Meaning of Activities And Environments Associated With Childhood Dreams | Dream Interpretation

Dream interpretations were found from 1 different sources.


Dreams about activities and environments associated with childhood can be either motivating or discouraging, depending on the details of your dream and how you felt. For example, if you had a happy time playing with your dolls or a toy train set, your dream may simply be reminding you of the simple pleasure of letting your guard down from time to time to do nothing useful but play and relax. These kinds of dreams are particularly common if you have been extremely busy recently and haven’t had time to have fun. If, however, you were bored by the toy or activity in your dream, your unconscious may be urging you to put away childish things that don’t really give you stimulation and satisfaction, and to spend your time more productively.

Toys in dreams not only reflect your desire for more play, or urge you to grow up in some way, they can also suggest nostalgia for childhood that has been lost. Dolls are especially important because they so resemble the human form, and because children endow them with emotions and characters. Your dreaming mind may therefore use a doll to symbolize something or someone in your life. For example, if you stick needles or pins in the doll, or mistreat it in any way, this can represent negative feelings towards a particular person. Many doll dreams use the doll as a target for violence and, if this is the case, it could also refer to how the dreamer felt as a child when smacked emotionally or physically—like a helpless child. Dolls can also represent emotions that the dreamer would like to discharge on someone else, or the feeling of wanting to be a precious doll to someone. It may also express some undeveloped part of the dreamer’s personality and the need to relearn some childhood lessons we may have forgotten.

If you dreamed that you were in a playground surrounded by other children, were you enjoying yourself or did you feel left out? If you felt exhilarated, your unconscious may once again be signaling your need to have more fun in waking life, but if you felt aloof or alone from the other children, it could suggest that you prefer to play no part in the immature behaviour currently displayed by a group of people in your waking life. See also references to toys and games in LEISURE.

The Element Encyclopedia | Theresa Cheung


Activities And Environments Associated With Childhood | Dream Meaning

The keywords of this dream: Activities Environments Associated Childhood

10 dream symbols found for this dream.

Activities And Environments Associated With Childhood

Dreams about activities and environments associated with childhood can be either motivating or discouraging, depending on the details of your dream and how you felt. For example, if you had a happy time playing with your dolls or a toy train set, your dream may simply be reminding you of the simple pleasure of letting your guard down from time to time to do nothing useful but play and relax. These kinds of dreams are particularly common if you have been extremely busy recently and haven’t had time to have fun. If, however, you were bored by the toy or activity in your dream, your unconscious may be urging you to put away childish things that don’t really give you stimulation and satisfaction, and to spend your time more productively.

Toys in dreams not only reflect your desire for more play, or urge you to grow up in some way, they can also suggest nostalgia for childhood that has been lost. Dolls are especially important because they so resemble the human form, and because children endow them with emotions and characters. Your dreaming mind may therefore use a doll to symbolize something or someone in your life. For example, if you stick needles or pins in the doll, or mistreat it in any way, this can represent negative feelings towards a particular person. Many doll dreams use the doll as a target for violence and, if this is the case, it could also refer to how the dreamer felt as a child when smacked emotionally or physically—like a helpless child. Dolls can also represent emotions that the dreamer would like to discharge on someone else, or the feeling of wanting to be a precious doll to someone. It may also express some undeveloped part of the dreamer’s personality and the need to relearn some childhood lessons we may have forgotten.

If you dreamed that you were in a playground surrounded by other children, were you enjoying yourself or did you feel left out? If you felt exhilarated, your unconscious may once again be signaling your need to have more fun in waking life, but if you felt aloof or alone from the other children, it could suggest that you prefer to play no part in the immature behaviour currently displayed by a group of people in your waking life. See also references to toys and games in LEISURE.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

Birth And Childhood

Whilst pregnant women often dream about giving birth in anticipation of the upcoming event, dreams of giving birth typically have very little connection with the biological process of reproduction and more to do with a sense of being reborn, of fresh beginnings, of ideas coming to fruition or a period of personal growth. This sense is mirrored in everyday language: ‘giving birth to a new idea’, which refers to a project, not a baby.

For Jung, dreams about giving birth were important because he believed they represented a stage in the process of what he called ‘individuation’, the growth of the human psyche to maturation and wholeness. Birth therefore represents the start of an important new stage in your life and psychological development. We tend to dream of birth at the beginning of a new life stage, way of life, attitude, ability or project. We also have such dreams when we need to let go of the past and come to terms with the new. Birth is symbolic of new beginnings: beginning college, starting or ending a relationship, launching a new career and moving house are all associated with birth themes in dreams. Although women from their teen years onwards tend to have birth dreams more than men, it can happen to anyone at anytime. There may often be something strange or unusual about the birth of the child. These details are important as they can symbolize what part of your life is changing and how others will receive this new development.

Jung also claimed that the symbol of the child, as with the symbol of birth, represents new beginnings and possibilities, and paves the way for future changes in your personality. A common theme in mythology is the ‘divine child’ or mystical hero or savior; for instance, the baby Jesus who saves the world from damnation. The divine child is the symbol of the true self, both vulnerable and pure, but also capable of great transforming power. In your dream, it may represent your true self urging you to explore new possibilities and reach your full potential. Therefore dreaming of a baby or child who could be yourself, one of your own children, a child you know or an unknown child, gives access to your own inner child. We all have parts of ourselves which are childlike, curious and vulnerable, and when we are able to get in touch with these parts we are reminded of our true potential for wholeness.

Although dreams of birth and childhood may appear to be simply nostalgic memories, most dream researchers believe that they have a strong bearing on your current circumstances in waking life. For example, your dream may be telling you that you have forgotten how to play or that you should take a fresher, more innocent approach to life. They may also be manifestations of an unconscious desire to escape from the responsibilities and problems of waking life. In addition, they may represent a part of you that needs reassurance and comfort, or a part of you that needs to care, to love and to begin anew. As such they can represent important psychological, spiritual and physical needs.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

Child, Childhood

Symbol: The child is a symbol of receiving unconditionally.

Vision: Watching healthy children at play: success and good times. Crying, screaming, and sick children, children that are falling down or undernourished, are all a sign of worries ahead. Giving birth to a child: a new job is opening up.

If the child is being baptized: you are returning to your religious faith. Seeing a sleeping child: your future will be free of worries. When a child appears in a woman’s dream, it usually means that she wants a child.

The dream may also indicate that new plans, your job, or other changes are emotionally taxing.

If the child appears time and time again, think about making some changes.

Depth Psychology: The child represents actual conflict situations that have become burdensome, and you are looking for a solution, a way out. This dream also means you want to “start over again” or avoid making a decision by going back home (being protected as a child). Dreams about childhood are usually an indication that you are trying to avoid responsibilities; but they may also be an expression of child-like character traits, or your dependency on others! If you dream about children frequently, make an appointment with a psychotherapist soon.... Dreamers Dictionary

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Dreamers Dictionary

Childhood

If you dream of being a child again, or if you dream of items from your childhood, this signifies that you will not be able to regain lost opportunities, even if you try very hard.

It is time to move on and forget the past.... My Dream Interpretation

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My Dream Interpretation

Childhood

To return to childhood in dreams normally indicates a need for protection.

It is the desire to return to the times when your mother cared for you and you didn’t have to worry. This type of image is usually produced when you are afraid to face the unknown. The future causes insecurity.

If you visit the neighborhood of your childhood, it may be able to help you recover an aspect of your past that remained unresolved, which you must now face in order to be at peace. In any case, childhood allows one to rediscover oneself.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

Childhood Dreams

The following dreams are typical of childhood and mirror the stresses, experiences and questions associated with this stage in life. It is possible, however, to have one of these dreams at any stage in your life. See also STAGES OF LIFE.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

Childhood Dreams

Research has shown that sensitive or gifted children tend to be more prone to dreams and nightmares. Dreams in childhood often mirror the stress and confusion that is associated with the early years of our lives. Frightening dreams or nightmares are common to children up to the age of around eight.

If you are a concerned parent, simply talking about the dream with your child can help dissipate the tension around them. Avoid the instinct to tell the child that it was just a dream and that dreams aren’t real, as this may discourage your child from confiding in you, or simply frustrate them because you don’t take it seriously. You may also have a child who dreams with their eyes open for a few seconds after the dream is over and they are awake. In general, such experiences are not signs of a disorder, but if you are concerned, talk to your doctor or a pediatrician.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

Childhood Home / Home From The Past

If your childhood home or a home from the past continually features in your dreams, this does not necessarily mean you are stuck in the past or long to return to the security of childhood. The homes in which you once lived can become symbols of certain factors that shaped the person you have now become. Perhaps the most common past home dream is that of living in the house you lived in when you were a child. There may be major changes to the structure of the house, there may be people there that you hadn’t met when you lived there, but you know that house more intimately than any other. It is a true reflection of yourself and the storehouse for all your emotions, both positive and negative. The house in which you grew up always has a huge influence on your psychology. Your house gives you boundaries and it is the place where you go to feel safe, its every corner a reflection of your mind. It is the symbol of your family, connections and traditions.

Your dream childhood home can help give you clues about your current situation and help you examine your personality. What kind of house was it? Was it a large or small house, and did you think it was the same size when you were young? Are you still living in the same house? How many floors did it have? How many windows? What was its shape? Most of us live in square houses with corners, but some people’s houses are round with no corners. Some suggest this may have a profound effect on a person’s psychology because circles represent infinity and thus no restrictions. Can you remember what colors your house was painted in; how do those colors affect your feelings now? If something good always happened to you in a certain room, the color of that room may still make you happy for the rest of your life. Was there a place in your house where you went if you were miserable, or a place where something bad happened? What were the colors and shapes that were involved? Is it a dark place or a light place?

Although you are by no means doomed to repeat past mistakes, your dreaming mind may use your first home as an important reference throughout your life and you may often find yourself trying to work through current issues in the setting of this childhood home. Try to think of such dreams as an opportunity to reflect on your basic beliefs about home and family. Are you repeating patterns from your childhood in a current relationship and situation? Can your dream help you relate the past to your present life and to your life in the future?... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

Childhood Recollections

(1) Many dreams repeat or allude to childhood experiences and impressions. Nearly all such dreams have a therapeutic purpose, giving us a clearer view of ourselves, perhaps showing us some attitude or pattern of behaviour that has been with us since childhood, and perhaps even showing us the original cause of it.

Unfulfilled instinctual desires provide the energy for manv of our dreams, and the fact that an instinctive desire remains unfulfilled may be connected with a traumatic experience in childhood. That experience has probably been repressed because it was traumatic - causing guilt, anxiety, fear of punishment. (For repression) Your dreams may, therefore, be helping you to uncover the source of these blockages which inhibit the free flow of the natural forces within you.

(2) Recurring dreams may represent some psychic disturbance or problem that originated in childhood. Here are some examples:

Dreams of being naked may sometimes represent recollections of, and perhaps longing for, the paradise of childhood when one w alked

around unclothed without embarrassment. (Sometimes these dreams, as Freud said, express a desire for someone of the opposite sex to present himself / herself in the nude, and stem from sexual frustration.)

Dreams of flying or falling may derive from childhood enjoyment of swings and see-saws. They may express straightforward yearnings for the remembered joy of childhood, but they may also reflect one’s present state of unhappiness and a futile desire to retreat from one’s problematic adult life. A problem is not a thing; rather, it is a relationship - for example, a relationship of conflict either between your external circumstances and your inner wishes (in which case the solution consists in either remov ing yourself from the circumstances or modifying your wishes) or between one part of your psyche and another (in which case the solution is to integrate the part that has been neglected). See also Falling, Flying.

Dreams of failure stem from childhood fears of disapproval from parents. However, die fact that your dreams contain these recollections suggests that you have programmed yourself for anxiety.

If so, begin by loving the child that is still within you: reassure it, tell it that everything is all right and that there is no such thing as failure where there is love. See also Failure.

(3) Dreams which contain recollections of yourself as a free and happy child may indicate a desire to find your true self. The child is then a symbol of the complete and permanent inner freedom and joy which are enjoyed only when you have become acquainted with all the forces within you - both conscious and unconscious - and have established harmonious relationships among them. See also Child, sections (2)-(4).

(4) The child may represent the primitive psyche with which your conscious ego needs to get acquainted if wholeness is to be achieved. This primitive psvche is the mind of humankind in its infancy, before the development of self-consciousness and reasoning. This original awareness is still with us, but buried in unconsciousness.... A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

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A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

Childhood Revisited

It is during childhood that we learn many of the fundamental rules and responsibilities of life. It is also the time when we develop our personalities and become increasingly socialized. It makes sense, therefore, that dreams of revisiting a place or a scenario from your own childhood often focus on lessons that you learned, or failed to learn, and these lessons may be relevant to your current situation.

If you dreamed of a particularly happy childhood memory—for example, you are seven years old and your dad brings home your first bike, or you are five years old sitting happily on your mum’s lap sucking your thumb—the dream could either be pointing to your nostalgia for a time when life was full of fun, or it could be more concerned with your present feelings of insecurity. The dream is reminding you of a time when life was simple, and in so doing, it compensates you for your current feelings of confusion.

If you are facing a difficult decision, it could also have been highlighting your need to put yourself forward and take a risk by focusing on your new bike—something you wanted but also feared, as you weren’t wholly confident riding it yet.

Consider, too, whether your unconscious has cast archetypal figures in the role of your mother and father. Relation-figures in dreams of childhood can often represent archetypes rather than actual family members. Alternatively, if your unhappy childhood returns to haunt you in dreams (which may reoccur), your unconscious may be forcing you to relive those miserable times in an attempt to make you confront the source of your distress and deal with it, now that you have an adult understanding of the situation. Your unconscious is trying to help you come to terms with what happened to you, so you can put it behind you.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia