores: Acquired knowledge in a specific area.

The type of bookstore or the section of the store reveals the genre after which you’re seeking, or that which you already possess.

A dictionary reveals overdependence on other people’s opinions and suggestions for management matters, especially in business. Give your own insight an opportunity to prove itself!

Shutting a book: Closing off a chapter of your life. Resolution of an issue, the end of a belief system, or conclusion of business dealings.... The Language of Dreams

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The Language of Dreams

Flowers

(see by type, Field)

Fulfillment and maturity in yourself, a job, or a relationship.

Research the specific flower for other more detailed associations. Most have correlations with divine beings, historical figures, and folkloric attributes.

For example, the lily is often an emblem of Christ, the rose is often a symbol of Mary, the Mother Goddess, and of England, and lavender portends renewed happiness.

Personal values, morals, and characteristics budding to the forefront.

Appearing as an offering: See Altar, Sacrifice.

Gathering in a garden: A delightful surprise, depending on the flower. Buttercups portend successful business, carnations foretell love, irises predict communication from someone you miss, and primroses are an omen of new friendship.

Dying or wilting: Personality disorders, physical maladies, or decreased energy that erodes inner beauty.

Alchemically, an alternative emblem for the soul, as the petals radiate from the center, like the body around the spirit.

Opening flowers represent potential, hope, and the first evidence of manifestation with regard to your goals.

Victorians used flowers to communicate messages and for a special petaled divination system in which each blossom meant something different. Consider if your words are being directed with flowery sentiments that may or may not be appreciated and understood by the recipient.... The Language of Dreams

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The Language of Dreams

Chiron

The newest heavenly body, Chiron is the sign of the wounded healer It may announce someone who has coped with a great deal of emotional pain and thus learned compassion toward others. Chiron’s appearance may call you to a healing profession It may also represent the influence of karma in your life brought up from previous incarnations or any other transgressions of your soul.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

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Ariadne's Book of Dream

Carnation

Symbol: The carnation represents passion and is seen in many pictures of Madonnas.

Vision: Dreaming about carnations: your love life is in excellent shape and your opportunities at work are good. In a man’s dream, the image of the carnation—and flowers in general— often refer to women who can be bought. Maybe he is hoping for such an adventure—a desire he can only admit to himself through flowers. Picking a carnation: thoughtless actions on your part will create a crisis with a friend. Looking at a wilted carnation: a close relationship will come to an end.

Depth Psychology: The carnation is usually a symbol for the connection you have to other people.

The color of the carnation is important. See the chapter “Color in Dreams.”... Dreamers Dictionary

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Dreamers Dictionary

Carnation

To dream of carnations indicates that you have a very laid-back and relaxed personality. You exude pleasure and elation. It can also imply your enjoyment of being single.... Dream Symbols and Analysis

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Dream Symbols and Analysis

Snake

Dreams of a snake signify wisdom, intuition and that you are connecting with your unconscious, mystery and untamed power.

The snake is also a phallic symbol that could represent sexual healing or it could reveal sexual trauma.

The snake, because it sheds its skin, represents your ability to release old incarnations, attachments and identities and reinvent yourself. Also, many religious teachings depict the snake to be evil, as in the Garden of Eden, revealing temptation and even the devil. However, ancient Hermetics teach that the snake represents the wisdom that is earned in facing and embracing your shadow. Consider the feeling tone. See Kundalini, Goddess Persephone, Breakdown/Breakthrough Dream.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Carnation

To see carnations in your dream symbolizes light-heartedness, vitality and joy.... My Dream Interpretation

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My Dream Interpretation

Christ

Religious svmbols mav appear in the dreams even of those who do not consider themselves religious. There are at least two reasons for this: first, even non-religious people have usually had some exposure to religious teaching,’and secondly, religion would seem to have an instinctive basis, originating in what vve now have to call (because we have lost touch with it) the unconscious part of the psyche.

One might be tempted to say that the Christ figure means whatever it means for you. That mav be true; but you are advised to consider the following possibilities.

(1) The Christ figure may represent perfection for you.

If so, it may be

functioning in your dream as a representation of your own true self. There may be a sense in which the Christ / supreme value is outside and beyond us: we are not yet perfect. However, the Christ in your dream comes from your own unconscious and signifies that what is of supreme value is realizable in yourself: indeed, it is yoprself, your not- yet-realized but potential self.

*

(2) If the figure is that of the Christ as a child, the interpretation given above is strengthened. See also Child, sections (3) and (4).

(3) If there is any association of homosexuality or bisexuality with the Christ in your dream, this again would tend to confirm the interpretation in (1) above. The hermaphrodite (literally, a fusion of the god Hermes and the goddess Aphrodite) is a recurring figure in religious symbolism - for example, the Hindu representation of Shiva as part man, part woman. It stands for the union of opposites. In psychic terms, such a figure represents the bringing together of conflicting forces such as conscious and unconscious, thought and feeling, ‘spirit5 and ‘body5, extroversion and introversion. See also Marriage.

(4) If the Christ in your dream is the crucified Christ, it may be a symbol of martyrdom.

If you identify with this figure, so that you are the wronged sufferer, ask yourself what purpose is being served by adopting this role. Does it make you happy? Well, pain may give pleasure if it helps us to feel ‘different5 and superior. (And that is often the other side of a martyrdom complex: an inflated view of self - inflated by fantasy.) But to get happiness by making yourself unhappy is self contradictory.

Your dream is most likely telling you to look at yourself objectively, and to get rid of the fantasy that has taken possession of you. It may help you to do so if you can identify the occasion that first started off this programme of self-punishment, or - failing that - any later occasions that reinforced the programme. The first cause will probably be some childhood feelings of guilt; and almost certainly it will be an imagined guilt, with little or no justification. (For instance, did you have, as a child, erotic desires for your parent of the opposite sex? So did we all.)

Above all, realize that you are not in the grip of some inexorable fate. What we call fate is actually those unconscious self-programmings that

begin as attempts to ward off the anxious fears that arise when our desires conflict with (real or imagined) parental or other authoritative disapproval.

(5) What is the Christ in your dream doing or saying? Is he healing someone - you? If so, the figure probably represents Nature’s power of healing that lies within yourself. The fact that this inner healing power reveals itself in a symbol means that it lies in your unconscious. You need to activate it, and the first step towards this consists of getting to know yourself better - vour unconscious self. In particular you need to get to know the opposed positive and negative forces at work in you and that element within you - perhaps long neglected - that is essential for healing. In psychological terms ‘healing’ means wholeness and harmony (the resolution of all serious inner conflicts). What is it vou need in your life to bring about wholeness? What part of you has been neglected?

The fact that the healing Christ has appeared in your dream, however, is a very good sign. It means that your unconscious is offering you its healing power. Don’t refuse it.

(6) Is the Christ figure pronouncing forgiveness? If so, it may mean either that you have been suffering from guilt-feelings and you have identified these as the symptoms of an inner conflict and are now ready to let go of the guilt and the tension; or that your unconscious is now offering you the means by w hich those guilt-feelings and the associated paralysing anxiety’ can be laid to rest once and for all.

In essence, forgiveness is a dissolving of guilt and anxiety’ (i.e. fear of punishment); and the dissolving agent is objective intelligence which sees through the guilt-feelings to their innocent cause. How can an innocent cause give rise to guilt-feelings? The answer lies in the power of fantasy, w’hich, especially in early childhood (w’hen, according to the psychologist Jean Piaget, no distinction is made between fantasy and reality’), makes mortal sins out of natural and unavoidable desires and leads to a belief that the whole world is bent on punishing the ‘offender’.

(7) Does the Christ figure in vour dream suggest submission and self- surrender, or non-resistance? If so, the dream may be understood to be showing you a pattern in your life that you need to change - a negative pattern of submitting to ‘fate’ or ‘circumstances outside your control’. Alternatively, it could be urging you to practise a positive kind of submission, in w’hich the ego gives wray to the greater wisdom of the unconscious, and false ambitions give wav to the promptings of the

inner true self - which represents your true ‘destiny5 (not to be confused with ‘fate5: fate is external, destiny comes from within).

(8) Is it the risen - resurrected - Christ who appears in the dream? If so, this may be taken as an auspicious sign of potential self-renewal or self-transcendence: the possibility of rising to a new and fuller selfhood, leaving behind all deep internal conflict, anxiety and discontent.

(9) Is the Christ in your dream surrounded by four figures (the four evangelists, or their symbols - angel, lion, ox, eagle)? This is a mandala (see Mandala), which represents psychic wholeness.

NB It can be dangerous to rely too heavily on a being outside ourselves. For example, to think of our sins as being off-loaded on to an external Christ may be a useful and, indeed, healthy stratagem so long as the idea is not taken literally; so long, that is, as it is seen as a symbolic representation of an internal process in which the sin-dissolving agent is our own intelligent T. Otherwise, we are in danger of relinquishing responsibility for our actions and for our own future.

The Christ figure - like all other figures that occur in your dreams - is thrown up by your unconscious and is a pictorial representation of something in the depths of your psyche.

This does not contradict the religious view of the Christ as a universal reality. It would seem that there is a layer of the individual psyche which is not an individual possession but belongs to Nature as such and manifests itself in every existing being. Psychology and theology meet in the mystical understanding which sees the Christ as the universal T, the only subject there is. This is to see all things and all persons as incarnations or embodiments of one and the same reality. This mystical view is found in all the great religious traditions.

If this view is true, it provides a basis for an immediate and intimate relation between the individual and God, a relationship which can properly serve as a source of certainty and confidence, a correct self-esteem and immunity to anxiety.... A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

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A Dictionary of Dream Symbols